Tag Archives: professional development

Term of Art: Resource Room

“A room where students (usually in special education) who need extra help may go during regular class time. The resource room teacher may have special education and/or bilingual credentials and may provide one-on-one instruction or teach a subject to the students as a group.”

Excerpted from: Ravitch, Diane. EdSpeak: A Glossary of Education Terms, Phrases, Buzzwords, and Jargon. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2007.

Term of Art: Essentialism

“A movement that began in the late 1930s and was led by William C. Bagley, a leading teacher educator and educational psychologist at Teachers College, Columbia University. Essentialism emphasized high-quality curriculum for all students, teachers as knowledgeable authorities in the classroom, and strong teaching profession rooted in high-quality teacher education. Bagley and other Essentialists opposed progressive ideas, such as child-centered classrooms and the assertion that problem solving should replace academic subject matter.”

Excerpted from: Ravitch, Diane. EdSpeak: A Glossary of Education Terms, Phrases, Buzzwords, and Jargon. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2007.

Language, Learning, and Social Integration

“Verbal communication is the basis for everything that occurs in classrooms, whether this is the delivery of new information or the regulation of behavior. Although language skills are biologically primary, their development in children of the same age can be highly uneven, Further, a significant proportion of children in any class may have developmental language disorders, which may or may not have been formally diagnosed. Such disorders typically impact a student’s success with written or spoken language.”

Ashman, Greg, and Pamela Snow. “Oral Language Competence: How it Relates to Classroom Behavior.” American Educator Vol. 43, No. 2 (Summer 2019): 37-41.

Anachronism

“(Greek ‘back-timing’) In literature anachronisms may be used deliberately to distance events and to underline a universal sense of verisimilitude and timelessness—to prevent something being ‘dated.’ Shakespeare adopted this device several times. Two classic examples are the references to the clock in Julius Caesar and to billiards in Antony and Cleopatra. Shaw also does it Androcles and the Lion when the Emperor is referred to as ‘The Defender of the Faith.’”

Excerpted from: Cuddon, J.A. The Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory. New York: Penguin, 1992.

12 Months of the French Republican Calendar

“Vendemiaire (grape harvest) * Brumaire (fog) * Frimaire (frost) * Nivose (snowy) * Pluviose (rainy) * Ventose (Windy) * Germinal (germination) * Floreal (flower) * Prairial (pasture) * Messidor (Harvest) * Thermidor (heat) * Fructidor (fruit)

This calendar was part of a reform movement to make over the world into a rational yet poetic place. Its first month, Vendemiaire (from the Latin for ‘grape harvest) started the day after the autumn equinox, which was neat, for it was also the day after the abolition of the monarchy on Year 1 of the Republic, 22 September, 1792.

The poet-journalist Fabre d’Eglantine was called in to advise the calendar committee on the naming of the months. They were to be exactly thirty days long, composed of three ten-day long weeks, each ending with a decadi as the day of rest. Days were to be composed of just ten hours (so 144 of our current minutes) abnd each hour was divided into 100 minutes and each minute into 100 seconds. The whole reformed calendar lasted for twelve years, from 1793 to 1805, though the week and hour reforms never took off beyond the political periphery of Paris. It was revived for another eighteen days during the Paris Commune of 1871. It was ridiculed by the British, who nicknamed the Republican Calendar with its four formal seasons: Wheezy, Sneezy and Freezy; Slippy, Drippy and Nippy; Showery, Flowery and Bowery; Wheaty, Heaty and Sweety.”

Excerpted from: Rogerson, Barnaby. Rogerson’s Book of Numbers: The Culture of Numbers–from 1,001 Nights to the Seven Wonders of the World. New York: Picador, 2013.

Term of Art: Fine Motor Skills

“The use of small muscle groups for specific tasks such as handwriting. Fine motor skills are developmental, with children generally improving in their ability to use writing or drawing implements as the enter elementary school and are introduced to the concept of writing and copying. Deficits in fine motor function can have a detrimental effect on the development of writing skills.”

Excerpted from: Turkington, Carol, and Joseph R. Harris, PhD. The Encyclopedia of Learning Disabilities. New York: Facts on File, 2006.

Term of Art: Listening Vocabulary

“The number of words a person understands when they are heard in speech; also, hearing vocabulary, sometimes called ‘receptive vocabulary.'”

Excerpted from: Turkington, Carol, and Joseph R. Harris, PhD. The Encyclopedia of Learning Disabilities. New York: Facts on File, 2006.