Category Archives: The Weekly Text

The Weekly Text from Mark’s Text Terminal is where one finds manipulable (because they are in Microsoft Word format) curricular materials for use withs struggling learners.

The Weekly Text, October 12, 2018

Today is the final Friday of Hispanic Heritage Month 2018. This week’s Text is this reading on the Inca rebel Tupac Amaru II and the comprehension worksheet that accompanies it. If you recognize this anti-colonialist hero’s name, it’s very likely because the late rapper Tupac Amaru Shakur was named for him.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, October 5, 2018

Here, on the penultimate Friday of Hispanic Heritage Month 2018, here is a reading on Pablo Neruda. You can use that text any number of ways, I would think, but in any case here is the accompanying comprehension worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, September 28, 2018

This week’s Text is a complete lesson plan on the Latin word roots mal and male. They mean, of course, bad, evil, ill, and wrong. This post, like all the material published here between September 15 and October 15, is in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month. This material may stretch the boundaries of the letter of the month’s intent; on the other hand, the Latin language is, like it or not, a key part of Hispanic Heritage.

Over the years I’ve worked with many native Spanish speakers. My original impulse in writing word root worksheets, particularly those dealing with Latin roots, arose from the idea that helping students develop their own understanding of the Latin language as a bridge to English would hasten their journey to bilingualism. Ideally, students will retain their Spanish language skills while building their English vocabularies and understand the way these roots show up across the spectrum of Romance languages–often in the exact same words.

Here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective sinister to hint at the meaning of the roots mal and male, thereby pointing them in the right direction. This scaffolded worksheet is the mainstay of the lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, September 21, 2018

As I sit down to post this Text, I realize that I’ve run through, in the past week, just about all the short materials I have to offer for Hispanic Heritage Month 2018 (if you encounter problems with that link, please advise; it might be the longest URL I’ve ever copied and pasted into WordPress’s link generating module).

This week’s Text is a reading on the Spanish-American War and this comprehension worksheet to accompany it. Both, as with almost all of the documents you find here, are in Microsoft Word and can be adapted for a variety of reading levels and attention spans.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Developing Nations

I think if you combine this Cultural Literacy worksheet on developing nations or use it to preface an opening lesson on colonialism, students would make a connection and move toward an understanding of history as a process. I’ve had a few classes make the connection, but it requires some careful Socratic questioning.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Puerto Rico

Here is a reading on Puerto Rico and a comprehension worksheet to accompany it in observance of Hispanic Heritage Month 2018.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, September 7, 2018

As we go into the long Rosh Hashanah holiday weekend here in New York City, I’d like to wish my Jewish friends, colleagues, students, and neighbors a joyful and safe new year.

Apropo of the holiday (see below as well), here is a worksheet on Shimon Bar-Kokhba, a great Jewish warrior who fought against nearly impossible odds when he took on the Roman Empire under Hadrian. This comprehension worksheet accompanies it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.