Tag Archives: art/architecture/design

Pablo Picasso on God as an Artist

“God is really only another artist. He invented the giraffe, the elephant, and the cat. He has no real style. He just goes on trying other things.”

Pablo Picasso, quoted in Francoise Gilot and Carlton Lake, Life with Picasso (1964)

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

The Weekly Text, 16 September 2022, Hispanic Heritage Month Week I: Francisco Goya

Yesterday began Hispanic Heritage Month 2022, which occurs every year between September 15 and October 15. This year’s month contains five Fridays, so there will be five Weekly Texts such as today’s–i.e. readings and comprehension worksheets. Unfortunately, and to my chagrin, this will exhaust my supply of materials for this month where Weekly Texts are concerned. I have developed a number of shorter exercises to post while I figure something out for Fridays–i.e. Weekly Text day.

For now, here is a reading on Francisco Goya along with its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Modern Art

“Modern Art: In strict historical terminology, modern art began in the middle of the 19th century with the realism of Gustave Courbet. At that time, art began to free itself from the strict requirements of subject matter and developed increasingly toward preoccupation with form. In general, it also repudiated many of the techniques of pleasing the viewer devised by past canonical artists.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Cubism

Here is a reading on Cubism along with its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. I can’t think of anything more to say about this–other than the audience for this, given the state of arts education in our schools these days, might end up being entirely self-selected.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Elbert Hubbard on Editors

“Editor: A person employed on a newspaper whose business it is to separate the wheat from the chaff and to see that the chaff is printed.”

Elbert Hubbard

Excerpted from: Winokur, Jon, ed. The Big Curmudgeon. New York: Black Dog & Leventhal, 2007.

Manifesto

“Manifesto: A term closely associated with the Avant-Garde Modernists and used primarily during the 20th century. Often the work of writers rather than artists, manifestos were published to proclaim new or revolutionary movements that spanned the arts, as in the Futurist and Surrealist manifestos.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Isocephaly

“Isocephaly: A method of composing groups of figures in such a way that all are shown at the same height, regardless of posture and purpose. Characteristic of classical Greek art.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Intrado

“Intrados: Inner surface of an arch.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Intonaco

“Intonaco: In fresco, the final coat of plaster on which the painter actually works, while it is still wet.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Intimism

“Intimism: The painting of intimate scenes, e.g. domestic interiors or objects associated with them. A type of genre practiced particularly by French painters like Pierre Bonnard and Edouard Vuillard.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.