Tag Archives: Cultural Literacy

Cultural Literacy: Bangladesh

Here, on one of the last Monday mornings of the 2017-2018 school year, is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Bangladesh. Incidentally, if you get down to Lower Manhattan, I recommend most of the excellent Bengali food carts down here.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Salman Rushdie

On this Thursday morning, Mark’s Text Terminal offers you this Cultural Literacy worksheet on Salman Rushdie.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Yin and Yang

On a Tuesday morning, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concepts of yin and yang.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: The Transcontinental Railroad

As the year winds down, I find myself very busy trying to keep kids in the classroom and engaged, rather than across the street in Zuccotti Park and…. I was going to say disengaged, but that’s not quite it; they’re just not engaged in things that I need them to be.

In any case, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the construction of the Transcontinental Railroad, much of the work of which, as is relatively common knowledge (I hope), was done by Chinese immigrant labor.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: The Ottoman Empire

There aren’t many Monday mornings left in the school year; while I dislike, as my dear friend Tom calls it, “wishing my life away,” I am looking forward to the summer, ergo the end of the school year. Who isn’t at this point in the year?

Anyway, on this Monday morning, here is a Cultural Literacy Worksheet on the Ottoman Empire.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Genghis Khan

As I mentioned in yesterday’s post, May 1st begins Asian Pacific American Heritage Month. Initially, I was concerned that I lacked significant materials to observe the month properly; however, upon review of the Text Terminal Archives, I find that I have an abundance of materials to offer in observation of it.

So, let’s start with this Cultural Literacy Worksheet on Genghis Khan. As a college professor of mine once put it, he was an “industrious fellow.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, April 27, 2018

It’s Friday again, so it’s time for another Weekly Text.  This week I offer a complete lesson plan on using the personal pronoun in the possessive case. I begin this lesson with this short exercise on the homophones to, too, and two; in the event the lesson runs into a second day, I keep this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the rhetorical question in reserve. The mainstay of this lesson is this structured, scaffolded worksheet on using the personal pronoun in the possessive case. Here, also, is the teacher’s copy of the worksheet to help you get through the lesson. Finally, here is a learning support on pronouns and case that both your and your students might find useful for this lesson–and elsewhere.

That’s it. It finally feels like spring here, so it’s one of the best times of year her in the Big Apple. On second thought, though, aren’t all the seasons marvelous here?

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.