Tag Archives: context clues

Nuance (n)

If you listen to the general day-to-day discourse in our society, particularly political discourse, you have probably noticed that while it is often forthrightly counterfactual and mendacious, it is also coarse and myopic. For that reason, I offer this context clues worksheet on the noun nuance. Everybody should know this abstract noun and the concept it represents–you know, subtlety, shades of meaning, thoughtfulness, and the gradations of the analysis that follow these approaches to understanding something deeply.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Numerology (n)

While I recall that I felt an urgent need for it when I wrote it, I can’t now remember why I needed this context clues worksheet on the noun numerology. Generally, when I feel urgency to write something, it means a student expressed interest in a subject. I imagine that was the case when this document arrived in my files. Anyway, numerology is basically a form of mysticism, and you will find numerous examples of numerology (as above) drawn from Barnaby Rogerson’s Rogerson’s Book of Numbers: The Culture of Numbers–from 1,001 Nights to the Seven Wonders of the World. New York: Picador, 2013.

 If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Novel (n/adj)

It’s now fall in Vermont, and simply beautiful. Here, first thing on a Monday morning, is a pair of context clues worksheets on novel as both a noun and an adjective. These offer a nice, I hope cogent, to teach a point of usage while introducing students to a word in very common usage in educated and even casual discourse in English.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Negligent (adj)

Alright, as the coronavirus continues to blaze a second trail across the United Stages, now seems like a perfect time to publish this context clues worksheet on the adjective negligent. However, I wonder if in teaching the concept of negligence, it might be better to start with the verb, neglect. The framework of this document should, I think, make it easy to produce your own context clues worksheets on those words.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Futile (adj)

It’s a great word for students to know in this day and age, so I hasten to publish this context clues worksheet on the adjective futile. It’s Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day today; it’s also a word in very common use in the English language, so students really ought to know it by the time they move the tassel on their mortarboards.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Kiln (n)

If you are of a certain age, you wouldn’t need this context clues worksheet on the noun kiln because you would have had an art class, where you would have had a chance to shape clay and fire it into a ceramic object–using a kiln. Now, however, since we as a society appear to have resolved that children don’t need arts instruction, kids have fewer and fewer interactions with industrial objects like kilns. So we can’t count on their knowing what a kiln is or what it does.

In any case, it was the Word of the Day today at Merriam-Webster; as you can see, I couldn’t let it pass without comment or context clues worksheet.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Misnomer (n)

I don’t know if I can argue that it’s a word high-schoolers ought to know, but if you think so, then here is a context clues worksheet on the noun misnomer. It means “a use of a wrong or inappropriate name” and “a wrong name or inappropriate designation.”

Misnomer does appear fairly often in educated discourse.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Usurp (vi/vt)

It is, to sound a familiar theme, the Word of the Day at Merriam-Webster seems like another timely verb to me, so here is a context clues worksheet on the verb usurp, which is used both intransitively and transitively.

N.B. please that the context clues sentences for this word are a bit dense. I struggled to find a way to write simple sentences, then opted for building in some social studies content–e.g. you can see how usurp, which means, basically, “to seize and hold without right”–could easily end up in a short declarative sentence about the Magna Carta.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Shill (vi)

It popped up at Merriam-Webster yesterday, and I can’t think of a better time, in a world where nothing is sacred and everything is for sale, to compose and publish this context clues worksheet on the verb shill. It’s only used intransitively. Shill is also a noun: someone who shills is, naturally, a shill.

Enough said.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Reciprocate (vi/vt)

Here, on a beautiful fall morning, is a a context clues worksheet on the verb reciprocate; it’s used both intransitively and transitively. Leaving aside its use as a noun in the reciprocals of fractions, which was something I saw students struggle with in the few instances I taught math. Maybe knowing this verb, and using it in context, might help with understanding reciprocals in fractions.

If not, at least kids will know a very commonly used verb in English.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.