The Death of Artemio Cruz

“(La muerte de Artemio Cruz, 1962; tr 1964) A novel by Carlos Fuentes. Fuentes takes a deep plunge into the dying body and the sharply aware conscience of Artemio Cruz, a political boss of contemporary Mexico. As Cruz’s entire life passes before him, his personality unfolds into an adversary I/Thou relationship. A third voice sets the events recalled by the accusatory “Thou” and the defensive “I” into objective historical frames. The story of the agonizing Cruz amounts to a tale of survival by betrayal of friends, ideals, and country. When the accusatory voice forces Cruz into shame for his cynicism and immorality, his ego protests that at least he survives, while all the idealists are dead. The power of the story itself is heightened by the brilliant use of stream of consciousness technique, which provides a multileveled depiction of life in Mexico during and after the revolution of 1910.”

Excerpted from: Murphy, Bruce, ed. Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia, Fourth Edition. New York: Harper Collins, 1996.

Ross Greene’s Assessment of Lagging Skills and Unsolved Problems

Elsewhere on this blog I’ve mentioned the work of Ross Greene. I thought, somewhere along the line, I’d posted his Assessment of Lagging Skills and Unsolved Problems. If it’s somewhere on this site, I can’t find it. If you’re working with troubled kids, this is a handy compendium of the challenges developing kids face.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Santayana on the End of War

“Only the dead have seen the end of war.”

George Santayana

Soliloquies in England and Later Soliloquies “Tipperary” (1922). Frequently attributed to Plato, as on the wall of the Imperial War Museum in London, in General Douglas MacArthur’s farewell address in West Point in 1962, and in the film Black Hawk Down, but it does not appear in Plato’s works.

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Cultural Literacy: Aristocracy

OK. here on a Sunday afternoon is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on aristocracy. By the strict definition of Hispanic Heritage Month, it’s another stretch. On the other hand, students need to understand the concept of aristocracy to understand land distribution across the Latin American world and its consequence, poverty.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Mario Raul de Morais Andrade

“(1893-1945) Brazilian poet and novelist. Andrade’s first book of poetry, Ha uma gota de sangue em cada poema (1917), was self-consciously lyrical and elegant. Then, with the sharp images and hard-edged diction of his second volume, Pauliceia desvairada (1922; tr Hallucinated City, 1968), he all but launched Brazilian modernism and was thereafter one of its most dedicated proponents. His novel Macunaima (1928) was a grandly successful exploration of what Andrade saw as the interwoven native and imported myths of the Brazilian people, which he wrote in an amalgam of arbitrarily combined Brazilian dialects. His O moviemento modernisto (1942), a milestone in modern criticism, is essential to an understanding of the literary history of Brazil. Andrade’s verse is collected in Poesias completas (1955).”

Excerpted from: Murphy, Bruce, ed. Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia, Fourth Edition. New York: Harper Collins, 1996.

Independent Practice: Sparta

Here’s an independent practice worksheet on Sparta.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Macedonio Fernandez on Origins

“Everything had been written, everything has been said; that’s what God heard before creating the world, when there was nothing yet. I have also heard that one, he may have answered from the old, split Nothingness. And then he began.

Macedonio Fernandez, Museo de la Novela de la Eterna (The Museum of Eternity’s Novel) prologue (1967)

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.