Monthly Archives: May 2016

What Do We Teach?

“At present there are differences of opinion…for all peoples do not agree as to the things that the young ought to learn, either with a view to virtue or with a view to the best life, nor is it clear whether their studies should be regulated more with regard to intellect or to regard to character.”

Aristotle (384-322 B.C.)

Excerpted from: Howe, Randy, ed. The Quotable Teacher. Guilford, CT: The Lyons Press, 2003.

The Weekly Text, May 27, 2016: Two Learning Supports on Roman Numerals and Roman Deities

It’s finally Memorial Day Weekend: I don’t know about you, but I’m glad! That extra day makes all the difference in the world at this time of year. When we return on Tuesday, we’ll start counting down the days to the end of the school year.

This week’s Text offers two learning supports on Rome: the first is a learning support for Roman numerals; the second a chart of Roman deities.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Education and Social Equity

“Surely there is enough for everyone within this country. It is a tragedy that these good things are not more widely shared. All our children ought to be allowed a stake in the enormous richness of America.”

Jonathan Kozol, Savage Inequalities: Children in America’s Schools (1991)

Excerpted from: Howe, Randy, ed. The Quotable Teacher. Guilford, CT: The Lyons Press, 2003.

The Weekly Text, May 20, 2016: Three Context Clues Worksheets on Exegesis (n), Exegete (n), and Exegetical (adj)

As the school year wanes, I’m working on The Weekly Texts for the summer months. I plan a lengthy break from computer screens and keyboards. So, I’ll prepare a bunch of posts, then publish them from my smartphone. If you’re a user of this blog who links through from the AFT’s Share My Lesson Plan sitenota bene that I won’t be able to post material there for much of the summer. You may want to point your browser directly to Mark’s Text Terminal; I’ll post a new Text every Friday throughout the summer.

For this week, here are three context clues worksheets on the words exegesis, exegete and exegetical. If you teach English, and particularly novels, poems etc., these are three words your students, arguably, ought to know. In any case, this trio also shows students something about word roots and morphology, and that can be taught actively, or left for students to infer.

Until next week….

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Virtue of Liberalism

“The noblest aspect of the American liberal tradition is its respect for diversity.”

Theodore R. Sizer (1932-2009)

Excerpted from: Howe, Randy, ed. The Quotable Teacher. Guilford, CT: The Lyons Press, 2003.

Some Confucian Wisdom

“Learning without thought is time lost.”

Confucius

Excerpted from: Howe, Randy, ed. The Quotable Teacher. Guilford, CT: The Lyons Press, 2003.

What Teachers Really Do

“The teacher’s task is not to implant facts but to place the subject to be learned in from of the learner and, through sympathy, emotion, imagination, and patience, to awaken in the learner the restless drive for answers and insights which enlarge the personal life and give it meaning.”

Nathan M. Pusey (1907-2001) as Quoted in The New York Times (1959)

Excerpted from: Howe, Randy, ed. The Quotable Teacher. Guilford, CT: The Lyons Press, 2003.

On Role Modeling

“Setting an example is not the main means of influencing another, it is the only means.”

Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

Excerpted from: Howe, Randy, ed. The Quotable Teacher. Guilford, CT: The Lyons Press, 2003.

The Weekly Text, May 13, 2016: A Learning Support and Worksheet on Citing Sources in Research Papers

It’s Friday the 13th! I hope nothing bad happens to you today.

Although I teach struggling students, I hold them to high standards. One way I can do that–and that is the purpose of this website, incidentally–is to adapt the curriculum in a way that has them doing the same work, though not at the same pace or in the same manner, as their peers working in the general education curriculum. I’m particularly interested in helping students learn to write synthetic research papers, as I’ve mentioned elsewhere in these pages. Needless to say, students struggling with literacy, executive skills, issues with focus and attention, impulse control, or general apathy need support, and plenty of it, to navigate a project of the scope of most research papers.

Here is a a worksheet that assists students in determining when to cite sources in a synthetic research paper; this is the same text as the worksheet, but rearranged and annotated as a learning support.

As always, I hope you find this material useful, and I’d be grateful to hear how you’ve used it and/or adapted it. Until next week….

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Lest We Forget

“He who opens a school door, closes a prison.”

Victor Hugo (1802-1885)

Excerpted from: Howe, Randy, ed. The Quotable Teacher. Guilford, CT: The Lyons Press, 2003.