Tag Archives: foreign languages

Word Root Exercise: Purg

Moving right along on this rainy morning in Vermont, here is a worksheet on the Latin word root purg. It means clean, and is a very productive root in English and the Romance languages. However, as you will see, you and your students, where words that grow around this root are concerned, will need to think broadly and figuratively about the definition of clean.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, June 26, 2020

This week’s Text is a lesson plan on the Latin word roots magn, magna, and magni. They mean great and large and are very productive in English. I open this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the adjective voluminous. Voluminous, as you most likely understand, means (among other things) “having or marked by great volume or bulk.” I chose this word for this lesson to offer both a hint about what the three roots here under study mean, but also to supply a near synonym. Finally, here is the scaffolded worksheet at the center of this lesson’s work.

Happy Friday! Wash your hands, wear a mask, stay safe.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Pept, Peps

Last but not least this morning, here is a worksheet on the Greek word roots pept and pepsThey mean digestion.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Term of Art: Harappan Script

“Harappan Script: That of the Harappan civilization, flourishing in the Indus valley in the 3rd-2nd millennia BC. Undeciphered and not demonstrably connected to later Indian scripts.”

Excerpted from: Matthews, P.H., ed. The Oxford Concise Dictionary of Linguistics. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

Partitive

[Aside: When I was studying Russian in college, for some reason, I really struggled with the partitive genitive–not in English, but in Russian. If you have children or students studying inflected languages, this squib might be of some assistance to them.]

Partitive: Indicating restricting, setting off, or only a part of, e.g. ‘a scrap of food,’ ‘one of your friends.’”

Excerpted from: Grambs, David. The Random House Dictionary for Writers and Readers. New York: Random House, 1990.

Word Root Exercise: Quart

OK, it’s Friday! Even though I’ve been unemployed since March 12, over forty years in the work force seems to have set my body to recognize days of the week. And Friday, well…I needn’t belabor the point other than to say tomorrow is Saturday.

Here is a worksheet on the Latin word root quart. It means, you won’t be surprised to hear, fourth. It will also not surprise you to hear that this is a very productive root in English. Math teachers, this might be of some use to you, especially if you are working with English language learners.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Urdu

“Urdu: An Indo-Aryan language of the Indian subcontinent, associated with the Moghul Empire, in which Persian was the court language. It is used especially Muslims and written in a variant of the Perso-Arabic script. Closely related to Hindi, Urdu has a similar pronunciation and grammar but a more heavily Persianized and Arabicized vocabulary. It is the national language of Pakistan and is its co-official language with English. In India, it is the state language of the state of Jammu and Kashmir, and associate state language of the state of Uttar Pradesh. It is spoken as a first language by c.30m and as a second language by c.100m people in India and Pakistan, and some thousands of people of Indo-Pakistani origin in Fiji, Guyana, South Africa, the UK, and the US.”

Excerpted from: McArthur, Tom. The Oxford Concise Companion to the English Language. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.

A Lesson Plan on the Latin Word Root Lingu-

Here is a lesson plan on the Latin word root lingu-, which means language and tongue. You no doubt recognize it as the basis of the word linguist, which is a noun I like to throw around freely in my classroom.

I open this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the noun tongue in its sense as a synonym for the word language, as in “Fatima’s native tongue is Urdu.” Finally, here is the worksheet that is the center of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Per

Alright, it is Monday once more. I don’t know about you, but time passes at an accelerating rate at Mark’s Text Terminal as this pandemic continues. I’ve read in various places over the years that time passes more quickly when one is busy. I have stayed busy, but not nearly as busy as if I were working full time. In any case, when I talk to friends, they relate the same experience with time this spring.

Let’s get started. Here is a worksheet on the Latin word root per. It means through, thoroughly, and wrong.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Rub

Here is a worksheet on the Latin word rub. It means red, as you will quickly infer from its basis in the English word ruby.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.