Tag Archives: high-interest materials

ARPAnet

This reading on ARPAnet, which it will tell you, was the precursor to the Internet, has invariably been a high interest item for the students with whom I’ve worked over the years. Here is its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: The Man in 1458

Ok, folks, her is another complete lesson plan on a Crime and Puzzlement case, this one “The Man in 1458.” I start this lesson, after the rigamarole of a class change, with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on Braille, the written language for sight impaired people. You’ll need this PDF of the illustration and questions for your students so they can analyze the evidence of this case of fraud. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key with the solution to the case.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Hulk Hogan

I’d assumed his star was no longer part of the professional wrestling firmament, but it has generally turned out that this reading on wrestler Hulk Hogan is of high interest to quite a few kids. You’ll probably want this vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet that accompanies it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: Boy Scout

Moving right along, here is a complete lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Boy Scout.” I open this lesson, after the relative chaos of a class change, with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the American English idiom bone to pick. This PDF of the illustration and questions of the case is the centerpiece of the lesson. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key to finish the lesson by solving the case.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Red Auerbach

Ok, teachers in Boston and environs, if not the entire state of Massachussetts, I’m hard-pressed to imagine that this reading on legendary Celtics coach Red Auerbach and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet wouldn’t be of high interest in you educational marketplace, so to speak. I conducted a brisk trade in these documents when I taught in Springfield, Massachusetts, last year.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Bill Gates

Here, if anyone needs it, is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Bill Gates. Over the years, this has tended to be a relatively high-interest item, so I’ve tagged it as such.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: Kidnap

OK, moving right along on this Friday morning, here is a complete lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Kidnap.” I open this lesson, after the fractiousness of a class change, with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the idiom “bee in one’s bonnet.” You’ll need this PDF of the reading and questions that drive the case. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key that solves the case.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.