Monthly Archives: June 2020

Adverbial Phrase

“Adverbial Phrase: A phrase that functions as an adverb. Landon laughs with abandon.”

Excerpted from: Strunk, William Jr., and E.B. White. The Elements of Style, Fourth Edition. New York: Longman, 2000.

Parse (vi/vt)

It was Merriam-Webster’s word of the day yesterday, so here is a context clues worksheet on the verb parse, which is used both intransively and transitively. Given the number of parsing sentences worksheets I’ve drafted over the years, I still can’t figure out how I never created an instrument for introducing the verb parse to students. 

Anyway, here is is now; better late than never.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Rousseau on the Necessity of Education

“We are born weak, we have need of help; we are born destitute of everything, we stand in need of assistance; we are born stupid, we have need of understanding. All that we are not possessed of at our birth, and which we require when we grow up, is bestowed upon us by education.”

Jean Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778)

Excerpted from: Howe, Randy, ed. The Quotable Teacher. Guilford, CT: The Lyons Press, 2003.

Neurosis

None of us know, I guess, what’s going to happen with schools opening in the fall. Even with the best case scenario, opening schools is a dicey proposition. In any case, health teachers or just about anyone in a classroom come September, you may find this reading on neurosis and its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet useful for helping your students understand their feelings.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Adverb

“Adverb: A word that modifies or otherwise qualifies a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. Gestures gracefully; exceptionally quiet engine.”

Excerpted from: Strunk, William Jr., and E.B. White. The Elements of Style, Fourth Edition. New York: Longman, 2000.

Perceive (vt), Perception (n), Perceptive (adj)

Here are three context clues worksheets on the verb perceive, the noun perception, and the adjective perceptive. Because there are three parts of speech represented here, I try to use these in the classroom as chronologically close to each other as possible. Also, nota bene please that the verb perceive is only used transitively.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Term of Art: Social Fact

Social Fact: A complex notion, with attributes of externality, constraint, and ineluctability. It is to be understood within the context of Emile Durkheim’s conception of collective conscience and collective representations. Social facts are ways of acting which emanate from collectively elaborated and therefore authoritative rules, maxims, and practices, both religious and secular. Norms and institutions are examples of social facts in more or less solidified forms. They constitute practices of the group taken collectively and thus impose themselves and are internalized by the individual. Because they are collectively elaborated they are moral and therefore constrain individual behavior. The interesting problem for sociologists concerns the gap between the ideal representations and the material social organizations and their constituent actions—as, for example, between the socially approved forms and the actual practice.

Excerpted from: Marshall, Gordon, ed. Oxford Dictionary of Sociology. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.

Cultural Literacy: Mixed Economy

I’m not sure if high-school economics class get to the point of discussing them (when I worked and at an economics and finance themed high school, the topic never came up, which may mean something), but if one somewhere does, than here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concept of a mixed economy.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Formalism

“Formalism:  A central tenet of modernist art criticism that emphasized the importance of line, color, and space (significant form). Representational content was considered irrelevant in the eyes of formalist critics. Since formalism provided ‘objective’ methods for looking at all art whether Western or not, ancient or contemporary, it was thought of as egalitarian. But the advent of Pop Art necessitated a different analysis that went beyond the work itself and examined influences from popular culture. Postmodern approaches to art-making and criticism investigate both form and content, as well as the context of art and its role in society.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

The Weekly Text, June 26, 2020

This week’s Text is a lesson plan on the Latin word roots magn, magna, and magni. They mean great and large and are very productive in English. I open this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the adjective voluminous. Voluminous, as you most likely understand, means (among other things) “having or marked by great volume or bulk.” I chose this word for this lesson to offer both a hint about what the three roots here under study mean, but also to supply a near synonym. Finally, here is the scaffolded worksheet at the center of this lesson’s work.

Happy Friday! Wash your hands, wear a mask, stay safe.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.