Tag Archives: high-interest materials

Stonewall

Before Pride Month 2019 slips away, I want to post this reading on the Stonewall Riot and the vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet that accompanies it.

Don’t forget: this Friday, June 28, 2019, is the fiftieth anniversary of Stonewall!

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: Check It

Let’s start this week, the last before I take a substantial break from blogging for a few weeks, with this complete lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Check It.”

I begin this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the American idiom “read the riot act” to get the class settled and engaged after a class change. Here from the Crime and Puzzlement book is a PDF scan of the illustration and questions that drive the analytical activity that is the gravamen of this lesson. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key that solves the case.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Baseball Cards

If there is a better time than a warm afternoon in late June to post this reading on baseball cards, I can’t imagine when that would be. Here is the vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet that accompanies it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Franz Kafka

Last fall, while unpacking some boxes of books for my classroom library, I learned with considerable pleasure that Peter Kuper has rendered Franz Kafka’s novella The Metamorphosis as a graphic novel. Personally, I like what Mr. Kuper has done with that staple of Mad Magazine, Antonio Prohias’s Cold War allegory as comic strip, “Spy vs. Spy.” Mr. Prohias was a hard act to follow, and Mr. Kuper has done so respectably, indeed even admirably. Professionally, that the students I teach–who have neither particular nor general interest in reading for pleasure–all read The Metamorphosis amazed me. Needless to say, I recommend this book for your classroom.

To complement The Metamorphosis, should you come by a copy, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Franz Kafka.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: Tragedy in the Bathroom

Ok, it’s Wednesday morning on the final week of the 2018-2019 school year. Everytime I write something like that, I feel like a convict marking time.

Here, on this cool late spring morning, is a complete lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Tragedy in the Bathroom.” I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the American idiom “Play Possum.” For the lesson itself, you’ll need this PDF scan of the illustration and questions from Crime and Puzzlement Volume 1. Finally, here is the answer key to Tragedy in the Bathroom, which I’ve rendered in typescript in the event that you need to adjust it for English language learners or struggling readers.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

War of the Worlds

The story of Orson Welles’ broadcast of H.G. Wells’ War of the Worlds fascinated me as a grade-schooler. I think I was first exposed to it in around fifth grade. But even at that tender age, I was surprised that people were taken in by it–but also sympathetic that they were. I remember trying to imagine myself in the place of the folks who thought Welles was delivering news, rather than a science-fiction story. I could, but only barely.

Any way, here is a reading on Orson Welles’ broadcast of War of the Worlds along with its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Ty Cobb

He was a nasty and irredeemably racist piece of work, but he was also one of the greatest baseball players in the history of the game.

For that reason, Mark’s Text Terminal offers, with some trepidation, this reading on Ty Cobb and its accompanying worksheet for vocabulary building and comprehension.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.