Tag Archives: homophones

The Weekly Text, April 13, 2018

It’s Friday the thirteenth, and so far nothing bad has happened in my tiny corner of the universe; I hope the same is true for you.

This week’s Text is a complete lesson plan on using adverbs of time. I begin this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on anthropomorphism. However, if the concept of anthropomorphism is too abstract for your students, or if this lesson enters a second day, then here is a homophone worksheet on the nouns profit and prophet that may well be useful to you in other areas of your practice. When teaching this lesson, I also use this learning support which might also be useful elsewhere in your classroom; it’s in Microsoft Word, in any case, so it will be easy to bend to your needs. Here is the structured, scaffolded worksheet that is the mainstay of this lesson. Finally, here is the teacher’s copy of the worksheet to guide you in guiding your students.

And that’s it for another week. I hope spring has sprung where you live. The first azaleas are in bloom in the New York Botanical Garden, which is pleasant indeed.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, January 26, 2018

It’s the end of a week of New York State Regents Testing, so inanity has been the theme. I’m glad, once more, that it has come to an end. I guess the less said about this horrorshow (and subsidy to crummy educational publishing companies) the better.

This week’s Text is five short exercises on the homophones allude and elude. These are a couple of words students ought to know. Allude is an intransitive verb, often used with a prepositional phrase beginning with to–e.g. “Gabriel regularly alludes to James Joyce’s Finnegan’s Wake when the subject of modernist literature comes up.” Elude, on the other hand, is transitive and requires a simple direct object: “The students cutting class eluded the dean.”

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Material (n.) and Materiel (n.)

Here, for the third day of 2018, are five homophone worksheets on the nouns material and materiel.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, December 22, 2017

Like my colleagues, I guess, I’ve been counting down to today, the final day of school before our holiday break here in New York City. I don’t intend to post a Weekly Text next week, so I’ll close out 2017 with these five worksheets on the homophones there, their, and they’re. I assume I needn’t belabor the point that these are some of the most commonly confused homophones out there.

That’s it:  See you on Friday, January 5, 2018, with a new Weekly Text–a full lesson on adverbs.

Happy New Year!

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Pair (n.), Pare (vt.), and Pear (n.)

If you can use them, here are five homophone worksheets on the noun pair, the transitive verb pare, and the noun pear. I just wrote these, though at the moment I’m not sure why.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, November 17, 2017

This week’s Text continues with the parts of speech, to wit a complete lesson plan introducing students to the use of conjunctions. To begin this lesson, I use this homophone worksheet on the adjective bare, along with bear as both a noun and a verb. The mainstay of this lesson is a scaffolded worksheet on coordinating conjunctions. Your students might benefit from the use of this learning support on the use of conjunctions. Finally, here is the teacher’s copy of the worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Block (n.) and Bloc (n.)

Here are five homophone worksheets on the nouns block and bloc that you might find useful.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.