Tag Archives: health

Sperm

After typing that header, I have to ask myself what I’m thinking. Well, health teachers and health sciences teachers, I’m thinking maybe you can use this reading on sperm and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. That is all.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Respirator Therapy

Here is a reading on respirator therapy along with its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. When I pulled out this reading yesterday to process it into the finished documents you see here, I thought it would be a timely item to post. The reading is primarily about the device, long obsolete, if the number of them I’ve seen in junk shops over the years, is any indication known as the iron lung.

So, this doesn’t tell the story of the kinds of ventilators used for keeping COVID19 patients alive, but rather some of its predecessors. That said, there is some information about CPAP machines, a device relatively well-known these days.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Neurosis

None of us know, I guess, what’s going to happen with schools opening in the fall. Even with the best case scenario, opening schools is a dicey proposition. In any case, health teachers or just about anyone in a classroom come September, you may find this reading on neurosis and its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet useful for helping your students understand their feelings.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Edward Jenner and Smallpox

Last but not least this morning, especially considering that Edward Jenner was instrumental in refining the art and science of vaccinations, which makes him a man of his and our time, here is a reading on Edward Jenner and Smallpox along with its vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Prematurity

I worked up this reading on prematurity (in the sense of premature births) and its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet for a student, and I think after that one use, it disappeared until today, when I found it in a far corner of my desktop. Health educators, is this something you teach about?

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Alcoholism

Here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on alcoholism that doesn’t require any explanation, I guess.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Morphine

When I left Vermont in August of 1996 to seek my fortune as a doctoral candidate in history, I intended to return posthaste–if not to Vermont, than as near to the state as possible. Last August (of 2019) I finally made it back here to work in a public school system. I’d visited every summer for many years, but as I learned slowly and the hard way (like the way I learn everything in my life, alas), living in a place is quite a bit different than visiting it.

Of course I was aware of the opioid crisis in the state–it has been national news–and a national problem, after all–but I hadn’t had a chance to see it up close.

Now I have, and I can tell you that in the 23 years I was away, opioids cut a wide swath through the social and economic fabric of this fine state. So, for any young person who thinks that trying opioids won’t necessarily lead to personal disaster, here is a reading on morphine along with its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Influenza Epidemic of 1918

While wandering around in the warehouse yesterday morning, I came across this reading on the influenza epidemic of 1918 and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. Given that this historical event has become something of a touchstone for understanding our current circumstances, i.e. the coronavirus pandemic, I can’t quite understand how I lost track of this material.

That is, until I read it. Over the years, I’ve developed a great deal of material based on the mostly excellent readings in the Intellectual Devotional series; I’ve also had a lot of success in using these materials. Students who would turn up their nose at a book, or a reading from a textbook (I especially understand the latter, as most corporate-published textbooks are lethal), will take on one of these–especially high-interest readings. This reading, however, is one of the weakest I’ve seen.

Which, however, provides some grist for the critical mill. Let’s start with the title of this reading. The influenza of 1918 was by any measure a pandemic–that’s why one of the John M. Barry’s book, The Great Influenza, one of the best on the subject, carries the subtitle “The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History.” So, the title for the reading in this post offers students an opportunity to differentiate, and understand the difference between, an epidemic and a pandemic. The influenza of 1918 was certainly a pandemic–remember that the Greek root pan means all. This reading, in short, presents an opportunity to teach students the importance of using language with precision.

In other words, the big question this reading raises is: Was the influenza outbreak of 1918 an epidemic or a pandemic?

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Uterus

OK, health teachers, here is a reading on the human uterus along with its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet.

I guess there’s not much to say other than that.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Tonsillitis

When I was a kid, a couple of hundred years ago, it was a common childhood malady. I don’t know if remains so, but in any case, here is a reading on tonsillitis along with its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet if you can use them.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.