Monthly Archives: March 2017

The Weekly Text, March 31, 2017: Women’s History Month Week V: A Reading and Comprehension Worksheet on Murasaki Shikibu

The last day of March is also the last day of Women’s History Month. This week’s Text is a reading on Murasaki Shikibu. Lady Shikibu wrote what is arguably history’s first novel, The Tale of Genji. Here is a comprehension worksheet to accompany the relatively short reading.

And that is the last Weekly Text for Women’s History Month. I hope they’ve been useful. Next week I’ll return to posting less theme oriented material; I think I have a grammar lesson queued up.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Learning Support for Pronominal Contractions

Because several of my students asked for it, here is a learning support on using pronoun contractions with the present tense of the verb to be.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Isolate (vt), Isolation (n), Isolationism (n)

It’s the time of year that the global studies class in which I am co-teacher studies the succession of Chinese dynasties. This unit necessitates a discussion of isolationism. My co-teacher asked me to prepare a context clues worksheet on the term, so I did. I think it’s necessary when teaching this word to begin with the verb isolate. This is one of those tricky polysemous words that has a different general meaning than say, in biology, chemistry, or even linguistics.

If you want your students to understand isolationism as a political and diplomatic term, then you might find useful these three context clues worksheets that begin with the verb isolate (and include the nouns isolation and isolationism). Also, here is a lexicon for these words for your class linguist.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Meager (adj)

Here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective meager.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Rotten Reviews: Wuthering Heights

“Here are all the faults of Jane Eyre (by Charlotte Bronte) are magnified a thousand fold, and the only consolation which we have in reflecting upon it is that it will never be generally read.”

James Lorimer, North British Review

“…wild, disjointed and improbable…the people who make up the drama, which is tragic enough in its consequences, are savages ruder than those who lived before the days of Homer.”

The Examiner

Excerpted from: Bernard, Andre, and Bill Henderson, eds. Pushcart’s Complete Rotten Reviews and Rejections. Wainscott, NY: Pushcart Press, 1998.

Utility (n)

Last week I posted a context clues worksheet, the reason for whose existence escaped me, on the noun utility in the sense of a service (as light, power or water) provided by a public utility. Here is a context clues on the other meaning of utility, which is to say either fitness for some purpose or worth to some end or something useful or designed for use. Unless you work at a economics-and-finance-themed high school like the one in which I serve, this is probably the better worksheet for you.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Helen Keller on the Excitement of Teaching

“Life is an exciting business, and most exciting when it is lived for others.”

Helen Keller (1880-1968)

Excerpted from: Howe, Randy, ed. The Quotable Teacher. Guilford, CT: The Lyons Press, 2003.

The Weekly Text, March 24, 2017: Women’s History Month 2017 Week IV–A Reading and Comprehension Worksheet on Elizabeth Cady Stanton

It seems to me safe to assume that Elizabeth Cady Stanton is a staple in any Women’s Studies Program. For this fourth and penultimate week of Women’s History Month, Mark’s Text Terminal therefore offers this reading on Elizabeth Cady Stanton as well as a comprehension worksheet to accompany it. I hope you find them useful.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Utility (n)

I can’t remember now why I wrote this context clues worksheet on the noun utility. Over the years, I’ve come to dislike intensely the verb utilize as a piece of bureaucratic jargon, so perhaps I wanted students to understand that when they see or hear that verb in action, they will understand it means to use. One of the meanings of utility, after all, is “fitness for some purpose or worth to some end” and “something useful or designed for use.”

However, utility, in this context clues worksheet, refers to its use in describing “a PUBLIC UTILITY, a service (as light, power, or water) provided by a public utility.” This is one of those polysemous words that I’m still working on a way of teaching with the least amount of time and effort, but that still helps students understand both the meanings of the word as well as an understanding of the concept of polysemy–and why it is often a challenge to building an academic vocabulary.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Rotten Reviews: The Good Earth

“Since Mrs. Buck does not understand the meaning of the Confucian separation of man’s kingdom from that of woman, she is like someone trying to write a story of the European Middle Ages without understanding the rudiments of chivalric standards and the institution of Christianity.”

New Republic

Excerpted from: Bernard, Andre, and Bill Henderson, eds. Pushcart’s Complete Rotten Reviews and Rejections. Wainscott, NY: Pushcart Press, 1998.