Tag Archives: context clues

Complicity (n)

OK, if you’ve been listening, even passively, as I have mostly, to the House January 6 Hearings, you’ll understand why now is a good time to post this context clues worksheet on the noun complicity. For the purposes of inferring meaning from context in this document, complicity means “association or participation in or as if in a wrongful act.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cogent (adj)

Here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective cogent. It’s not a word one hears much, which is too bad as it is a solid, useful word which means “appealing forcibly to the mind or reason,” “convincing,” “pertinent,” and  “relevant.” Merriam-Webster also makes a point of emphasizing the synonym “valid” for cogent.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Buffoon (n)

It’s not much used any more (though maybe it should be), but here, nonetheless, is a context clues worksheet on the noun buffoon. Did you know it means “a ludicrous figure,” “clown,” and “a gross and usually ill-educated or stupid person”? If so, you probably understand why I might urge a return of its use to, you know, comment appropriately on our time.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Argue (vi/vt)

Here is a context clues worksheet on the verb argue. For the purposes of this document, argue is used transitively to mean, variously, “to give evidence of,” “to consider the pros and cons of,” “to prove or try to prove by giving reasons,” and “to persuade by giving reasons.”

This document doesn’t deal fully with this word, or its implications for student’s academic work. If you need or want more material on argumentation, you can enter the word in the search box on your right, or simply click on argumentation in the word cloud just below the search box.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Chasten (vt)

This context clues worksheet on the transitive verb chasten was Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day at some point. This isn’t a particularly high-frequency word in English–nor is its noun, chaste–which is too bad, as these are useful words. For the purposes of this document, chasten means “to correct by punishment or suffering.” Remember that this verb is used only transitively, so don’t forget your direct object: the subject of your sentence must chasten something or someone.

(Incidentally, if you’re interested, chasten also means “discipline,” “purify,” “to prune (as a work or style of art) of excess, pretense, or falsity,” “refine,” “to cause to be more humble or restrained,” and “subdue.”)

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Circumvent (vt)

Last but not least this morning, here is a context clues worksheet on the verb circumvent. It means “to hem in,” “to make a circuit around,” and “to manage to get around especially by ingenuity or stratagem.” This verb is used only transitively, so don’t forget your direct object: what are you circumventing?

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Certify (vt), Certificate (n)

Here’s a pair of context clues worksheets that should go out together: the first on the verb certify and the second on the noun certificate.

Certify is used only transitively. It carries a variety of meanings, but for the context in which this worksheet embeds the verb, , it means “to attest authoritatively,” “confirm,” and “to attest as being true or as represented or as meeting a standard.” A certificate is what one receives when the definition of certify has been met in practice.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Caustic (adj)

Here is a context clues worksheet on caustic used as an adjective. For that part of speech caustic means “capable of destroying or eating away by chemical action” and “corrosive.” Nota bene, please, that this word is also used as a noun, whose meaning is “a caustic agent,” and “a substance that burns or destroys organic tissue by chemical action. This worksheet is set up for building an understanding of caustic as an adjective.

However, because this document is formatted in Microsoft Word, if you want to revise this to teach the noun, the document is yours (as are almost everything you’ll find on Mark’s Text Terminal) to manipulate as your wish or as your student need.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cant (n)

If you can use it, here is a context clues worksheet on the noun cant. It means, within the context the sentences in this document supply, “affected singsong or whining speech” and especially “the expression or repetition of conventional or trite opinions or sentiments; especially : the insincere use of pious words.” I don’t know whether students need to know this word or not; I am fairly confident, however, that whenever a mass shooting occurs in this country, and politicians take to Twitter to intone about their thoughts and prayers, that we hear cant in its purest form.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Catastrophe (n)

Here is a context clues worksheet on the noun catastrophe. The sentences in this document are keyed to the definition of this noun as “a momentous tragic event ranging from extreme misfortune to utter overthrow or ruin,” “a violent and sudden change in a feature of the earth,” and “a violent usually destructive natural event (as a supernova).” Given the rapid pace of the long-forecast effects of global warming, this word will serve students well in understanding and describing the world in which they live.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.