Tag Archives: homophones

The Weekly Text, November 18, 2019

This week’s Text is a set of five worksheets on the homophones sight (noun), site (noun and transitive verb), and cite (transitive verb). These are very commonly used words in the English language. For some learners, these are easily confused. Part of the reason I wrote this was to help students who needed to learn to cite sources for research papers. I took it as an opportunity to do some vocabulary building. These are short exercises for opening a class period after a transition.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Click (vt/vi/n) and Clique (n)

If one pronounces the noun clique in its French phonetic, it will sound like “kleek,” which renders these five worksheets on the the near homophones click and clique more or less inaccurate. However, if one pronounces clique as it is commonly done in the the United States, like click, then the five worksheets above will indeed serve as homophone worksheets.

In any case, these worksheets offer students–particularly English language learners–a chance to understand clique which is almost inarguably a word and concept students should know by the time they graduate high school.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

 

Canvas (n) and Canvass (vi/vt)

Here, at the end of an unbelievably dismal, pointless day of work, is a set of five homophone worksheets on the noun canvas and the verb–used both intransitively and transitively–canvass.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Born (adj) and Borne (adj)

While I sit her waiting for a Time Machine backup to finish, here is a set of five homophone worksheets on the adjectives born and borne.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, September 6, 2019

Ok, today marks the end of my second week of work at Mount Anthony Union High School in Bennington, Vermont. It sure is nice to be back in Vermont after twenty-three years away. As fall approaches, I anticipate the mountainside colors of October with great pleasure. I’ve never lived in this part of the state before, but I hope to spend the rest of my working life here.

Anyway, this week’s Text is a complete lesson plan on the interrogative. pronoun. I begin this lesson with this worksheet on the homophones you’re and your. Should classroom events stall this lesson, here is a second short exercise, this on a Cultural Literacy worksheet on plagiarism. Finally, here is the structured, scaffolded worksheet on the interrogative pronoun that is the mainstay of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, August 23, 2019

Here in Vermont, one notices the summer winding down at this time in August. There is a hint of autumn in the air, and in the way the light falls on this beautiful landscape.

Here are five worksheets on the homophones feat and feet to suffice for this week’s Text.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Taut (adj) and Taught (vi/vt)

Here are five homophone worksheets on the adjective taut (it’s also, interestingly, used as a transitive verb to mean mat and tangle in Scots English) and taught, the past tense and past participle of the verb teach, which is used both intransitively and transitively.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.