Tag Archives: foreign languages

Word Root Exercise: Gyn/o, Gyne, and Gynec/o

OK, let’s begin the week with this worksheet on the Greek roots gyn/o, gyne, and gynec/o. If you know the words gynecologist (or perhaps an even more timely word, misogynist), then you know that these roots mean “woman” and “female.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: E Pluribus Unum

Finally on this Monday morning, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Latin phrase e pluribus unum, the motto of the United States, appearing on the nation’s great seal. Unfortunately, this elegant phrase was never codified as the nation’s motto, so in 1956, in a counter-enlightenment move, “In God We Trust” was passed into law at the official motto of the United States.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Mega, Megal/o, Megaly

Here is a worksheet on the Greek word roots mega, megal/o, and megaly. They mean large, great, and million.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Ergo

“(UR GO or AIR GO) Ergo is the Latin term for “therefore,” “hence,” “consequently,” “it follows that….” It is often used to give an air of formality to a presentation of the conclusion to an argument. Like the less frequently used Q.E.D., it implies that the person presenting the argument is “learned” or specifically trained in logic.”

Excerpted from: Trail, George Y. Rhetorical Terms and Concepts: A Contemporary Glossary. New York: Harcourt Brace, 2000.

Word Root Exercise: Nom, Nomin, Nomen, Onomas and Onomat

Here is a worksheet on the Latin roots nom, nomin, nomen, onomas, and onomat. These are very productive roots in English; they mean name and noun.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Meter, Metr, and Metry

Here is a vocabulary-building worksheet on the Greek roots meter,metr, and -metry.  They mean measure, to measure, and science of measuring.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Hausa

Hausa: Chadic language, native to northern Nigeria (roughly from Kaduna northwards and some 200 km east of Kano westwards) and neighboring parts of Niger. Also widespread as a second language, there and elsewhere, and as a lingua franca across West Africa. Written in Arabic script before the 20th century, now largely in Roman.

Excerpted from: Marshall, P.H., ed. The Oxford Concise Dictionary of Linguistics. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.