Tag Archives: Asian Pacific History

Lao Tzu

This morning I’m working at designing materials for the aforementioned senior English Language Arts class–which I am in front of for the first time in my teaching career. To wit, I want to come up with a combination learning support/worksheet that will aid students in composing their college application essays–and if anyone has any good ideas about this, particularly if it is informed by experience relating and inculcating this kind of project, I would be much obliged.

I hit on the idea of making this into something along the lines of an English lesson on the cardinal virtues. After all, one of the key things one wants to demonstrate in a piece of writing like the college application essay, it seems to me, it is one’s own virtuous conduct. So I used the word “virtue” to perform a general Spotlight search of my computer for any materials I have related to this word and concept.

This reading on Lao Tzu emerged near the top of my list of results. Here is the comprehension worksheet that deepens understanding of the reading itself.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, September 7, 2018

As we go into the long Rosh Hashanah holiday weekend here in New York City, I’d like to wish my Jewish friends, colleagues, students, and neighbors a joyful and safe new year.

Apropo of the holiday (see below as well), here is a worksheet on Shimon Bar-Kokhba, a great Jewish warrior who fought against nearly impossible odds when he took on the Roman Empire under Hadrian. This comprehension worksheet accompanies it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Israel

Apropo of the upcoming holiday, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Israel.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Hagia Sophia

Wow. it’s August 31st. Where did the summer go? It’s Independence Day in Kyrgyzstan, another Central Asian nation that emerged from the wreckage of the Soviet Union in 1991. Today is Hari Merdeka in Malaysia, a celebration of that nation’s independence from Britain in 1957.

Here is a reading on the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, and the comprehension worksheet that accompanies it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Commodore Matthew Perry and Japan

If you teach global studies or world history, I expect you might be able to use this reading on Commodore Perry and Japan and the comprehension worksheet that attends it. When I taught sophomore global studies for the first time last year, I was surprised to learn that the curriculum the administration of my school prescribed didn’t introduce students to the key concept implicit in this material, namely gunboat diplomacy.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Ibn Rushd

Today is June 11. John Quincy Adams was born on this day in 1767. Today is, for some reason, Bowdler’s Day, named for Thomas Bowdler, the English physician who set out to remove what he considered profanity in Shakespeare’s works; we English speakers derive our transitive verb bowdlerize from his name. On this day in 1979, the United States’ spacecraft Skylab fell to earth. Today is the United Nations’ World Population Day.

Here is a reading on Ibn Rushd, also known as Averroes: he was a Muslim philosopher who commented extensively on Aristotle. He is prominently featured in Raphael’s famous painting The School of Athens. This reading comprehension worksheet accompanies the reading.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Tanka

“The classic form of Japanese poetry, fixed centuries ago, as five lines with 5, 7, 5, 7, 7 syllables. It reduces, through the strict limits of its form, all poetic raw materials to the concentrated essence of one static event, image, mood, etc. An example by Saigo Hoshi:

Now indeed I know
That when we said “remember”
And we swore it so,
It was in “we will forget”
That our thoughts most truly met.”

Excerpted from: Murphy, Bruce, ed. Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia, Fourth Edition. New York: Harper Collins, 1996.