Tag Archives: United States History

Cultural Literacy: Appalachian Mountains

Mark’s Text Terminal is about to move to another state, so I spent the day dealing with that. Here, as I wind things down, is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Appalachian Mountains.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Fidel Castro on Cuba’s Propinquity to the United States

“You Americans keep saying that Cuba is ninety miles from the United States. I say that the United States in ninety miles from Cuba and for us, that is worse.”

Fidel Castro, quoted in Herbert L. Matthews, Castro: A Political Biography (1969)

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

The Mexican War

It’s pouring rain in The Bronx. Here is a reading on the Mexican War with a comprehension worksheet to attend it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: The Mexican War

Alright, here is the penultimate post on this Saturday morning, the first day of Hispanic Heritage Month 2018: a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Mexican War.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Independent Practice: The Age of Exploration

Here are two independent practice worksheets on the the Age of Exploration, the historical event that was a catastrophe for indigenous Americans and a bonanza for the Spanish and Portuguese explorers who “discovered” the Americas, and in any case gave birth to the Latin American world.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Abraham Lincoln

Today is September 1. It’s Emma Nutt Day, in celebration of the Ms Nutt’s post as the first female telephone operator in the world. In Slovakia, today is Constitution Day.  It’s also Independence Day in Uzbekistan, celebrating that nation’s independence from the Soviet Union.

Maybe you can use this reading on Abraham Lincoln. If so, then here is the reading comprehension worksheet that accompanies it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Commodore Matthew Perry and Japan

If you teach global studies or world history, I expect you might be able to use this reading on Commodore Perry and Japan and the comprehension worksheet that attends it. When I taught sophomore global studies for the first time last year, I was surprised to learn that the curriculum the administration of my school prescribed didn’t introduce students to the key concept implicit in this material, namely gunboat diplomacy.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.