Kierkegaard on Metacognition and Wisdom

“It is the duty of human understanding to understand that there are things which it cannot understand, and what those things are.”

Soren Kierkegaard

Journals

Excerpted from: Wiggins, Grant, and Jay McTighe. Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 1998.

Cultural Literacy: Curiosity Killed the Cat

Finally, on this cool but rosy Thursday morning, here is a Culture Literacy worksheet on the idiom curiosity killed the cat. The expression remains current in American English and therefore its discourse, and is probably something students ought to know.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Jerome Bruner on Literal and Metaphorical Inquiry

“As every historian of science in the last hundred years has pointed out, scientists use all sorts of aids and intuitions and stories and metaphors to help them in their quest of getting their speculative model to fit ‘nature’…. My physicist friends are fond of the remark that physics is 95 percent speculation and 5 percent observation. And they are very attached to the expression ‘physical intuition’ as something that ‘real’ physicists have: They are not just tied to observation and measurement but how to get around in the theory even without them.”

Jerome Bruner

The Culture of Education

Excerpted from: Wiggins, Grant, and Jay McTighe. Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 1998.

 

Independent Practice: Clovis

At one point, Clovis had a role to play in the freshman global studies courses I co-taught in New York City; then he disappeared. He represents a number of key elements of early European history, not the least of which is the spread of Christianity into “barbarian” kingdoms.

In any case, I doubt this independent practice worksheet on Clovis has great utility in New York any longer. But perhaps someone, somewhere, might have a student keen to know more about this transitional figure. I’ve had more surprising and unusual requests for reading material than this.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Gadamer on the Nature of Understanding

“All understanding is ultimately self-understanding…. A person who understands, understands himself…. Understanding begins when something addresses us. This requires…the fundamental suspension of our own prejudices.”

Hans-Georg Gadamer

Truth and Method

Excerpted from: Wiggins, Grant, and Jay McTighe. Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 1998.

 

Vestige (n)

Moving right along this morning (light now appears at about 5:30 am, which suits me just fine!), here is a context clues worksheet on the noun vestige. There are a number of uses for this across common branch domains; in any case, it is almost inarguably a word students should know, so that they can master the concept of vestiges.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Central Park East’s Habits of Mind

The Central Park East Habits of Mind

From whose viewpoint are we seeing or reading or hearing? From what angle or perspective?

  1. How do we know when we know? What’s the evidence, and how reliable is it?
  2. How are things, events, or people connected to each other? What is the cause and what is the effect? How do they fit together?
  3. What’s new and what’s old? Have we run across this idea before?
  4. So what? Why does it matter? What does it all mean?

Excerpted from: Wiggins, Grant, and Jay McTighe. Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 1998.