Monthly Archives: February 2019

Black History Month 2019: Coda

Earlier this week, NBC News ran this surprisingly frank and cogent piece on Black History Month. Under any circumstances, and particularly those in which I’ve spent the past 16 years working, I’ve never found satisfying the idea of a single month for Black History; as this feature rightly observes, in the not particularly humble opinion of Mark’s Text Terminal, Black History is United States History.

Thurgood Marshall on the Right to Intellectual Freedom

“If the First Amendment means anything, it means that a State has no business telling a man, sitting alone in his own house, what books he may read or what films he may watch.”

Thurgood Marshall

Stanley v. Georgia (1969)

Excerpted from: Shapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Independent Practice: Aksum

Here is an independent practice worksheet on the Kingdom of Aksum, which was located in the north of present-day Ethiopia. If you teach social studies, and particularly global studies, or world history, of whatever your school or district calls the history of global civilizations, than you are no doubt aware of the importance of Aksum.

This is really something, I think, kids ought to know.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Shameful, If the Adults Involved Were Actually Capable of Experiencing Shame

Working in a school where things like this happen doesn’t exactly cause my heart to swell with pride. Casual brutality is part of the culture of this school: teachers know it, students know it, and parents know it. The administration of the school is apparently ignorant of it.

Needless to say, I am already planning my departure.

Toni Cade Bambara

“(Born Miltona Mirkin Cade, 1939-1995): American short-story writer, novelist, and editor. Known as a writer and social activist, Bambara focused on issues of racial awareness and feminism. Her first, most widely read collection of stories, Gorilla, My Love (1972), depicts a young, sensitive black girl and her family and community as she grows up in a world of racial, sexual, and economic inequality. Her second collection, The Sea Birds Are Still Alive (1977), portrays the intense conflicts among people, especially women, involved in intimate relationships. Interested in black liberation and women’s movements during the 1970s, Bambara edited and contributed to The Black Women: An Anthology (1970), one of the early collections of feminist writing. Her novel, The Salt Eaters (1980), set in Claybourne, Georgia, deals with the recovery of the revolutionary community organizer Velma Henry from an attempted suicide.”

Excerpted from: Murphy, Bruce, ed. Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia, Fourth Edition. New York: Harper Collins, 1996.

Cultural Literacy: Thurgood Marshall

OK: here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Thurgood Marshall to reminds students of this major–and great–figure in the United States in the twentieth century.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Muhammad Ali on His Career in Sports

“It’s just a job. Grass grows, birds fly, waves pound the sand, I beat people up.”

Muhammad Ali

Quoted in N.Y. Times, 6 April 1977

Excerpted from: Shapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.