Tag Archives: learning supports

A Learning Support on Using Infinitives

Here is a learning support on using infinitives in sentences. You know that to form of a verb, as in to install, to defenestrate (defenestration is the Word of the Day today at Merriam-Webster) and to stir. I’m working a range of new materials on using gerunds and infinitives in sentences–they’ll soon begin to appear here–and realized I needed a support on infinitives.

So here it is.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Learning Support on Writing the Imperative Sentence

Here is a learning support on writing the imperative sentence. This type of clause, as you know, issues an imperative, i.e. “the grammatical mood that expresses the will to influence the behavior of another.”

I wrote this document myself, synthesizing a variety of sources. I tried to keep this short, while integrating all the essential elements of this kind of construction–e.g. saying “please” when using an imperative sentence in speech or prose.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Learning Support on Writing the Interrogative Sentence

Here is a learning support on writing the interrogative sentence. This is something I assembled myself using a variety of sources; it’s lengthy–two full pages of text with a number of examples.

In my experience, students struggle to write interrogative sentences. This points to a much bigger problem (and perhaps a fundamental failing in our educational systems and pedagogy) that I seek on a daily basis to solve in my classroom: students don’t really know how to ask questions. Since all learning begins with a question, this troubles me greatly, which is why I worked assiduously to create a support that would answer all students’ questions about, well, asking questions. I know I ask for this at the bottom of every documents post, but I would be especially grateful to you for your comments on this document.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, 30 July 2021: A Lesson Plan on the Reflexive and Intensive Pronoun

This week’s text is a lesson plan on the reflexive and intensive pronouns–i.e. myself, yourself, herself, himself, itself, ourselves, yourselves, and themselves–and their use in declarative sentences and expository prose.

I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the bibliography and its function in scholarly writing. In the event the lesson goes into a second day due to whatever classroom exigencies you encounter, you might want to use this Everyday Edit worksheet on Miranda rights (“You have the right to remain silent…” etc.) that the United States Constitution guarantees people when they are arrested. (Incidentally if you like Everyday Edit worksheets, don’t forget that the good people at Education World offer a year’s supply of them at no charge.)

Here is a learning support on reflexive and intensive pronouns that I distribute with this scaffolded worksheet that is the primary work of this lesson. Finally, here is the teacher’s copy of the worksheet that eases delivery of this material.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Learning Support on Writing the Compound Sentence with a Semicolon and No Conjunction

Here is a learning support on writing the compound sentence with a semicolon and no conjunction. This is a full page of text, but like everything else here, you can do with it as you wish: it is formatted in Microsoft Word.

I have a lesson plan in the works on this piece of procedural knowledge, so check back if this is something you want your students to be able to do.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Learning Support on Gerunds and Pronouns

Here is a learning support on gerunds and pronouns. This is about a half-page of text, so there is room (and the latitude, since, like just about everything on this blog, this is a Microsoft Word document you can manipulate for your particular use) to make a worksheet of this should you see fit.

Basically, the text here explains the proper use of possessive pronouns following gerunds. It’s both simple and complicated at once, but as Paul Brians explains (this is drawn from his book Common Errors in English Usage), the advice in the passage will improve the quality of student writing.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Learning Support on Single Quotation Marks

OK, on a rainy Sunday morning, here is a learning support on using single quotation marks. This is another piece of text culled from Paul Brians’ fine usage guide, Common Errors in English Usage, which you’ll find in its entirety on the Washington State University website under that hyperlink. The textual passage is a single, short paragraph. So there is a wide field for turning this into a worksheet, should you want or need to do so; as is mostly the case on Mark’s Text Terminal, this is a Microsoft Word document, so you can adapt it in any number of ways (including exporting it to another word processor) should you wish.

I don’t know about you, but I tend to be a stickler on this punctuation rule. In fact, it got me into trouble with a principal who didn’t understand the typographical rules and conventions for using double and single quotation marks; I l left an explanation of them, from a different style guide, in his mailbox after reading yet another of his cluttered, illegible memos. He didn’t appreciate it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Learning Support on Using Quotation Marks

Here is a learning support on using quotation marks. This is quite a bit of text, some of which, especially the material on typography and word processing software, but that’s only a paragraph, so you’re still stuck with a two-page document.

In any case, this is, to flog this tiresome point again, a Microsoft Word document. In other words, you can do just about anything you want with it. I can see how it could be broken into several pieces and those pieces made into practice worksheets. It’s yours now.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Learning Support on the Use of Parentheses

Here is a learning support on the use of parentheses. I’ve published quite a few of these recently; they have all been excerpted from Paul Brians’ book Common Errors in English Usage, which he has posted at the Washington State University website.

This document is really only a paragraph of text, so there is a big blank field on the page. In other words, plenty of room to write some exercises for students to practice using parentheses correctly. Because it is a Microsoft Word document, you have plenty of ways to convert it to your favorite word processor and adapt it for the needs of your classroom.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Learning Support on Using Hyphens and Dashes

Here is a learning support on using hyphens and dashes. If you scroll down about 17 posts below this one, you’ll find another learning support simply on hyphenation. As always, Paul Brians does a nice job of presenting the key issues on these forms of punctuation.

Incidentally, if you like Paul Brians’ work, stay tuned here for more of it; I drafted a little over one hundred worksheets using text from his book Common Errors in English Usage–which Professor Brians, amazingly, has made available in its entirety on the Washington State University website. Just punch that hyperlink–and you’re there!

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.