Category Archives: The Weekly Text

The Weekly Text from Mark’s Text Terminal is where one finds manipulable (because they are in Microsoft Word format) curricular materials for use withs struggling learners.

The Weekly Text, June 23, 2017

Summer break is nigh upon us here in New York City, and not a moment too soon. For the past couple of weeks we have endured the inanity of the New York State Regents Examinations.

This week’s Text is a complete lesson on using the predicate adjective in declarative sentences. There are two do-now worksheets to accompany this lesson in the event that the lesson runs into two days: the first is an Everyday Edit on Laura Ingalls Wilder; the second is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the common Latinism in English, nota bene. This lesson also provides a a word bank of predicate adjectives that serves as a learning support. You’ll need this scaffolded worksheet on the predicate adjectives for your students; to deliver this lesson, I find it’s handy to have this teacher’s copy and answer key.

That’s it. I hope this is useful to you.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, June 16, 2017

Since the idea of success is something schools now flog, albeit in a vapid and decontextualized sense, we should not be surprised to learn that when we talk, in our social studies classes, about successors–to thrones, offices, and the like–our students understand this as someone who has experienced success, rather than someone who has succeeded in the sense of following someone else in a position of power or authority.

This week’s Text, in an attempt to clear up this misconception, is three context clues worksheets on succession, successor, and successive, which are, respectively, a noun, a noun, and an adjective.

That’s it: I hope you find these useful.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, June 9, 2017

If you deal with student writing, I’ll hazard a guess that you’ve seen in it more than once confusion between the transitive (mostly) and intransitive (so used in some instances) verb accept and the multi-purpose–it serves as both a transitive and intransitive verb, as well as a preposition and a conjunction–word except.

So, for this week’s Text, I offer these five homophone worksheets on accept and except. The first three of them are ten cloze blanks each, then the final two each contain five cloze blanks. If one wanted to make more of these, it wouldn’t be hard, via the miracle of copy and paste, to turn the first three worksheets into six.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, June 2, 2017

OK: It has been some time since I posted an entire lesson plan, so for this week’s Text I offer a complete lesson that introduces students to prepositions. This lesson begins with two (the second one in the event that the lesson runs to two days) do-now exercises, namely Everyday Edits worksheets, the first one on the Surrender at Appomattox and the the second one on the Modern Olympic Games. (Incidentally, if you like these Everyday Edit Worksheets, the good people at Education World give them away at their site, and you will find the answer keys to them there as well.)

The mainstay of this lesson is this scaffolded proofreading and cloze exercise worksheet that introduces students to prepositions and their uses. Here is a learning support on prepositions that accompanies this lesson (and all six lessons in this unit, which I will post over time, I suppose). Finally, here is a teacher’s copy and answer key to assist you as you deliver this lesson.

That’s it. If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, May 26, 2017

For this week’s Text, heading into the Memorial Day weekend I assume most of us so badly need, I offer you this context clues worksheet on the transitive verb equip, and this one on the verb, also transitive, provision. These words mean roughly the same thing, excepting the the second definition of equip, which is transitive and means prepared. The second definition is used more as a participle with a linking verb.

For some reason, this draft blog post has lingered in my folder for a few months, and I cannot imagine why, or what my purpose was in putting it there in the first place. I think I wrote the above two context clues worksheets for a global studies lesson, then just folded them into this post. In using them, I recall I was surprised at how few students knew the verb equip. As a verb, I guess, provision is a little less often used to describe the act or preparation for an event, usually an expedition of some kind. That said, I can hear Shelby Foote, describing a battle in Ken Burns’ Civil War Documentary and using provision as a verb.

Anyway, to complement the worksheets published in the first paragraph, above, I also offer these two worksheets on Greek word roots iatr/o and icon/o. They mean, respectively, healing, medical treatment and image. Unlike other word root worksheets I post, these are short exercises designed to begin a class period by focusing and settling students. As I’ve said before about word roots, a corollary to the vocabulary building benefit of these exercises is passively training students to recognize patterns in language, the kind of deep-structure instruction that scholars in the learning sciences encourage teachers to deliver.

That’s it. I wish you a respectful and appropriately somber Memorial Day.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, May 19, 2017

I meant to post this Intellectual Devotional reading on Cy Young and this reading comprehension worksheet to accompany it several weeks ago, closer to Major League Baseball’s Opening Day. Better late than never, I guess: here is this week’s Text on the legendary pitcher.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, May 12, 2017

In my classroom, I rely almost exclusively on the Socratic method in my teaching for a variety of reasons, the most salient of them is simply that students who are talking in class–i.e. answering questions–are also thinking. As Daniel Willingham, the cognitive scientist at the University of Virginia (with whose work all teachers ought to familiarize themselves) succinctly puts it, “memory is the residue of thought.” If you want your students to retain what you teach them, ask questions that compel–or, one hopes, impel– them to think about the matter at hand in your classroom.

A couple of years ago I read Education for Judgement: The Art of Discussion Leadership by C. Roland Christenson, David A. Garvin, and Ann Sweet and published at the Harvard Business School Press. It’s one of the better books I’ve read for my own professional development, and I highly recommend it. To give you a sense of the riches this book contains for those interested in developing their skills in leading class discussion, I offer as this week’s Text this taxonomy of questions from its pages.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. Since this isn’t my work, I seek no peer review of it (and in any case, it seems like a safe bet that this material has been peer-reviewed by some of the best people in education).