Tag Archives: foreign languages

Hausa

Hausa: Chadic language, native to northern Nigeria (roughly from Kaduna northwards and some 200 km east of Kano westwards) and neighboring parts of Niger. Also widespread as a second language, there and elsewhere, and as a lingua franca across West Africa. Written in Arabic script before the 20th century, now largely in Roman.

Excerpted from: Marshall, P.H., ed. The Oxford Concise Dictionary of Linguistics. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

Word Root Exercise: Aqua

OK, one last thing this morning, because I want to try to link this worksheet on the Latin word root aqua to a Pinterest board I’ve created. It means, of course, water.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Cracy and Crat

Alright: I just now completed a months-long project on developing new readings, so I can begin to spend a bit more time at Mark’s Text Terminal.

Here is a worksheet on the Greek roots cracy and crat. Unsurprisingly, they mean government, rule, and power.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Log/o

On a rainy morning, here is a worksheet on the Greek word root log/o. It means word, discourse, and doctrine.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Vox Populi (noun phrase)

While I doubt you have much call for it, here, nonetheless, is a context clues worksheet on the Latinism vox populi. It’s a noun phrase meaning, just as it sounds, “voice of the people.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.