Word Root Exercise: Equ/Equi

It’s 51 degrees at 5:10 this morning in The Bronx, This is the first weather approximating autumn this year. On Wednesday, it was 80 degrees here. Weird.

Here is a worksheet on the Latin word roots equ and equi. As you no doubt recognize, as, let’s hope, your student do as well, these two roots simply mean equal.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Diamela Eltit

“(1949-) Chilean novelist, performance artist, and teacher. Eltit has written some of the most brilliant and difficult books to emerge from Latin America since the so-called Boom. A literature of transgression, it uses multiple linguistic and narrative sources, displaces plot as a central concern, and shows uncertain characters in an equally uncertain interior terrain, yet still makes reference to the social crises of the external world. Sexuality and its deviations, social inequality, the shame of convention, and the overwhelming and exclusionary nature of power are recurrent concerns. The writing carries off such heavy themes through fractured diction and syntax. Works like Lumperica (1983) and El cuarto mundo (1988) defy the rational conventions of the novel to present writing which is, like the human body, mutable, ungainly, and often as ugly as it is beautiful.”

Excerpted from: Murphy, Bruce, ed. Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia, Fourth Edition. New York: Harper Collins, 1996.

The Weekly Text, October 12, 2018

Today is the final Friday of Hispanic Heritage Month 2018. This week’s Text is this reading on the Inca rebel Tupac Amaru II and the comprehension worksheet that accompanies it. If you recognize this anti-colonialist hero’s name, it’s very likely because the late rapper Tupac Amaru Shakur was named for him.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

John Leguizamo on Miami

“God’s waiting room.”

John Leguizamo

Excerpted from: Winokur, Jon, ed. The Big Curmudgeon. New York: Black Dog & Leventhal, 2007.

Cultural Literacy: Appalachian Mountains

Mark’s Text Terminal is about to move to another state, so I spent the day dealing with that. Here, as I wind things down, is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Appalachian Mountains.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

El Cristo de espaldas

“(1952) A novel by Eduardo Caballero Calderon (1910-1993). Written in a realistic, documentary style, this is the story of a young man suspected of political parricide during Colombia’s civil wars (1948-1958). In a parallel development, a young priest, who has remained neutral in the war, learns the identity of the real murderer in confession. His vow of silence renders him an outcast of the town and of the church. The bishop deprives him of his parish in the belief that “Christ has turned his back” on the priest, but the priest understands that it is men who have turned on Christ.”

Excerpted from: Murphy, Bruce, ed. Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia, Fourth Edition. New York: Harper Collins, 1996.

Word Root Exercise: Ante

Here is a worksheet on the Latin word root ante. It means before and shows up in the Spanish conjunction, preposition and adverb antes de (again, before).

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.