Tag Archives: homophones

The Weekly Text, June 21, 2019

OK, here, very simply, because I am exhausted on this first Friday of the summer break, are five homophone worksheets on the nouns capital and capitol. Right off the top of my head, looking at these, I can see a number of ways to edit and revise them to take students more deeply into these words and the concepts they represent.

That’s it. I hope you’re enjoying nice weather and the free time to get out in it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, June 7, 2019

On Tuesday of this week I posted a complete lesson on using personal pronouns in the nominative case. For this week’s, Text, let’s go to the other side of the sentence.

Here is a complete lesson plan on using the personal pronoun in the objective case. I begin this lesson, after a class transition in order to get students settled, with this Everyday Edit on Iqbal Masih, Child Activist (if you and your students like Everyday Edit worksheets, you can help yourself to a yearlong supply of them at no cost by clicking on that hyperlink); in the event that the lesson spills over into a second day, here is a worksheet on the homophones there, their, and they’re.

The center of this lesson is this scaffolded worksheet on using the personal pronoun in the objective case. Finally, here is the learning support on pronouns and case that I also included on the original post, last Tuesday, on using the personal pronoun in the nominative case.

And that’s it for the penultimate week of the school year here in Springfield, Massachusetts.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Allusion (n) and Illusion (n)

Moving right along on a Sunday morning, here are five worksheets on the homophones allusion and illusion. They’re both nouns, and both are words high schoolers ought to know and be able to use properly.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Principal (n) and Principle (n)

On a rainy Tuesday morning, here are five homophone worksheets on the nouns principal and principle, which are in common enough use in both basic communication and academic discourse to merit students’ attention.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Compliment (n) and Complement (n)

These five worksheets on the homophones compliment and complement are actually the first I ever wrote. You’ll notice that I set up the worksheets to use these words as nouns. Because it turns up as a term of art in any number of grammar and style manuals, I wanted students to learn the use of complement as a grammatical term. It’s used in all kinds of ways, even sometimes to describe a predicate, which I think is better called, simply, a predicate.

However, as a means of describing both the direct objects and the indirect objects of verbs, I think this is a very good word indeed. I’m fairly certain I placed all five of these worksheets as do-now exercises at various places in a thirteen-lesson unit on verbs. If you use them the same way, you may want to mention to students that both of these words can be used as verbs; both are used transitively.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Raise (vt/vi) and Raze (vt)

Here are five worksheets on the homophones raise and raze. These are a couple of words with which students I’ve served struggled.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Palate (n), Palette (n), and Pallet (n)

I’m not sure how fine any teacher wants to parse out vocabulary instructions, or what that same teacher considers an adequate high school lexicon. If your instructional plans call for sorting out the myriad homonyms in the English language, and you want to assist your students in building their own broad vocabularies, then these five worksheets on the nouns palate, palette, and pallet  may be of some utility to you.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.