Category Archives: The Weekly Text

The Weekly Text from Mark’s Text Terminal is where one finds manipulable (because they are in Microsoft Word format) curricular materials for use withs struggling learners.

Rotten Rejections: Esther Waters

“We like the story ourselves but there are scenes in it such as childbirth in a hospital with full accounts of labor pains, etc., which would hardly go down here and it certainly would excite surprise if published by us.”

Excerpted from: Bernard, Andre, and Bill Henderson, eds. Pushcart’s Complete Rotten Reviews and Rejections. Wainscott, NY: Pushcart Press, 1998.

The Weekly Text, April 19, 2019

OK, as we reach the end of spring break (boo hoo!) here is a short reading on John Steinbeck and the vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet that accompanies it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Bowdlerizing

If you happen to need it, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Thomas Bowdler and the act–essentially a form of censorship–that bears his name, bowdlerizing.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: The Boy Who Cried Wolf

Here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Aesop’s boy who cried wolf.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, April 5, 2019

Several years ago, the school administration under which I then served tasked me with developing math and science vocabulary in a group of struggling students. I wrote a unit on the fly, and then never used it because that fall I was summoned to jury duty (a stint which ended up lasting two months) in Bronx County.

This complete lesson plan on the word simplify and the concept of simplifying is one of the fruits of my labor. As I say, I never had a chance to actually deliver this lesson in the classroom. In any case, I envisioned starting the lesson with this extended context clues worksheet on the transitive verb simplify. The center of this lesson is this worksheet on simplifying numbers that a math teacher and I collaborated on to develop–he actually ended up teaching this lesson in my absence, and so provided some revisions after he’d had a crack at it. Finally, here is a learning support with definitions of the verbs simplify and solve.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Ursula Le Guin Prescribes a Lifestyle

“When action grows unprofitable, gather information; when information grows unprofitable, sleep.”

Ursula Le Guin

The Left Hand of Darkness ch. 3 (1969)

Excerpted from: Shapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

 

The Weekly Text, March 29, 2019

Today marks the end, on Mark’s Text Terminal, of Women’s History Month 2019. When I return on Monday, it will be April Fool’s Day. Here is a reading on JK Rowling and its attendant vocabulary building and comprehension worksheet.

I would think this is high interest material, as Ms. Rowling and her books remain interesting to kids.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.