Tag Archives: homophones

Ball (n) and Bawl (verb)

Here are five worksheets on the homophones ball and bawl, a noun and a verb with both intransitive and transitive uses.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Bare (adj), Bear (n), and Bear (vt/vi)

Here are five worksheets on the homophones bare and bear. They’re short, and therefore, in my classroom, useful for a number of purposes, most commonly to begin an instructional period after a class transition.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Midsummer Text, July 2018

Here are five worksheets on the homophones two, too, and to, which I am confident you have noticed that are frequently confused–sometimes to hilarious effect (i.e. Dumb and Dumber To), but more often just, well, confusing effect.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

You’re (pron/v contraction) and Your (pron)

Here, on a cool Saturday morning in July, are five worksheets on the homophones you’re and your.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, June 28, 2018

Today is June 28, 2018. Today is the anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, nearly 50 years ago. We’ve made real progress in this country in respecting the rights of the LGBTQ community, which is not to say we don’t have more progress to make on civil rights for this and all communities. (By the way, the Stonewall Inn is still right there on Sheridan Square in the West Village. Stop in for a drink some time–it’s a very friendly place whatever your sexual orientation happens to be.) Today is the birthday of an American national treasure, the incomparable Mel Brooks. Born Melvyn Kaminsky right here in New York City, he is ninety years old today.

This week’s Text is a complete lesson plan on the using the interrogative pronoun. I start this lesson with this homophone worksheet on the contraction you’re and the possessive pronoun your. If for some reason (and there are often plenty of reasons for this) the lesson goes into a second day, I like to keep nearby this Cultural Literacy worksheet on plagiarism, which I use with other lessons as well (I find one cannot emphasize the issue of plagiarism enough). The center of this lesson this scaffolded worksheet on using the interrogative pronoun. Finally, here is the teacher’s copy of the worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Learning Support for Three Commonly Misused Homophones

Several years ago, when I had just started dealing with the problem of homophone confusion among the students I serve, I whipped up this basic learning support on three of the most commonly misused homophones, to wit, two, too and to; your and you’re; and there their, and they’re. I need to emphasize the modifier basic here, because this is about as basic as it gets. Over time I will post more sophisticated versions of this.

In fact, I almost just tossed this. But since I have 13 GB of storage on this website, and only a little over 2 GB of accumulated material (which is nonetheless about 14,000 documents), I figure I can afford to duplicate a few things, and place a few things that haven’t exactly reached the peak of their development. In fact, that’s exactly what you have here.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Which (adj/pron) and Witch (n)

Here are five worksheets on the homophones which and witch. In my classrooms, over the years, these two are very commonly confused, most often with the latter standing in where the former belongs.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.