Tag Archives: homophones

Palate (n), Palette (n), and Pallet (n)

I’m not sure how fine any teacher wants to parse out vocabulary instructions, or what that same teacher considers an adequate high school lexicon. If your instructional plans call for sorting out the myriad homonyms in the English language, and you want to assist your students in building their own broad vocabularies, then these five worksheets on the nouns palate, palette, and pallet  may be of some utility to you.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Lead (n) and Led (vt/vi)

These five worksheets on the homophones lead and led are not exactly the most cogent ever to issue from my pen. They do stand on their own, I think, and with some tinkering (which I may get to in the future, and since these are in Microsoft Word and can be manipulated, you can get to whenever you see fit) they might increase in cogency and therefore effectiveness.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, January 18, 2019

This week’s Text is a complete lesson plan on using coordinating conjunctions. I open this exercise with this homophone worksheet on the homophones desert and dessert; while I realize that these two words, properly pronounced, aren’t really homophones, these are nonetheless words that students (and adults for that matter) frequently confuse, so I think it’s worth taking a moment to help them sort out these two words. Should this lesson stumble into another day for any reason, here is an everyday edit on Ludwig van Beethoven–and if you like Everyday Edit worksheets, the generous people at Education World have a yearlong supply of them posted as giveaways.

This structured worksheet of modified cloze exercises is the mainstay of this lesson; here too (contrived for the teacher’s ease of use) is the the teacher’s copy and answer key for the worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Populace (n) and Populous (adj)

It’s chilly in Springfield, Massachusetts this morning, though nothing like the New England winters I remember 40 years ago. Still, the 19-degree temperatures at the moment aren’t exactly summoning. So I’ll sit here for another hour or so working on blog posts.

To that end, here are five worksheets on the homophones populace and populous.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Pore (n/v), Poor (adj), and Pour (v)

On a rainy Saturday morning (aside: should it be pouring rain in New England on January 5th? Shouldn’t this be snow?), Mark’s Text Terminal is humming right along. Here are five worksheets on the homophones pore, poor, and pour. A few notes about these words: pore as a verb is apparently only used intransitively, and in its most common application in English is used with the adverb over; as a verb, pour can be used both intransitively and transitively. While these worksheets don’t address it, pour can also be used as a noun, and can mean the action of pouring,  and instance of pouring or an amount poured, and a heavy fall of rain: DOWNPOUR.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Peak (n) and Peek (n/v)

Moving right along: if your students need help differentiating them, here are five worksheets on the homophones peak and peek. You probably already know this, but peek as a verb is used only intransitively.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Hear (vt/vi) and Here (n)

These five worksheets on the homophones hear and here might be useful in a variety of settings, and I think English language learners might benefit from them.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.