Tag Archives: Cultural Literacy

Cultural Literacy: Chauvinism

As I get ready to sign off for the day, I cannot thing of a better or more timely document to depart by than this Cultural Literacy worksheet on chauvinism.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on the Fall of Rome

OK! This lesson plan on the Fall of Rome, as below, is the tenth of ten lessons, logically and chronologically, from a global studies unit on ancient Rome.

This lesson opens, if you are so inclined, with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on, unsurprisingly, the fall of Rome. If the lesson continues into a second day, then you might want this context clues worksheet on the verb submit, which is used both intransitively and transitively.

And, lastly for this, the tenth of ten posts (see below), here is the short reading and comprehension questions that are the principal work of this lesson.

That’s it. I hope this material is useful.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Rome in History and Geography

Here is the second lesson plan on Rome in history and geography, as above and below, of a ten-lesson unit on Rome. I opened this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the adjective byzantine, with a small b, which means, “of, relating to, or characterized by a devious and usually surreptitious manner of operation” and “intricately involved.” Should the lesson continue over two days (if I remember correctly, and I’m fairly certain I do, I intended this lesson to take two days to complete), then here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the proverb (which comes to us, apparently, from Saint Augustine), “When in Rome, Do as the Romans Do.”

And here is the reading with comprehension questions that is the primary work of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on the Founding Myth of Rome

This post begins, continuing for ten documents posts above (for a total of twenty posts including the interstitial quotes between each lesson), a ten-lesson unit on ancient Rome. Because the history of Rome offers so many opportunities to teach basic concepts in social studies, I dedicated an entire unit to it. I wanted students, when coming away from these ten lessons, to understand that when we talk about “the West” or “Western Civilization,” we are by and large talking about the world the Romans created.

So, this unit kicks off with this lesson plan on the founding myth of Rome, which is to say that this is a lesson about Romulus and Remus. I start this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the idiom “All Roads Lead to Rome.” Here is one more on another idiom based in Roman history, “Rubicon” as in “Crossing the Rubicon.” Finally, here is the reading on Romulus and Remus with a series of comprehension questions.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, July 31, 2020

This week’s Text is a lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Watch Out!” I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on Shakespeare’s famous line, from The Merchant of Venice, that “The quality of mercy is not strain’d.”

To conduct your investigation, you’ll need the PDF of the illustration and questions that constitute the evidence of the crime. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key so that you can solve the case.

That’s it. Stay cool, stay safe, have a nice weekend!

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Rasputin

If you can use it, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Russian mystic Rasputin, the debauched monk who hastened the exit of the Romanov Dynasty from the stage of history.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on the Greco-Roman Social

This lesson plan on the Greco-Roman social is the eleventh–see below–or an eleven-lesson unit on the origins of religion and philosophy. I grabbed this from a social studies teacher with whom I worked for several years in Lower Manhattan. The raw documents, which I typed and formatted Microsoft Word, looked like they came from someplace on the Internet similar to Mark’s Text Terminal.

In any case, I attached this Cultural Literacy worksheet on Aesop’s fables as wells as this one on the idiom “When in Rome, Do as the Romans Do” as openers for this lesson, which can easily go for two or even three days. In order to get this activity started, you’re students will need this list of participants in the social and the student worksheet and organizer that will serve as their dance card, so to speak, in this activity. I’ll include this teacher’s copy of the list of participants in the Greco-Roman social as well. I regret that the page numbers given for the readings are for a long-forgotten textbook that my co-teacher and I used for this enterprise. It shouldn’t be hard to replace my page numbers with those from whatever textbook your district uses for globals studies and geography.

As I worked my way through posting this unit,  I realized I wanted these lessons to span two days so I could get a look at kids’ short-term memories, whether something they’d read the day before remained with them, and if they could apply that knowledge the next day. This guided my planning and suggested to me what I might do in the way of support for the students I served. Let me reiterate once more than these lessons are the basis for a series of lessons that I recut every year to fit the fashions of the New York State Global Studies and Geography Regents Examination.

In the final analysis, I see a lot of room for improvement in these lessons. You probably will too. Remember that just about everything you download from Mark’s Text Terminal is in Microsoft Word, so you may alter this material to your students’ and your own needs.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Socrates

This lesson plan on Socrates (as above and below) is the seventh of an eleven-lesson global studies unit on the origins of religion and philosophy. This is a lesson, owing to Socrates’ importance to methods of inquiry (as well as informing my own teaching practice, which is something I wanted students to understand and take away from this lesson), was definitely designed to unfold over at least two days if possible.

I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concept of a faction; for the second day of the lesson, here is a context clues worksheet on the noun justice. Here are the reading on Socrates and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet that are the primary work for this lesson. Here, also, is a shorter worksheet that I intended either for a class that struggled with the longer reading, or to use as independent practice (i.e. homework).

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Hinduism

This lesson plan on Hinduism is the fourth lesson in a eleven-lesson global studies unit on the origins of religions and philosophy. I think I planned the do-nows as part of the lesson because there are three of them: the first is a context clues worksheet on the noun class, used in the sense of social class; the second is another context clues worksheet, this one on the noun monsoon; the third short exercise is this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concept of reincarnation.

And here is the reading and comprehension questions that are the center of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Munich Pact

Several years ago, during a round of professional development at the school in which I was serving, a group of social studies teachers reviewed the results of our students’ performance on the New York State Global Studies and Geography Regents Examination. They found a high incidence of error on questions related to Neville Chamberlain’s appeasement of Adolf Hitler in 1938. I took that as my cue to develop materials to address this issue–the first document was this context clues worksheet on the transitive verb appease.

This Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Munich Pact, in which Chamberlain’s pandering to Hitler may also be useful in ensuring students understand this key moment in global history.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.