Tag Archives: foreign languages

Word Root Exercise: Inter-

Here is a worksheet on the Latin word root inter. It means between and among. As you have no doubt already recognized, this is an extremely productive root in English, growing such high-frequency words as interfere, intercept, and interim (all present in this document), among many others. Inter should not be confused with intra and intro, which mean within, inward, inside, and into (a worksheet on which is forthcoming).

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, 2 December 2021: A Lesson Plan on the Crime and Puzzlement Case “Westward Ho-Hum!”

This week’s Text is a lesson plan on the the Crime and Puzzlement case “Westward Ho-Hum!” I open this lesson with this half-page Cultural Literacy worksheet (with a two-sentence reading and three comprehension questions) on the Gallicism esprit de corps. To fortify this document with a bit of context, Merriam-Webster defines this noun as denoting “the common spirit existing in the members of a group and inspiring enthusiasm, devotion, and strong regard for the honor of the group.”

To investigate this case, your students will need this PDF of the illustration and questions that serve as both evidence and procedure of inquiry into this heinous crime. Finally, to solve your case and apprehend a suspect, here is the typescript of the answer key.

And that’s it for this week. I hope you and yours enjoyed a relaxed and (if this is your bent), suitably gluttonous Thanksgiving.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Gon/o,

Here is a worksheet on the Greek roots gon/o and -gony. They mean reproduction, origination, and generation. Unsurprisingly, then, you’ll find gon/o at the base of gonad. Otherwise, besides cosmogony, (and, alas, gonorrhea ) the words on this worksheet are all new to me. If the book from which they are drawn is believable, these are words that will turn up on the SAT.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Ig, Il, In, Im, Ir

Here is a worksheet on the Latin roots ig, il, in, im, ir; they mean not and without. These are though of in English language arts classes as prefixes, which they are for the purposes of this worksheet. You’ll find these root at the beginning of many high-frequency words in English adjectives in English such as ignorant and illegal. And while words like illegible, immutable, incongruous, and irrefutable (all present in this document) are less frequently used in common discourse, they are quite useful in academic prose.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Dia-

Here is a worksheet on the Greek word root dia-. It means through, apart, and cross. This is a productive root in English, yielding such high-frequency words as diameter, diagonal, dialogue, and diaspora; these are words that, respectively, will turn up in mathematics, English, and social studies classes, as well as many other places in students’ primary and secondary educational lives.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Gress, Grad, Gradi, and Grade

Here is a worksheet on the Latin word roots gress, grad, gradi, and grade. They mean to step and to go. Unsurprisingly, they are at the base of such high-frequency words in English as egress, digress, graduate, and regress, and the many parts of speech in which these words end up –e.g. regressive, graduation, regressive and aggressive.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Di, Diplo

Here is a worksheet on the Greek word roots di and diplo. They mean two and double. You’ll find these roots underneath an everyday word like dilemma, but on this worksheet (which, if the book from which it is adapted is to be believed, contains words commonly found on the SAT), you’ll find it at the base of linguistic terms like digraph and diphthong, and scientific words like dichloride and dichromate.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Coup de Grace

It’s a relatively commonly used Gallicism in English, so here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the noun coup de grace. It means “a deathblow or death shot administered to end the suffering of one mortally wounded.” and “a decisive finishing blow, act, or event.” The latter definition obtains in the vernacular, where this noun finds use most frequently to mean “a final blow.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, 5 November 2021: A Lesson Plan on the Crime and Puzzlement Case “False Alarm”

This week’s Text is a lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement Case “False Alarm.” I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Gallicism enfant terrible.

To conduct your investigation of this misdemeanor, you’ll need this PDF of the illustration and questions that serve as evidence and interrogative in the case. And here is the typescript of the answer key. And that’s it for another week.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Cyt/o, -Cyte

Here is a worksheet on the Greek word roots cyt/o and -cyte. They mean, simply, cell. The most commonly used words to my eye on this worksheet (which also, if the book from which I adapted this is credible, tend to appear on the SAT and other high-stakes, college gatekeeping tests), are cytoplasm and lymphocyte. If you have students looking down the road at a career in the healthcare professions, this might be a useful document. If not, not (as Gertrude Stein once said).

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.