Tag Archives: United States History

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Given that June 6 was the 75th anniversary of D-Day, this reading on Dwight D. Eisenhower and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet are a day late and a dollar short.

Better late than never, I guess.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Draft Riots

Now seems like a perfect time to post this reading on the draft riots in New York City in 1863 and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. These events were, among other things, an outbreak of racist violence that included the arson against the Colored Orphan Asylum on Fifth Avenue in Midtown Manhattan.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Winston Churchill

OK, moving right along this beautiful June morning in Vermont, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Winston Churchill. Unlike most of the Cultural Literacy worksheets you’ll find on Mark’s Text Terminal, this one is a full page; it can be used for independent practice (homework, to the layperson), or even in the classroom.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Boss Tweed

OK, for my erstwhile colleagues in New York City, the next time a student asks you why the Tweed Courthouse (still home to the New York City Department of Education, as far as I know), you might find useful this reading on Boss Tweed and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. William Marcy Tweed (“Boss”) incidentally, is buried under a relatively ostentatious stone in Green-wood Cemetery in Brooklyn. Tweed’s middle name suggests that he is a member of, or at least a scion of, the same Marcy family that gave us William L. Marcy. Chances are good that this is how Marcy Avenue in Brooklyn got its name.

Perhaps making the connections in this lineage of people and place names would be a worthy endeavor for an inquisitive student? I’m just asking.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Generation of ’68

Finally–and again, after the abject horror of yesterday in the United States–I’ll post this reading on reading on The Generation of ’68 and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet without further comment.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Lend-Lease Act

If ever this country needed creative, innovative thinking to solve complex problems, it is now. Unfortunately (I was going to say arguably, and perhaps it is arguable, though I personally don’t see how), our nation has devolved into an Idiocracy, so the feature film of that name, once a comedy, is now a documentary.

However, if you’d like your students to learn to think flexibly and imaginatively, perhaps this reading on the Lend-Lease Act will serve as an example of such cognition. Here is the vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet that accompanies it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Harry S Truman on Politics as a Vocation

“My choice early in life was either to be a piano player in a whorehouse or a politician. And to tell the truth, there’s hardly any difference.”

Harry S Truman

Excerpted from: Winokur, Jon, ed. The Big Curmudgeon. New York: Black Dog & Leventhal, 2007.

Gilded Age

Alright, last but not least this beautiful spring morning is this reading on the Gilded Age along with its vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. I assume I don’t need to belabor the point that this reading could very well describe our own epoch.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Brooklyn Bridge

It was the biggest civil engineering project in the history of the world when it was built, so it has global significance. But whenever I post something like this reading on the Brooklyn Bridge and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet, I do so with my erstwhile New York City colleagues in mind. This is as much about the Roebling family, father and son, who designed and built the bridge–did you know that the day-to-day superintendency of the project fell to Emily Warren Roebling, the daughter-in-law of John Roebling, who began construction of the Brooklyn Bridge? There’s some women’s history to be extracted from this material for the right learner.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Capital Offense

OK, starting out on a very gray and chilly morning considering that it is May 12, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concept of a capital offense. Needless to say, this clears fruitful ground for a discussion of the consequence of a conviction for a capital offense, capital punishment, i.e. the death penalty.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.