Tag Archives: Cultural Literacy

Cultural Literacy: Quorum

Maybe you can use this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the quorum as a concept. I’d always assumed that the plural of this noun was quora, but as it turns out, and you can find this on the excellent question-and-answer website called, coincidentally, Quora, that the plural of quorum is more properly quorums. There is a fairly lively discourse on this; search “plural of quorum” if this is the kind of thing that interests you.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, July 19, 2019

It’s Friday again, so again it’s time for the Weekly Text at Mark’s Text Terminal.

This week’s Text is a lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “The Lunchroom Murder.” This Cultural Literacy worksheet on “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?”, the first line of Shakespeare’s 18th sonnet. Direct from the pages of the first Crime and Puzzlement book, here are the illustration and list of questions that drive this lesson. Finally, you’ll need the answer key to solve this mystery.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: The Treaty of Versailles

On a crisp Monday morning in southeastern Vermont, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Treaty of Versailles. This is a full-page reading exercise with six comprehension questions, so it can be used, I think, as independent practice. In any case, I’ve tagged it as such.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Every Dog Has His Day

I’m off this morning to take a certification test to teach history to high-schoolers here in Massachusetts. On my way out the door, let me drop this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the American idiom “every dog has his day.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: Check It

Let’s start this week, the last before I take a substantial break from blogging for a few weeks, with this complete lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Check It.”

I begin this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the American idiom “read the riot act” to get the class settled and engaged after a class change. Here from the Crime and Puzzlement book is a PDF scan of the illustration and questions that drive the analytical activity that is the gravamen of this lesson. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key that solves the case.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Feather One’s Own Nest

Finally, on an otherwise lazy Sunday afternoon, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the idiom feather one’s own nest.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Woody Guthrie

Billy Bragg, an British singer I’ve been listening to for over thirty years, announced yesterday on his Twitter feed that New York City will rename part of Mermaid Avenue on Coney Island (where Woody lived, and which is also the name of an excellent trio of albums of Woody’s songs by Mr. Bragg and the American rock band Wilco) as Woody Guthrie Way. Furthermore, this years Mermaid Parade features Arlo Guthrie as King Neptune and Nora Guthrie as Queen Mermaid. They are, you will perceive, Woody’s children. If you’re in Brooklyn, or anywhere near Coney Island, I urge you to attend this cool event.

Here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Woody Guthrie in celebration of the events limned above, and of Mr. Guthrie as an American treasure.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.