The New Yorker Defends AOC

[Here’s something from Diane Ravitch’s Blog that seems perfect for a repost during Women’s History Month 2019.]

Diane Ravitch's blog

This is a great article by New Yorker editor David Remnick about Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. It is almost funny how she has rattled the GOP. They hate, hate, hate her. Is it her youth, her idealism, her beauty, her brains? Is it because she has a heart and they don’t? Is it because she has a soul and they don’t? She frightens them. I worry for her safety.

David Remnick writes:

Sebastian Gorka, late of the Trump Administration, stood before the annual gathering of the Conservative Political Action Conference last week and made plain the inner frenzy of a party that must place…

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Margaret (Eleanor) Atwood

“(b. 1939) Canadian poet, novelist, and critic. Born in Ottawa, she attended the Univ. of Toronto and Harvard Univ. In the poetry collection The Circle Game (1964; Governor General’s Award), she celebrates the material world and condemns materialism. Her novels, several of which have become bestsellers, include Surfacing (1972), Lady Oracle (1976), Life Before Man (1979), Bodily Harm (1981), The Handmaid’s Tale (1985) Governor General’s Award), Cat’s Eye (1988), The Robber Bride (1993), and Alias Grace (1996). She is noted for her Canadian nationalism and her feminism.”

Excerpted from: Stevens, Mark A., Ed. Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Encyclopedia. Springfield, Massachusetts: Merriam-Webster, 2000.

Bessie Smith

It’s finally starting to feel like spring in New England, for which I am grateful. In celebration of spring, and of Women’s History Month 2019, here is a reading on Bessie Smith, the justly named “Empress of the Blues,”  with an accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Abigail Adams’ Prescience on Law and Gender

“In the new Code of Laws which I suppose it will be necessary for you to make I desire that you would Remember the Ladies, and be more generous and favorable to them than your ancestors. Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the Husbands. Remember all Men would be tyrants if they could. If perticular [sic] care and attention is not paid to the ladies we are determined to foment a Rebelion [sic], and will not hold ourselves bound by any Laws in which we have no voice, or Representation.”

Letter to John Adams, 31 Mar. 1776

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Everyday Edit: Anne Sullivan

Here, on a Monday morning after a fabulously spring-like weekend, which I passed in the charming Westchester County town of Katonah, New York, is an Everyday Edit worksheet on Anne Sullivan, Helen Keller’s legendary teacher.

Incidentally, if you or your students like using these short exercises in your classroom, the good people at Education World generously distribute, at no cost, a yearlong supply of these Everyday Edit worksheets. At my current posting, I am required to use a scripted curriculum, so I cannot employ these in my classroom. In the past, however, I’ve used them regularly to good effect with struggling learners. In fact, I have placed them in lesson plans where appropriate.

Mary Cassatt

“1844-1929) U.S. painter and printmaker, active in Paris. Born in Allegheny City, Pa., she spend her early years traveling in Europe with her wealthy family. She attended the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (1860-65) and later studied in Paris, copying old masters. She became a close friend of E. Degas, who influenced her style and encouraged her to exhibit with the Impressionists, of whose work she became a tireless champion. She portrayed scenes of everyday life, particularly images of mothers and children, ans was skilled at drawing and printmaking. Some of her best works were executed in pastel. Through her social contacts with wealthy private collectors, she promoted Impressionism in the U.S. and exerted a lasting influence on U.S. taste.”

Excerpted from: Stevens, Mark A., Ed. Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Encyclopedia. Springfield, Massachusetts: Merriam-Webster, 2000.

The Weekly Text, March 15, 2019

Another Friday has rolled around, and on this one, for some reason in my school district, we are not required to report to work.

Continuing with posts in observation of Women’s History Month 2019, here is a reading on soccer legend Mia Hamm with its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. This is high interest material, especially for girls and young women involved in sports, particularly, obviously, soccer.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.