Tag Archives: homophones

Populace (n) and Populous (adj)

It’s chilly in Springfield, Massachusetts this morning, though nothing like the New England winters I remember 40 years ago. Still, the 19-degree temperatures at the moment aren’t exactly summoning. So I’ll sit here for another hour or so working on blog posts.

To that end, here are five worksheets on the homophones populace and populous.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Pore (n/v), Poor (adj), and Pour (v)

On a rainy Saturday morning (aside: should it be pouring rain in New England on January 5th? Shouldn’t this be snow?), Mark’s Text Terminal is humming right along. Here are five worksheets on the homophones pore, poor, and pour. A few notes about these words: pore as a verb is apparently only used intransitively, and in its most common application in English is used with the adverb over; as a verb, pour can be used both intransitively and transitively. While these worksheets don’t address it, pour can also be used as a noun, and can mean the action of pouring,  and instance of pouring or an amount poured, and a heavy fall of rain: DOWNPOUR.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Peak (n) and Peek (n/v)

Moving right along: if your students need help differentiating them, here are five worksheets on the homophones peak and peek. You probably already know this, but peek as a verb is used only intransitively.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Hear (vt/vi) and Here (n)

These five worksheets on the homophones hear and here might be useful in a variety of settings, and I think English language learners might benefit from them.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Isle (n) and Aisle (n)

Monday again, so I’ll begin another week with these five worksheets on the homophones isle and aisle.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, November 20, 2018

As we head into the long holiday weekend, let me offer these five homophone worksheets on the nouns prophet and profit, which also use profit as an intransitive verb; the verb can also be used transitively in the sense of “to be of service to.”

Happy Thanksgiving!

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Role (n), Roll (n), and Roll (vt/vi)

Here’s a series of five homophone worksheets on the noun role, the noun roll, and the verb, used both transitively and intransitively, roll. In general, and only this conclusion requires only scant thought, roll as these two parts of speech is a very busy polysemous word.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.