Tag Archives: homophones

Material (n.) and Materiel (n.)

Here, for the third day of 2018, are five homophone worksheets on the nouns material and materiel.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, December 22, 2017

Like my colleagues, I guess, I’ve been counting down to today, the final day of school before our holiday break here in New York City. I don’t intend to post a Weekly Text next week, so I’ll close out 2017 with these five worksheets on the homophones there, their, and they’re. I assume I needn’t belabor the point that these are some of the most commonly confused homophones out there.

That’s it:  See you on Friday, January 5, 2018, with a new Weekly Text–a full lesson on adverbs.

Happy New Year!

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Pair (n.), Pare (vt.), and Pear (n.)

If you can use them, here are five homophone worksheets on the noun pair, the transitive verb pare, and the noun pear. I just wrote these, though at the moment I’m not sure why.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, November 17, 2017

This week’s Text continues with the parts of speech, to wit a complete lesson plan introducing students to the use of conjunctions. To begin this lesson, I use this homophone worksheet on the adjective bare, along with bear as both a noun and a verb. The mainstay of this lesson is a scaffolded worksheet on coordinating conjunctions. Your students might benefit from the use of this learning support on the use of conjunctions. Finally, here is the teacher’s copy of the worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Block (n.) and Bloc (n.)

Here are five homophone worksheets on the nouns block and bloc that you might find useful.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Counsel (vt./vi) and Council (n.)

You might find these five homophone worksheets on the nouns counsel and council useful. As the header indicates, counsel can also be used as both a transitive and an intransitive verb; indeed, these worksheets to call upon students to use counsel as a verb.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

July 25, 2017: A Midsummer Text

I’ve been working on a series of new homophone worksheets, including these five on the who’s and whose and this learning support to accompany them.

I assume you see these words confused regularly, as they are two of the most commonly confused homophones in the English language. Writing these worksheets, I’m afraid I let the material get away from me. Endeavoring to create materials that helped students form their own, comprehensive, understanding of these two words, I wrote a lot of text that I realized, after it was down on paper, was too much information for worksheet instructions. I turned quite a bit of the text into the learning support post in this Text. However, the worksheets themselves still may be prolix by virtue of the still-lengthy definitions of these two words and their definitions,

In any case, these are Word documents, so you may manipulate them for your use.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.