Tag Archives: homophones

Wait (vi, vt, n), Weight (n)

Good morning, eh?

Here are five worksheets on the homophones wait, which as a verb is used both intransitively and transitively, but is also used as a noun (“The tourists had a long wait for the A train to Harlem”), and weight, which is used as a noun.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Soul (n), Sole (n, adj)

Can you use these five worksheets on the homophones soul (as a noun) and sole (as a noun and an adjective)? As I was pasting them together yesterday, I found myself wondering whether I should have named the species of fish as well in these worksheets.

As with virtually everything else at Mark’s Text Terminal, these are Microsoft Word documents, so it would be easy enough to add another word or two.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Soar (vi) and Sore (adj)

Here are five worksheets on the homophones soar and sore.

Soar is an intransitive verb, though it also has use as a noun, meaning “the range, distance, or height attained in soaring” and “the act of soaring: upward flight.” The noun isn’t tagged as archaic in Merriam-Webster’s; I don’t know about you, but I’ve never used soar as a noun.

Sore, of course, is an adjective, and it’s how you feel after an injury or other trauma, or after intense exercise.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Faint (adj, vi, n), Feint (n, vi/vt)

Here are five worksheets on the homophones faint and feint. These are relatively complicated words: faint is, as above, an adjective, a verb used only intransitively, and a noun (only the first two parts of speech, the adjective and the verb, are dealt with on these worksheets). Feint is a noun and a verb used both intransitively and transitively, and is only dealt with as a verb on these worksheets. Students probably ought to know both of these words; in any case, this worksheet presents an opportunity to deal with the parts of speech and using words properly in speech and prose.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Descent (n), Dissent (vi/n)

This set of five homophone worksheets builds vocabulary and helps students differentiate between the noun descent, and dissent, which is used both as a verb (intransitively only, apparently) and a noun.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cue (n, vi/vt) Queue (n, vi/vt)

Here are five worksheets on the homophones cue and queue. Both are used as nouns and verbs, and as verbs they can be used both intransitively and transitively. These words are in common enough use in English that I think these words ought to be able to find a place in most English classrooms, particularly for English language learners.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Way (n) and Weigh (vt/vi)

Snow falls heavily as I sit down to write this, so I’ll soon wrap up my day and leave to take advantage of this half day. Before I go, however, here are five homophone worksheets on the noun way and the verb weigh. Weigh, for the record, is used both transitively and intransitively.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.