Category Archives: The Weekly Text

The Weekly Text is a primary feature at Mark’s Text Terminal. This category will include a variety of classroom materials in English Language Arts and social studies, most often in the form of complete lesson plans (see above) in those domains. The Weekly Text is posted on Fridays.

The Weekly Text, 21 January 2022: Two Context Clues Worksheets on the Verbs Coerce and Coax

This week’s Text is a pair of context clues worksheets, one on the verb coax and another on the verb coerce. Both of these verbs are used only transitively, so don’t forget your direct object; you must coax or coerce someone or something. These words are near antonyms. However, I wrote them as a pair to help students develop an understanding of the continuum of connotative meanings in English words. A key question for interrogating these two words is quite simple: When does coaxing turn into coercion?

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, 14 January 2022: A Lesson Plan on the Compound Preposition

This week’s Text is this lesson plan on using compound prepositions.

I open this lesson with this Everyday Edit worksheet on Eleanor Roosevelt; if this lesson goes into a second day, here is another on time zones. Incidentally, if you and your students find these Everyday Edit worksheet edifying (and therefore rewarding), the good people at Education World generously distribute a yearlong supply of them at no charge.

Here is the scaffolded worksheet that is the principal work of this lesson. And, at last, here is the teacher’s copy of same.

And that is it for another week.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, 7 January 2022: A Lesson Plan on the Crime and Puzzlement Case “Trick or Treat”

Happy New Year!

The first Weekly Text of 2022 on Mark’s Text Terminal is this lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Trick or Treat.” I open this lesson with this half-page (with a two-sentence reading and three comprehension questions) Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concept of a “lunatic fringe” in politics, timely material in 2022 wherever you happen to be in the world, I submit.

To conduct your investigation of the heinous crime committed and documented in the pages of this lesson, you’ll need this PDF of the evidentiary illustration and questions that form the center of this case. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key that will aid you in making an arrest and closing this case.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Ject

Here is a worksheet on the Latin word root ject. It means, simply, “to throw.” This is an extremely productive root in English, found in high-frequency words like eject, inject, reject, projectile, and trajectory.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, 17 December 2021: A Lesson Plan on the Denominations of U.S. Coins from The Order of Things

The final Text for 2021 is a lesson plan on coin denomination in United States currency with its list as reading and comprehension questions. This material is adapted from The Order of Things, Barbara Ann Kipfer’s enviable reference book. This is relatively simple material, designed to aid students who struggle with the kind of reading and analytical skills that are presented by, for example, word problems in math.

Like most things on Mark’s Text Terminal, these documents are formatted in Microsoft Word, so you can alter them to suit the needs of your students.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, 10 December 2021: A Concluding Assessment Lesson Plan on Pronouns

This week’s Text is final lesson plan of the pronouns unit that I’ve been posting piecemeal for the past couple of years. This is the 13th lesson in the unit and the concluding assessment. Nota bene, please, that is is emphatically not a test, but rather a supported assessment that, as the plan will explain, aims to assist students in developing their own understanding of a number of pieces of discrete procedural knowledge. This lesson should take place over a couple of days, if not three.

Accordingly, I’ve lined up three Everyday Edit worksheets to serve as do-nows for this lesson: the first on Susan B. Anthony; the second on Harriet Tubman; and the third on Jane Goodall. Incidentally, if you and your students find these Everyday Edit worksheets useful, or even enjoyable, as students I have served in the past (to my considerable surprise) have, then I have good news for you: the good people at Education World give away a yearlong supply of them.

There are two supports for this lesson (which students used during earlier lessons, so they will be familiar with them if you too have used them), the first on pronouns and case (with the verb to be conjugated for contextual support), the second on the use of indefinite pronouns  (e.g. someone, anyone, everybody, all, etc).

Finally, here is the worksheet for this lesson, which is really more of a graphic organizer. It guides students through all the lessons they have completed for this unit.

And that, esteemed reader, is it. There is now a 13-lesson unit on pronouns available on this site; simply type pronouns into the search bar in the upper-right-hand corner of the home page, and you will find them all.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, 2 December 2021: A Lesson Plan on the Crime and Puzzlement Case “Westward Ho-Hum!”

This week’s Text is a lesson plan on the the Crime and Puzzlement case “Westward Ho-Hum!” I open this lesson with this half-page Cultural Literacy worksheet (with a two-sentence reading and three comprehension questions) on the Gallicism esprit de corps. To fortify this document with a bit of context, Merriam-Webster defines this noun as denoting “the common spirit existing in the members of a group and inspiring enthusiasm, devotion, and strong regard for the honor of the group.”

To investigate this case, your students will need this PDF of the illustration and questions that serve as both evidence and procedure of inquiry into this heinous crime. Finally, to solve your case and apprehend a suspect, here is the typescript of the answer key.

And that’s it for this week. I hope you and yours enjoyed a relaxed and (if this is your bent), suitably gluttonous Thanksgiving.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, 19 November 2021: A Reading and Comprehension Worksheet on the Interstate Highway System

The passage of President Biden’s signature legislation, the Build Back Better Bill, strikes me as a perfect occasion to post as this week’s Text this reading on interstate highways in the United States, along with its vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. I think it’s important to note that a Republican president, Dwight D. Eisenhower, advanced the legislation enabling the construction of a national highway system of the scope our our interstates. What I mean to say here is that once upon a time, Republicans didn’t march in lockstep with each other in holding the idea that government investments in public works is “socialism.”

We take these highways for granted now, but when they were built, they eased shipping and leisure travel to an extent I think we now find difficult to imagine. They also homogenized American commercial culture and, over time, reduced regionalism, which as anyone familiar with the phrase “The Old Weird America” will understand and probably regret. Can I buy you lunch at Perkins/Stuckeys/McDonald’s/Cracker Barrel/Burger King ad nauseam (in some cases literally)?

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, 12 November 2012: A Review Lesson on the Use of Pronouns in Declarative Sentences

This week’s Text is the penultimate lesson in the 13-lesson unit on pronouns I engineered several years ago, and have been working on ever since. It is basically a pre-assessment review lesson to prepare student for the final lesson, a guided mastery exercise in which they review and recapitulate all the foregoing lessons.

I open this lesson with this Everyday Edit worksheet on “Women Get the Vote.” If the lesson enters a second day for whatever reason, here is another Everyday Edit, this one on Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Here is the scaffolded worksheet for this lesson that is its primary work. Finally, here is the teacher’s copy of same. I’ll put up the final lesson soon, and then there will be a 13-lesson unit on pronouns available in its entirety on Mark’s Text Terminal.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, 5 November 2021: A Lesson Plan on the Crime and Puzzlement Case “False Alarm”

This week’s Text is a lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement Case “False Alarm.” I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Gallicism enfant terrible.

To conduct your investigation of this misdemeanor, you’ll need this PDF of the illustration and questions that serve as evidence and interrogative in the case. And here is the typescript of the answer key. And that’s it for another week.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.