Tag Archives: Asian Pacific History

5 Confucian Blessings

“Longevity * Wealth * Health * Civility * A Natural Death

The Five Blessings can be symbolized by a peach—a very auspicious Chinese symbol, linked with wishes for long life (often expressed by the number 10,000, with is suggestion of infinity of immortality). An image of nine peaches and five bats (linked to a peach because they sound familiar) is therefore coloured with all sorts of suggestions about all these blessing.”

Excerpted from: Rogerson, Barnaby. Rogerson’s Book of Numbers: The Culture of Numbers–from 1,001 Nights to the Seven Wonders of the World. New York: Picador, 2013.

Lusterware

“Lusterware: A Middle Eastern luxury item brought to Spain in the late 10th century. Muslim artisans produced iridescent ceramic glazes that appeared as metallic silver, copper, or gold. In the 15th century lusterware tiles and dinnerware were commissioned throughout Europe by princes, cardinals, and popes. Decorative elements included their heraldic emblems along with Moorish signs and symbols.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

A Document-Based Questioning (DBQ) Lesson on The Pillow Book

Here is a DBQ lesson on The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon, a text whose fame has endured the centuries. This is the eighth lesson on a ten-lesson global studies unit on reading and interpreting primary historical documents.

Because the word appears in the text, I open this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the noun self-satisfaction, a fairly strong compound. If you move into a second day with this lesson–given the historical importance of the text, as well as the numerous concepts it contains, it might be appropriate–then here is another context clues worksheet on the adjective hateful, which also appears in the text.

And of course you’ll need the worksheet with the reading passage and comprehension questions to conduct this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Document-Based Questioning (DBQ) Lesson on the Rig Veda

Here is a DBQ lesson on the Hindu sacred text the Rig Veda, the first, as above and below, of a ten-lesson documents-based questions (DBQ) unit.

I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concept of symbols; in the event the lesson requires a second day to complete, then here is another on another on the epic as a poetic form. As I write this, I think perhaps the reading on epics probably ought to come first in the delivery of this lesson. Finally, here is the reading and comprehension worksheet that is the chief work of this lesson.

Incidentally, you might find this reading and comprehension worksheet on Hindu Epics complementary to this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Siddhartha Gautama as Buddha

This lesson plan on Siddhartha Gautama as Buddha is, as above and below, the fifth lesson of an eleven-lesson global studies unit on the origins of the religion and philosophy. I opened this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the adjective austere and include another on the noun cosmology in the event the lesson goes into a second day, as I think I assumed I would. Finally, here is the reading with comprehension questions that is the principal work of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Hinduism

This lesson plan on Hinduism is the fourth lesson in a eleven-lesson global studies unit on the origins of religions and philosophy. I think I planned the do-nows as part of the lesson because there are three of them: the first is a context clues worksheet on the noun class, used in the sense of social class; the second is another context clues worksheet, this one on the noun monsoon; the third short exercise is this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concept of reincarnation.

And here is the reading and comprehension questions that are the center of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Cyrus the Great and the Persian Empire

Next up: a lesson plan on Cyrus the Great and the Persian Empire. Like the previous lesson on Hammurabi’s Code, this one includes a trove of differentiated documents.

Let’s start with the do-now exercises, which for this lesson are two Cultural Literacy worksheets: the first is first is on xenophobia and the second is on the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

Now onto the documents that constitute the principal work of this lesson–there are two sets. Here the primary reading on Cyrus the Great along with its vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. There is only the slightest difference between the primary reading and this version of it, but this worksheet is shorter to attend it. I imagine (it has been a while) that I prepared the second versions of these documents for one student, but I cannot say that for sure.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Assyria and Babylon

Here is a lesson plan on Assyria and Babylon. To open this lesson, for some reason, I arranged three context clues worksheets. The first is on the adjective civil; the second is on the noun civilization, and here is one more on the noun coalition. Finally, here is the reading and comprehension questions that are at the center of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Second of Two Lessons on Sumer

Here is the second of two lessons on the ancient civilization of Sumer. I open this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the noun diasporaa nice solid noun for whose meaning students have asked after repeatedly over the years. Finally, here is the worksheet at the center of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The First of Two Lessons on Sumer

Starting with this post, and going up from here for a total of eleven documents posts (twenty-two if you count the interstitial quotes), I will publish an entire global studies unit. As I mentioned previously, especially below, where I posted the bulk of another global studies unit, I have, over the years, written and rewritten a number of global studies units as the New York State Global History and Geography Regents Examination changed. For this unit, I can’t remember, to paraphrase Lillian Hellman, how I cut the curriculum to fit that year’s fashion, only that I know that I changed these almost every year for ten years.

And, I am sorry to say, some of this isn’t exactly my best work. Units and lessons grow and mature over time. But when one must change the basic content or them every year (and I sometimes needed to do this for the needs of students, which is another story, and which I am much happier to do), units and lessons never have a chance to deepen, to mature. That loss of time to develop is the thing that primarily afflicts this unit. As I rewrite them, I kept the do-now exercises intact, so as I post these, you may see some repetition.

I considered throwing this material into the digital dumpster, but I can’t bring myself to do that. And, because I probably can continue to blog at the rate I do and not use up the storage I purchase from WordPress for this site for about 100 years, I don’t need to scrimp on uploading documents. Also, I’ve learned the hard way about throwing things away: the minute I do, I want or need them.

So, without further ado, here is first of two lessons on Sumer. Like another version of this lesson, I opened this one with this context clues worksheet on the verb banish; in the event that this lesson goes into a second day, here is another context clues worksheet, this one on the noun age, in the sense of “a period of time dominated by a central figure or prominent feature.” Finally, here is the worksheet with a reading and comprehension questions that is at the center of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.