Tag Archives: Cultural Literacy

Cultural Literacy: Marginal Tax Rate

Because I work in a economics and finance-themed high school, I had call for this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the marginal tax rate.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Peter the Great

Here’s a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Peter the Great that might be useful in a global studies class.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: “Touch and Go”

Here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the expression touch and go. My students really rise to the challenge when presented with one of these idiomatic expressions, and they often, in fact, ask to do another when we’ve completed one.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: “When in Rome…”

Although Will Ferrell famously mangled it in “Anchorman,” your students needn’t, especially if you guide them through this Cultural Literacy Worksheet on the expression “When in Rome (do as the Romans do).” I’d originally tagged this as an idiomatic expression. However, since it apparently originated with Saint Augustine, who related it as advice to a traveler to Rome for the first time, it doesn’t clearly qualify as an idiom.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Carson McCullers

I don’t know if anyone teaches her anymore, but in my high school in the 1970s, there was interest in Carson McCullers. In fact, if memory serves, some of our teachers at City School, which is now called Malcolm Shabazz City High School, used the stage adaptation of The Member of the Wedding for one of our school plays. I saw the film adaptation of The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter just after high school, and later read the novel, both of which I found quite moving.

All of this is a long way around to offering this Cultural Literacy worksheet on Carson McCullers, whom I hope has not been forgotten.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Alienation

Because I think it’s a concept high school students ought to understand, I offer this Cultural Literacy worksheet on alienation this morning.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Je Ne Sais Quoi

Occasionally, if a few minutes remain in a period after a lesson, I’ll pull out a short exercise to keep students busy. Often, these are things like this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the french noun je ne sais quoi. I tell kids that while this isn’t something they will be tested on–and what a dismal standard for assessing the importance of knowledge that is!–but rather something they will need for cocktail party chatter when they become successful professionals.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.