Tag Archives: homophones

Cue (n, vi/vt) Queue (n, vi/vt)

Here are five worksheets on the homophones cue and queue. Both are used as nouns and verbs, and as verbs they can be used both intransitively and transitively. These words are in common enough use in English that I think these words ought to be able to find a place in most English classrooms, particularly for English language learners.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Way (n) and Weigh (vt/vi)

Snow falls heavily as I sit down to write this, so I’ll soon wrap up my day and leave to take advantage of this half day. Before I go, however, here are five homophone worksheets on the noun way and the verb weigh. Weigh, for the record, is used both transitively and intransitively.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Undo (vt/vi), Undue (adj)

OK, on this very dark, still morning in southwestern Vermont, here are five homophone worksheets on the verb undo and the adjective undue if you need your students to understand these words.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Sheer (adj/vt/vi), Shear (n/vt/vi)

As I was writing this mornings posts, I noticed that with the Weekly Text and the quote that tops it, Mark’s Text Terminal had reached 2,500 posts. So, to start out on the downhill slope to 3,00, here is a set of five homophone worksheets on sheer and shear.

Because the worksheets themselves explain the use of these words, I’ll say only that I had only the vaguest knowledge that sheer operated as a verb–both transitively and intransitively.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, November 18, 2019

This week’s Text is a set of five worksheets on the homophones sight (noun), site (noun and transitive verb), and cite (transitive verb). These are very commonly used words in the English language. For some learners, these are easily confused. Part of the reason I wrote this was to help students who needed to learn to cite sources for research papers. I took it as an opportunity to do some vocabulary building. These are short exercises for opening a class period after a transition.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Click (vt/vi/n) and Clique (n)

If one pronounces the noun clique in its French phonetic, it will sound like “kleek,” which renders these five worksheets on the the near homophones click and clique more or less inaccurate. However, if one pronounces clique as it is commonly done in the the United States, like click, then the five worksheets above will indeed serve as homophone worksheets.

In any case, these worksheets offer students–particularly English language learners–a chance to understand clique which is almost inarguably a word and concept students should know by the time they graduate high school.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

 

Canvas (n) and Canvass (vi/vt)

Here, at the end of an unbelievably dismal, pointless day of work, is a set of five homophone worksheets on the noun canvas and the verb–used both intransitively and transitively–canvass.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.