La Victoria de Junin: Canto a Bolivar

“(1825) An ode by Jose Joaquin Olmedo (1780-1847), Ecuadorian poet and statesman. Dedicated to Simon Bolivar, the poem was inspired by the patriots’ victories at Junin and Ayacucho, which virtually terminated the South American struggle for independence. In form and structure, the work reveals Olmedo’s familiarity with the classics, and the opening lines closely imitate one of the odes of Horace. However, Olmedo’s exuberance, imagination, and extravagant metaphors, which Bolivar himself satirized, make the poem one of the forerunners of the romantic movement in Latin America.”

Excerpted from: Murphy, Bruce, ed. Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia, Fourth Edition. New York: Harper Collins, 1996.

Cultural Literacy: The Spanish Armada

While I do understand that this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Spanish Armada stretches, both in letter and spirit, the bounds of Hispanic Heritage Month, I confess its inclusion here reflects a well that I will still run dry. In any case, it is certainly a document that could find a place in a global studies class–here in New York it would be a freshman class.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

“In a village of La Mancha…

the name of which I won’t try to recall, there lived, not long ago, one of those gentlemen, who usually keep a lance upon a rack, an old shield, a lean horse, and a greyhound for coursing.”

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

Don Quixote pt I ch. I (1605)

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

The Weekly Text, September 21, 2018

As I sit down to post this Text, I realize that I’ve run through, in the past week, just about all the short materials I have to offer for Hispanic Heritage Month 2018 (if you encounter problems with that link, please advise; it might be the longest URL I’ve ever copied and pasted into WordPress’s link generating module).

This week’s Text is a reading on the Spanish-American War and this comprehension worksheet to accompany it. Both, as with almost all of the documents you find here, are in Microsoft Word and can be adapted for a variety of reading levels and attention spans.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Eduardo Barrios

“(1884-1963) Chilean novelist and short-story writer. After wandering throughout Latin America and working at a variety of jobs, Barrios settled in Santiago, where he served in the 1920s as minister of education and director of the national library. His mastery of the psychological tale is especially evident in his portrayal of hypersensitive personalities. Such is the ten-year-old protagonist of the novelette El nino que enloquecio de amor (1915), who falls in love with one of his mother’s friends. The hero of Un perdido (1917) is an overwrought weakling who, unable to cope with reality, finds refuge in alcohol. Barrios’s best work is probably El hermano asno (1922; tr Brother Ass, 1942), which deals with the inner conflicts of Brother Lazaro and Brother Rufino, two Franciscan monks. Gran senor y rajadiablos (1948) follows Jose Pedro Valverde, one of literature’s most strongly drawn characters, through a life centered mostly on a large fundo (ranch). Barrios’s last novel, Los hombres del hombre (1950), is a lyrical story of sexual jealousy and insecurity in family life.”

Excerpted from: Murphy, Bruce, ed. Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia, Fourth Edition. New York: Harper Collins, 1996.

Cultural Literacy: Developing Nations

I think if you combine this Cultural Literacy worksheet on developing nations or use it to preface an opening lesson on colonialism, students would make a connection and move toward an understanding of history as a process. I’ve had a few classes make the connection, but it requires some careful Socratic questioning.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Che Guevara on Revolution and Progress

“Revolution that does not constantly become more profound is a regressive revolution.”

“Guerilla Warfare–A Method,” Cuba Socialista (1961)

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.