Tag Archives: homophones

Boarder (n) and Border (n)

Here are five worksheets on the homophones boarder and border, both presented here as nouns. Border also serves as both an adjective and a verb.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Lessen (v) and Lesson (n)

Here on a rainy Monday are five homophone worksheets on the verb lessen and the noun lesson to build vocabulary, reinforce good English usage, and resolve confusion about these soundalikes.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Its (Possessive Pronoun) and It’s (Contraction)

Today is September 2. Today is the anniversary of the implementation–in Britain and its colonies–of the Calendar (New Style) Act 1750, which made the “Georgian Correction” in 1752. On this day in 1945, the official ratification of Japan’s surrender to the victorious allies in World War II occurred aboard the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay. In Vietnam, today is National Day, which celebrates that nation’s independence from France.

Here are five homophone worksheets on its and it’s. I guess, strictly speaking, these aren’t really homophones, since they both employ it, a neuter pronoun with a fixed meaning. These worksheets really address the punctuation of these words. Students, particularly English language learners in my experience, accustomed to forming the possessive case of nouns with an apostrophe find the punctuation of these two words counterintuitive. Thus,  these worksheets to provide some practical experience using this pronoun in these two forms in sentences.

The worksheets themselves have a somewhat lengthy excursus, in their definition of its, on pronoun-antecedent agreement when using this possessive pronoun. That material derives from my study, a few years back, of the Trivium and its possibilities for use in my classroom. The book I read went on at some length, as I recall, about the importance to logic and grammar of not using locutions like “the committee did their work” and favoring “the committee did its work”.  I suspect that in some cases that material would be better deployed on an entirely separate series of worksheets that contrast its and their in pronoun-antecedent grammar exercises.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, August 31, 2018

Sigh. Today is August 31st, and the summer is effectively over for this teacher. For the first time since I started working at my current posting in Lower Manhattan, I am dreading returning to work.

This week’s Text is five worksheets on the homophones plain and plane, both nouns.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Peace (n), Piece (n)

Today is August 25. It’s the 100th birthday of the great–if mildly controversial–Leonard Bernstein. On this day in 1944, the Second French Armored Division liberated Paris from Nazi occupation. Today is Independence Day in Uruguay. Finally, it is the birthday of the first (and to those of us who grew up with him in the role, the best) James Bond, Sean Connery.

Can you, by any chance, use these five homophone worksheets on the nouns peace and piece?

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Parsing Sentences Worksheets: Adverbs

Here, if you can use them, are four parsing sentences worksheets for adverbs. I use these in a variety of ways in my classroom, hence the plethora of categories and tags.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Marshall (n) and Marshal (vt/vi)

Here are five worksheets on the homophones marshall and marshal used, respectively, as a noun and a verb. The verb, particularly, strikes me as something high school students should know, particularly if teachers are assigning research papers and asking students to marshal evidence to support arguments.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.