Tag Archives: punctuation

Everyday Edit: Japan’s “Coming of Age Day”

Here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on Japan’s “Coming of Age Day.” If you like these worksheets then you are in luck! The generous people at Education World give away a yearlong supply of them, and if you dig a little deeper over there, you’ll find the answer keys as well.

 

Everyday Edit: Islamic Hajj

Here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on the Islamic Hajj to get kids thinking about our newest neighbors and to help them learn to revise prose. Don’t forget, please, that the good people at Education World give away a yearlong supply of these, free for the taking. I’ve used these to good effect for many years in my classrooms.

And if you find typos in this document, well, repair them! That is the point, after all, of an exercise such as this one.

A Complete Lesson Plan on Using the Predicate Pronoun

Here is a lesson plan on using the predicate pronoun. I open this lesson with this Everyday Edit worksheet on Anne Frank (and you can help yourself to a yearlong supply of these worksheets courtesy of the good people at Education World). Here is a learning support on pronouns to assist students in developing their own understanding of these words and their use in declarative sentences. This scaffolded worksheet is the center of this lesson; here is the teacher’s copy of the worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Everyday Edit: Hiroshima Bombing

Don’t forget that April is Asian Pacific American History Month. Mark’s Text Terminal takes pains to observe four themed history months (Hispanic Heritage, Black or African-American, Women’s, and Asian Pacific American) each year. You can link to materials related to any of these commemorations by using the tags in the word clouds at the top right of this site.

Here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on the bombing of Hiroshima.

To give credit where it is so abundantly due, please don’t forget that the generous people at Education World give away a entire year’s supply of Everyday Edit worksheets.

Everyday Edit: Hawaii, the 50th State

Moving right along this morning, here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on Hawaii, America’s 50th State.

And as always, to give credit where it is so abundantly due, you should know that the good people at Education World generously offer at no cost to you a yearlong supply of these documents. I’ve used them for many years in my classrooms, and they are first rate.

And if you find typos in this document, for heaven’s sake fix them! That’s the whole point here….

Everyday Edit: Yoshiko Uchida

In observation of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2020, here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on Yoshiko Uchida, the Japanese-American writer who suffered the indignity of internment in California during World War II (see above). Please don’t forget that the generous proprietors of the Education World website give away for the taking a yearlong supply of Everyday Edit worksheets. I’ve used these documents to very good effect in my classrooms over the years.

Everyday Edit: Sapporo Snow Festival

April is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, so for the next 30 days I’ll post a plethora of materials related to the history of Asia and Asians in global history. In fact, given that, like everyone else in the United States, I am essentially homebound, I will probably deplete all but the materials I use for Weekly Texts on Fridays.

To that end, here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on the Sapporo Snow Festival. If you find typos in this document, fix them! That’s the point of the exercise.

Because I always feel remiss anytime I fail to give credit where credit is due, let me remind you (as I will every time I post an Everyday Edit) that the good people at Education World post on their website, free for the taking, a yearlong supply of Everyday Edits. If we want students to write well–and I’m hard pressed to imagine why we wouldn’t–they need to learn to copyedit.