Category Archives: Lesson Plans

Lesson plans on topics in social studies and English, as well as what I call “learning methods focus”–lessons that use the content area to demonstrate a particular method for learning that might assist struggling students.

The Weekly Text, July 21, 2017

This week’s Text is a complete lesson plan on using the degrees of adjectives. To refresh your memory, the three degrees of adjectives are the positive (big), the comparative (bigger) and the superlative, (biggest). Two do-now exercises open this unit, the first a parsing sentences worksheet on verbs and the second a Cultural Literacy Worksheet on acronyms. (I include as a matter of course two do-now exercises in the event that a lesson runs into a second day because of interruptions.) The mainstay of the lesson is this scaffolded worksheet on using the three degrees of adjectives. You may also want to use this learning support on the degrees of adjectives. Finally, you might find the teacher’s copy of the worksheet useful while giving this lesson.

Finally, this lesson affords you an opportunity, should you care to emphasize it, to point out to students that they will always, after the comparative adjective, use the conjunction than and not the adverb then.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, July 7, 2017

One week into the summer break, and I am taking advantage of everything New York City has to offer in this season, including the wonderful Jazzmobile, one of the greatest cultural institutions in our city, which obviously boasts so many of them. If you’re coming into the Five Boroughs from elsewhere, please know this: Jazzmobile concerts are free, held in some of our most beautiful parks, and superlative. If you go, make sure you put a few bucks in the collection bucket. Jazzmobile presents world-class musicians, and to see them in a club like the Village Vanguard or the Blue Note would cost you real money.

OK, now back to the English Language Arts Desk. This week’s Text is a complete lesson plan on adverbs modifying verbs. This lesson begins with one of two do-now exercises (or both if the lesson runs into a second day), the first a Cultural Literacy Worksheet on stereotypes, and the second a parsing sentences worksheet on adverbs. You might find this word bank of adverbs useful as a learning support. The mainstay of the lesson is this scaffolded worksheet on adverbs modifying verbs. Finally, you may find this teacher’s copy of the worksheet helps you in delivering this lesson.

That’s it. I hope you are enjoying your summer.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

An Early Summer, Midweek Text

A couple of days ago I posted a context clues worksheet on the adjective abstract. For high school students, especially the college bound, this is a key concept and word.

To take it further, here is a lesson plan on concrete and abstract nouns. To begin this lesson, you might want to use (that is, if you don’t incorporate the aforementioned context clues worksheet on abstract, which I should probably do myself), you might find this Everyday Edit worksheet on The Empire State useful. This scaffolded worksheet on using concrete and abstract nouns is the mainstay of the lesson; this teacher’s copy of the worksheet will make the lesson a bit easier to deliver.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, June 23, 2017

Summer break is nigh upon us here in New York City, and not a moment too soon. For the past couple of weeks we have endured the inanity of the New York State Regents Examinations.

This week’s Text is a complete lesson on using the predicate adjective in declarative sentences. There are two do-now worksheets to accompany this lesson in the event that the lesson runs into two days: the first is an Everyday Edit on Laura Ingalls Wilder; the second is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the common Latinism in English, nota bene. This lesson also provides a a word bank of predicate adjectives that serves as a learning support. You’ll need this scaffolded worksheet on the predicate adjectives for your students; to deliver this lesson, I find it’s handy to have this teacher’s copy and answer key.

That’s it. I hope this is useful to you.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, June 2, 2017

OK: It has been some time since I posted an entire lesson plan, so for this week’s Text I offer a complete lesson that introduces students to prepositions. This lesson begins with two (the second one in the event that the lesson runs to two days) do-now exercises, namely Everyday Edits worksheets, the first one on the Surrender at Appomattox and the the second one on the Modern Olympic Games. (Incidentally, if you like these Everyday Edit Worksheets, the good people at Education World give them away at their site, and you will find the answer keys to them there as well.)

The mainstay of this lesson is this scaffolded proofreading and cloze exercise worksheet that introduces students to prepositions and their uses. Here is a learning support on prepositions that accompanies this lesson (and all six lessons in this unit, which I will post over time, I suppose). Finally, here is a teacher’s copy and answer key to assist you as you deliver this lesson.

That’s it. If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, April 7, 2017

After posting nine weeks of readings for Black History Month and Women’s History Month, I’m pleased to offer, as this week’s Text, a complete lesson plan on descriptive and limiting adjectives. As with most of the lessons I write, there are two short do-now exercises to begin this lesson: the first is a parsing sentences worksheet for verbs and the second is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on idiom. The mainstay of this lesson is a scaffolded worksheet on descriptive and limiting adjectives. If your students are anything like those I serve, then you will very likely find useful this learning support which you might want to edit or otherwise rearrange. Finally, to help you guide your students through this lesson, here is the teacher’s copy of the worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, January 13, 2017

It’s Friday the thirteenth, and time for another Weekly Text. I’ve begun revising my unit on adverbs, so this week, I offer you a lesson plan that introduces students to adverbs.

Like most if not all of the lessons I post here, I’ve prepared this one to take place over two days, given the contingencies of attention issues, disruptive behavior, and the like. So, there are two do-now exercises to open this lesson: the first is this do-now Cultural Literacy Worksheet on run-on sentences; the second is a context clues worksheet on the adjective superlative. (It’s worth mentioning in passing that this word is also used to describe the utmost degree of adjectives; some time ago I posted the introductory lesson of my adjectives unit, and over time I’ll post the entire unit, one lesson of which covers the degrees–synthetic, comparative, and superlative–of adjectives, so this do-now exercise might also serve you well in that capacity.)

The mainstay of the lesson is a scaffolded worksheet on understanding adverbs and their use. I imagine you will find the teachers’copy/answer key for the worksheet.

That’s it until next week.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.