Monthly Archives: August 2022

John Kenneth Galbraith on Meetings

“Meetings are indispensable when you don’t want to do anything.”

John Kenneth Galbraith

Excerpted from: Winokur, Jon, ed. The Big Curmudgeon. New York: Black Dog & Leventhal, 2007.

Common English Verbs Followed by Gerunds: Prohibit

Here is a worksheet on the verb prohibit as it is used with a gerund. The teacher prohibited making any more curricular materials of debatable value.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Intimism

“Intimism: The painting of intimate scenes, e.g. domestic interiors or objects associated with them. A type of genre practiced particularly by French painters like Pierre Bonnard and Edouard Vuillard.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

Isaac Newton

Here is a reading on Isaac Newton with its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. This is a solid introduction to Newton; I have used it as a prelude to framing the Enlightenment in global studies classes in New York City. Otherwise, editorially, I assume I need not belabor the importance of Isaac Newton in the history of the world, let alone the intellectual history of Western Europe.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Book of Answers: L’Encyclopedie

“Who edited L’Encyclopedie? Denis Diderot (17013-84), French philosopher. This compendium of knowledge was published in thirty-five volumes between 1751 and 1776. It was meant to cover all aspects of life and embodied the rationalistic ideals of the Enlightenment. Contributers included Voltaire, Montesquieu, and Rousseau.”

Excerpted from: Corey, Melinda, and George Ochoa. Literature: The New York Public Library Book of Answers. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1993.

Cultural Literacy: Bastille

It may be too brief, but if you can use it, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Bastille. This is a half-page worksheet with a reading of two sentences, one a longish compound separated by a semicolon, and three comprehension questions. Despite (or may because of) its brevity, it is a good general introduction to this hated edifice. It might therefore be a useful tool in introducing the French Revolution.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cacophony

“Cacophony (noun): Disagreeable or jarring sound; aural infelicity; discordance; babble or tumult. Adj. cacophonous; adv. cacophonously.

‘And always with an air of vast importance, always in the longest words possible, always in the most cacophonous English that even a professor ever wrote.’ H.L. Mencken, Prejudices: First Series”

Excerpted from: Grambs, David. The Random House Dictionary for Writers and Readers. New York: Random House, 1990.

Havoc (n)

Here is a context clues worksheet on the noun havoc, which means “wide and general destruction” “devastation,” and “great confusion and disorder.” The context clues in this worksheet point to both definitions, so students will very likely figure this out quickly.

Interestingly, while researching this post, I learned that havoc also has use as a transitive verb meaning “to lay waste” and “destroy.” Havoc is often used with active verbs like cause and of course the always dependable wreak–although please beware that contentious debate has broken over the past tense (wrought or wreaked?) of this verb.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Term of Art: Teachable Moment

“teachable moment: A confluence of experience and instruction that suddenly awakens student interest and gives life to what is taught. A teachable moment may occur as the result of a current event, of a school or classroom occurrence, or of something that happened to a student or a teacher. Suddenly, a concept that once seemed abstract becomes clear and important. Teachable moments may also occur between parents and children, as parents teach spontaneous everyday lessons about behavior, morals, ethics, and values.”

Excerpted from: Ravitch, Diane. EdSpeak: A Glossary of Education Terms, Phrases, Buzzwords, and Jargon. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2007.

The Weekly Text, 5 August 2022: A Lesson Plan for the Final Assessment of the Conjunctions Unit

Ok, here is the final lesson plan of the conjunctions unit, which is a sentence-writing review as a unit-concluding assessment. I open this lesson with this worksheet on the homophones peak and peek; if the unit goes into a second day (it very likely will, and perhaps even a third), here is an Everyday Edit the desegregation of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, which Melba Patillo Beals experienced first hand as one of the Little Rock Nine, and about which she has written eloquently.

This sentence-writing practice assessment worksheet is the final assessment for this unit.

And with this post, the entire cycle of units I wrote to teach the parts of speech is now available on Mark’s Text Terminal. I don’t know how many lessons in total it is, but if it is not 100, it’s close. I hope you find some or all of this material useful. After seven years of piecemeal posting of these materials, they’re all here.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.