Tag Archives: high-interest materials

Paparazzi

Here, at the end of another excruciating day, is a reading on paparazzi and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. This material is of high interest for some students in my experience using it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Joe Namath

Ok, before I leave for a faculty meeting, here is a reading on Joe Namath and the vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet that attends it. Once students understand who Namath is and was, these documents tend to self-transmute into high-interest materials.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Bonnie and Clyde

As I get ready to leave school for the day, I’ll post this reading on Bonnie and Clyde and its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheetNota bene, please, that this is not biographical material on Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, but rather a reading on Arthur Penn’s film starring Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty, respectively, in the title roles.

Have you seen it? It’s a masterpiece by any standard I recognize.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Titanic

This reading on the Titanic and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet have tended to be relatively high interest material in my classrooms over the years.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy; Cryptography

OK, moving right along on this chilly Monday morning, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on cryptography. This has turned out, at times, to be of very high interest to students I’ve taught over the years.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Birthmarks

Health teacher, here is a reading on birthmarks and its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. These documents have been of surprisingly high interest to most of the kids I’ve had the privilege to teach over all these years.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, September 13, 2019

As I’ve mentioned elsewhere on this blog, the lessons I prepared to attend the Crime and Puzzlement books are quite frequently downloaded. Because I am exhausted from trying to get the school year started, and therefore bereft of imagination and initiative, I offer, as this week’s Text, a complete lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Dropout.”

I use this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the expression “Sword of Damocles” to open the lesson after a class change. You’ll need this PDF of the illustration and questions that drive this lesson to teach it. Finally, here is the answer key typescript; it’s in word if you need to differentiate it for your students.

And that makes ten posts for this week, so I’m done here for the moment. I hope your school year is off to a good start.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.