Tag Archives: foreign languages

Word Root Exercise: Phyll/o

OK, closing out the afternoon and the first semester of this school year, here is a worksheet on the Greek root phyll/o. It means leaf, and is very productive, particularly in the sciences, in the English language.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Physi/o

Alrighty, then: here is a worksheet on the Greek root physi/o, which means both nature and physical. This root is, needless to say, very productive in English, especially in the sciences.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Etruscan

“Etruscan: Ancient language in an area of Italy to the north of Rome, attested by inscriptions from around 700 BC, until extinguished by Latin. Not genetically related to any language any better documented; hence only partly and insecurely understood. Written in an alphabet derived from that of Greek and itself one source of the Roman.”

Excerpted from: Matthews, P.H., ed. The Oxford Concise Dictionary of Linguistics. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

Word Root Exercise: Quin, Quint, Quintu, Quinque

Here is a worksheet on the Latin roots quin, quint, quintu, and quinque. You probably already recognize the meaning of these roots as five and fifth. This root is very productive in English and probably quintessential to student vocabulary building.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on the Greek Word Root Auto

If you scroll down to the seventh post below this one, you will find a pair of context clues worksheets on the noun autobiography and the adjective autobiographical.

I thought perhaps this lesson plan on the Greek word root auto–it means self and same–might be complement those worksheets, or vice versa. I open this lesson, hinting at the meaning of the root, with this context clues worksheet on the adjective identical. Finally, here is the word root worksheet that is the mainstay of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Zeitgeist

If there was ever a time for kids to learn this German noun, one of those abstractions that the Germans are good at contriving in compounds, it is now. To that end, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the word and concept zeitgeist.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Ad Hominem

“Ad Hominem To the man: appealing to the sentiments or prejudices of the hearer of listener rather than to his or her reason or intelligence; disparaging a person’s character rather than his or her sentiments; personal rather than substantive or ideological.

‘The boss knows all about the so-called fallacy of the argumentum ad hominem. ‘It may be a fallacy,’ he said, ‘ but it is shore-God useful. If you use the right kind of argumentum, you can always scare the hominem into a laundry bill he didn’t expect.’ Robert Penn Warren, All the King’s Men.”

Excerpted from: Grambs, David. The Random House Dictionary for Writers and Readers. New York: Random House, 1990.