114 Sura of the Koran

“There are 114 sura or ‘chapters’ within the Koran. These are named and numbered, but the names (such as The Cow or The Light) have no importance other than as a memory tag linked to some unusual feature. The chapters are not ordered by age of delivery or location (either Mecca or Medina), but in reverse length, so the shortest chapters begin the Koran and the longest end it. There is no narrative flow; indeed, at times one could almost imagine the Prophet’s revelations to be addressed to 114 different types of human, for each chapter is a development or a condensation of the same essential theme: how to live and love both mankind and God.”

Excerpted from: Rogerson, Barnaby. Rogerson’s Book of Numbers: The Culture of Numbers–from 1,001 Nights to the Seven Wonders of the World. New York: Picador, 2013.

Exculpate (vt)

Since it was Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day yesterday, here is a context clues worksheet on the verb exculpate today. It’s used only transitively.

This probably isn’t a word that would see a lot of use in a high school classroom. On the other hand, if you have students looking down the road at careers in the law or law enforcement, who knows? May it is appropriate.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Rotten Rejections: Isabel of Bavaria

[The squib refers to the novel by Alexandre Dumas.]

“Stick to drama, my dear fellow. You know you are a dramatic through and through.”

Excerpted from: Bernard, Andre, and Bill Henderson, eds. Pushcart’s Complete Rotten Reviews and Rejections. Wainscott, NY: Pushcart Press, 1998.

Word Root Exercise: Hetero (Greek)

Here’s a worksheet on the Greek word root hetero. It means, of course, different and other.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Abstract Expressionism (n)

“An umbrella term which refers to that direction in abstract art characterized by spontaneous and individual abstract expression in a non-objective manner. While the term was first applied to certain of Vassily Kandinsky’s early experimental paintings, it mostly refers to artists working in the 1940s and 1950s, including Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock. Sharing a similar outlook rather than a style, these artists sought total freedom for psychic expression on the canvas. Believed by some to be the first truly American art, the movement is also called the New York School because its international center was New York City. The influence of abstract expressionism extended into the 1970s with Lyrical Abstraction.”

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.

A Learning Support on Historical Ages and Eras

While I’ve used it for text for classroom posters, I’m not sure how otherwise useful this learning support on historical ages and eras really is in the classroom.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Abstract Art (n)

“Art in which elements of form have been stressed in handling the subject matter–which may or may not be recognizable. Abstraction is a relative term; all artworks exist on a continuum between total abstraction and full representation. Vassily Kandinsky is generally credited with having created the first purely abstract artwork in 1910.

Excerpted from: Diamond, David G. The Bulfinch Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms. Boston: Little Brown, 1992.