Tag Archives: Cultural Literacy

Cultural Literacy: Mesopotamia

This Cultural Literacy worksheet on Mesopotamia would be useful in a number of lessons, I would think. Interestingly, as I was preparing this post yesterday, this item popped up in my Google news feed.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Nirvana

On a Tuesday morning, let me put out this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Buddhist concept of Nirvana. Depending on whom you’re teaching, this might be high-interest material for teenagers who are fans of the rock band Nirvana.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Hiroshima

In Mark’s Text Terminal’s ongoing observation of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2019, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Hiroshima and the tragedy one nuclear bomb visited on that city.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Dead Languages

Once upon a time I possessed sufficient ignorance and moral certainty to rail against “dead languages,” to wit Greek and Latin, and their valorization for their part in the “Western Canon.” On some level, I still think valorization of the “Western Canon” is mistaken, but so do I think that about the idea of “dead languages.” My own comments on dead languages ended when I discovered, to my surprise and chagrin, that Greek and Latin are very much alive in the roots of the English language.

Anyway, if you’d like your students to understand this, perhaps this Cultural Literacy worksheet on dead languages will help.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

 

Cultural Literacy: Dante

Here, on a busy Wednesday morning, is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Dante (Alighieri) if you can find a place for it, say, in a unit on the Italian Renaissance.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Agriculture as a Cause of History

Over the four years this blog has existed, one of the most heavily retrieved items posted here has been these context clues worksheets for the words agriculture and agrarian. Agriculture is a big concept with a lot of porous surfaces that make it easy to transfer across domains of knowledge. In any case, to understand how our species arrived at its present level of development, understanding agriculture remains essential.

So, here is a lesson plan on agriculture as a cause of history. Because students have already, in previous lessons, encountered the noun agriculture (see the context clues worksheets above), I start this lesson right after a class change with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on hunting and gathering societies. It happens that this document is really the mainstay of this lesson, because this worksheet on agriculture as a cause of history is really more in the way of what administrators and teachers now call an “exit ticket.”

If that is insufficient for you needs, here is a body of text on agriculture and the agricultural revolution to use to create a longer worksheet, an independent practice worksheet, or whatever is best for your students’ needs in developing their own understanding of agriculture and its role in history.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: The Catcher in the Rye

Here, on a damp and mild Sunday morning, is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on The Catcher in the Rye if you need it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.