Tag Archives: homophones

A Complete Lesson Plan on Using the Predicate Adjective

Here is a lesson plan on using the predicate adjective in short, declarative sentences. The syntax of these kinds of short sentences, which is subject-linking verb-adjective, is one of the most common constructions in English speech and prose. For that reason, I have included a lesson on the predicate adjective on each of the first three units on parts of speech, to wit nouns, verbs, and adjectives, that I wrote about ten years ago and have revised ever since.

That’s a long way around explaining that you will see lessons on using the predicate adjective in grammatically complete declarative sentences at least a couple of more times.

In any case, I open this lesson with this worksheet on the homophones compliment and complement. Because the noun complement is often used as a synonym for predicate in grammar manuals, and I think it’s important that students know how to use grammar manuals, I want them to know this word. This scaffolded worksheet is the mainstay of this lesson; here is the teachers’ copy of it. Finally, here is an adjectives word bank. Please notice  that this document has four copies of the same word list–it’s meant to be cut in four pieces in a paper-saving measure.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Grizzly (adj), Grisly (adj)

These five worksheets on the homophones grizzly and grisly–they’re both adjectives–are the last set of homophone worksheets in my data warehouse. In all, I wrote 72 sets of five worksheets for a variety of these kinds of words; that means there are 360 of these worksheets on Mark’s Text Terminal. To find them, simply look at the word cloud, click on “homophones” and every post containing these documents should appear.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Eminent (adj), Imminent (adj), and Immanent (adj)

Ok, folks, here is a set of five worksheets on the homophones eminent, imminent, and immanent. They’re all adjectives; the first two are in quite common use in English. The third, immanent, I’ve really only encountered as a term of art in philosophy and theology. Perhaps it’s not a word high schoolers need to know, but it certainly won’t harm them–other than possibly to arouse an interest in being a philosophy or theology major.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Complete Lesson Plan on Nouns as the Indirect Objects of Verbs

OK, folks, here is the big post of the day, to wit, a complete lesson plan on nouns as the indirect objects of verbs. I open this lesson with this worksheet on homophones worksheet on the verbs (and nouns) compliment and complement. Here is the scaffolded worksheet at the center of this lesson; here too is teacher’s copy of the worksheet.

Now a few quick words of explanation. The verb and noun complement is often used in grammar manuals to describe predicates consisting of direct and indirect objects (and by the way, I posted a lesson plan on nouns as the direct objects of verbs a few days back that works well with this lesson), so I want students to recognize that meaning of this polysemous word when they see it. As I mentioned in the post on direct objects, this point of grammar will help students when they undertake to study a foreign language. Direct and indirect objects, particularly in inflected languages, require different case endings. For example, in Russian the direct object takes the accusative case ending, but indirect objects are in the dative case.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Hardy (adj), Hearty (adj)

To close out working for the day, here are five worksheets on the homophones (or near homophones, depending on where you live) hardy and hearty. They’re close in meaning, and they’re both adjectives.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Complete Lesson Plan on Nouns as the Direct Objects of Verbs

Here is a lesson plan on nouns as direct objects of verbs in clauses and sentences. I open this lesson with this worksheet on the homophones compliment and complement as both nouns and verbs. Nota bene that many grammar manuals use complement as a noun to designate the direct object of a verb, so I want students to recognize it if they encounter it in such a book. Finally, here is the scaffolded worksheet that is at the center of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Heal (vi/vt), Heel (n)

Here are five worksheets on the homophones heal and heel, used respectively as an intransitive and transitive verb, and a noun.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.