Monthly Archives: February 2018

On Human Development and Social Change

“It is historically and biologically true that there can be no birth and growth without birth and growing pains. Whenever there is the emergence of the new we confront the recalcitrance of the old. So the tensions we witness in the world today are indicative of the fact that a new world order is being born and an old order is passing away.”

Martin Luther King, Jr., Address at First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change, Montgomery, Alabama, 3 December 1956

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

The Weekly Text, February 23, 2018

This is the last Friday of Black History Month, 2018, so this is by definition the final Weekly Text for the month. I’m actually publishing this from my phone, since I am away from New York (but on an Amtrak train on my way back right this minute).

Here is a reading on Archbishop Desmond Tutu, one of the great men of my lifetime. You might be able to use this comprehension sheet which accompanies the reading. Finally, here is an Everyday Edit on Martin Luther King, Jr. (and you can get lots more Everyday Edits from the good people at Education World.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

No

I’m a teacher in a public high school. I will not carry a gun in my classroom.

Subject and Object

“We didn’t land on Plymouth Rock, my brothers and sisters, Plymouth Rock landed on us.”

Malcolm X, The Autobiography of Malcolm X

 Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

 

Cultural Literacy: Nelson Mandela

Here is a Cultural Literacy Worksheet on Nelson Mandela. I miss him.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Clifford Brown, 1930-1956

“U.S. jazz trumpeter and principal figure in the hard-bop idiom. Born in Wilmington, Delaware, he became the most influential trumpeter of his generation, inspired by Fats Navarro to combine technical brilliance with lyrical grace in his playing. After touring with Lionel Hampton’s big band in 1953, he worked with Art Blakey; in 1954 he and drummer Max Roach formed a quintet that became one of the outstanding groups in modern jazz. He died in a car crash at age 25.”

Excerpted from: Stevens, Mark A., Ed. Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Encyclopedia. Springfield, Massachusetts: Merriam-Webster, 2000.

Cultural Literacy: Jazz

You might find that this Cultural Literacy worksheet on Jazz nicely complements the post on the late, great Clifford Brown above it. “Brownie,” as his friends and colleagues called him, was a major influence in the genre and still an unmitigated joy to hear.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.