Tag Archives: lgbtq history

Provincetown

I worked part of a school year working in Springfield, Massachusetts. The kids I served there–and this was more a function of social class and the dismal high school they were compelled to attend–had a vague knowledge of Cape Cod, but not really any understanding of its geography, history, or role in the origins of the United States. Others, alas, weren’t aware it was geographically and legally part of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Since I was a “literacy interventionist” (whatever that is), without a set curriculum, I prepared this reading on Provincetown and its vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet to foster understanding of the Cape and its history. The LGBTQ kids were pleased to get ahold of this information.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Annie Allen

“Annie Allen: (1949) A book by Gwendolyn Brooks, winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1950. Its three parts fom a connected sequence about a black girl growing to womanhood. ‘Notes from the Childhood and the Girlhood’ includes eleven poems which provide glimpses of Annie’s birth, her practical and didactic mother, and her response to racism, killing, and death. ‘The Anniad,’ a mock heroic poem in forty-three stanzas, and three ‘Appendix’ poems, reveal Annie’s dreams of a gallant lover who goes off to war, returns home, marries her, leaves her, and returns home to die. The fifteen poems of ‘The Womanhood’ show how Annie looks bravely at a world she would like to reform. By the end, her outlook on life has changed from egoistic romanticism into realistic idealism.”

Excerpted from: Murphy, Bruce, ed. Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia, Fourth Edition. New York: Harper Collins, 1996.

James Baldwin on the Failure to Act

“If we do not now dare everything, the fulfillment of that prophecy, re-created from the Bible in song by a slave, is upon us: No more water, the fire next time!

James Baldwin

The Fire Next Time (1963)

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Go Tell It on the Mountain

Go Tell It on the Mountain: The first novel (1953) of the black US writer James Baldwin (1924-1987). The book has autobiographical undertones, and the climax is the religious conversion of a 14-year-old Harlem boy. At the center of the book are the boy’s troubled relations with his stepfather, a preacher of the storefront Temple of the Fire Baptized. Aspects of the slave era and of life in a dysfunctional family are recounted in flashbacks. The phrase ‘Go Tell It on the Mountain’ appears in the refrain of an African-American spiritual:

‘Go, tell it on the mountain,

Over the hills and everywhere

Go, tell it on the mountain,

That Jesus Christ is born’”

Excerpted from: Crofton, Ian, ed. Brewer’s Curious Titles. London: Cassell, 2002.

Cultural Literacy: James Baldwin

His premature death robbed the world of a keen, compassionate intellect. Since reading The Fire Next Time in my early twenties, my eyes have been wide open to his genius. If you want to know more about James Baldwin, I cannot recommend highly or often enough Raoul Peck’s magisterial documentary “I Am Not Your Negro.”

So, this Cultural Literacy worksheet on James Baldwin does not do the man justice, but it might serve as an introduction to him for your students.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Book of Answers: Gwendolyn Brooks

“Who was the first African-American to win the Pulitzer Prize in literature? Gwendolyn Brooks, in 1950, for Annie Allen.”

Excerpted from: Corey, Melinda, and George Ochoa. Literature: The New York Public Library Book of Answers. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1993.

James Baldwin, Metaphorically, on Labor and Dignity

“Consider the history of labor in a country in which, spiritually speaking, there are no workers, only candidates for the hand of the boss’s daughter.”

The Fire Next Time (1963)

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

The Weekly Text, March 8, 2019: Women’s History Month 2019 Week II–A Reading and Comprehension Worksheet on Alice Walker’s Novel “The Color Purple”

I don’t want to let Women’s History Month 2019 pass without posting something related to Alice Walker. To that end, here is a reading Ms. Walker’s novel The Color Purple and a vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet to accompany it. These, I was pleased to see, were of no small interest to the young women in the classes I currently teach.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review

Everyday Edit: Gwendolyn Brooks

Moving right along with Women’s History Month 2019, here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on Gwendolyn Brooks (and if you like this, the good folks at Education World will give you a yearlong supply of them).

Also, here is a PDF of Ms. Brooks’ linguistically elegant poem “We Real Cool.”

 

James Baldwin to Angela Davis

“If they take you in the morning, they will be coming for us that night.”

“Open Letter to My Sister, Angela Y. Davis” (1971)

Excerpted from: Shapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.