Category Archives: The Weekly Text

The Weekly Text from Mark’s Text Terminal is where one finds manipulable (because they are in Microsoft Word format) curricular materials for use withs struggling learners.

A Lesson Plan on the Simple Present Tense of Verbs

OK, I think this lesson plan on using the simple present tense of verbs speaks for itself and therefore doesn’t require much comment.

I open this lesson with this worksheet on the homophones who’s and whose. These two words (well, a contraction and a word) are quite easily confused, so the explanation for their use is extensive. Students will walk away, after completing this, with a page from a grammar and usage manual. In the event the lesson goes into a second day, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the term and concept expletive.

This scaffolded worksheet is the centerpiece of this unit for students. You might need this word bank to support completion of the worksheet. Finally, here is the teachers’ copy of the worksheet to make getting through the lesson a little easier for you.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Using Modal and Conditional Verbs

This is the second lesson plan on the use of modal and conditional verbs that I’ve posted in the last week. I wrote two of these in order to break up the forms of these verbs and to help students build their understanding of them through extensive practice in their use.

I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the subjunctive mood of verbs. The subjunctive is a challenging area of usage, and I probably need to take a look at both of these lessons on modals and conditionals to make sure the use of the subjunctive is clear. If this lesson goes into a second day, here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on Ida B. Wells, the great journalist (and don’t forget that if you and your students like Everyday Edit worksheets, the generous people at Education World give away a yearlong supply of them at their website).

This scaffolded worksheet and its accompanying learning support  are the central work of this lesson. While the support contains material specific to this lesson, if you remove that from the bottom of the document, and change the header, you will have a learning support on modal verbs that can be used more broadly than the confines of this lesson. Finally, here is the teacher’s copy of the worksheet to make delivering this lesson a bit easier.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Write It Right: Would-Be

“Would-be. ‘The would-be assassin was arrested.’ The word doubtless supplies a want, but we can better endure the want than the word. In the instance of the assassin, it is needless, for he who attempts to murder is an assassin, whether he succeeds or not.”

Excerpted from: Bierce, Ambrose. Write it Right: A Little Blacklist of Literary Faults. Mineola, NY: Dover, 2010.

The Weekly Text, April 24, 2020

This week’s Text, in the continuing–but premature–observation of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2020–returns to the subject with which I began the month, to wit, this reading on the internment camps in which American citizens of Asian Pacific descent were held during World War II along with its vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. We Americans think ourselves exceptional, but nationalism, tyranny, and bigotry are anything but exceptional–they are the tedious crap to which we as a species have subscribed for centuries.

That’s something worth remembering as our idiot president uses locutions like “Chinese virus and violence against Americans of Asian descent is on the rise.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, April 17, 2020

First of all, let me reiterate, as I mentioned in the post currently pinned to the top of this blog, April is not Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2020, May is, just as every year in the month of May we observe this themed history month celebrating our neighbors of Asian Pacific descent. I offer in extenuation only the weakest excuse for this lapse at Mark’s Text Terminal: the coronavirus pandemic threw me off, and the attendant social isolation only exacerbated my confusion.

Now, that said, I have been trying to publish at least ten posts a day for the benefit of homebound parents and students. For a few moments this morning, while enjoying the ambience at the laundromat, I considered taking down all the posts I’ve already published on observation of Asian Pacific Heritage Month. The fact is, I need to take a break from the pace I’ve been setting for myself; so, this year, Mark’s Text Terminal celebrates the accomplishments and contributions of Asian Pacific Americans a month early.

For which I apologize. The good news is this: from the home page, you can look at the word cloud in the upper-right-hand margin and click on “Asian Pacific History,” which will take you to several years worth of posts on this subject.

For today, however, Mark’s Text Terminal offers this reading on the influential Japanese artist known simply as Hokusai along with a vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet to accompany it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, April 10, 2020

OK, last but not least this morning, this week’s Text, in this blog’s ongoing observation of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2020, here is a reading on Zen along with its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, March 20, 2020

Alright, I do want to remember that March is Women’s History Month. This week’s Text, in observation of the month, is a reading on flappers along with its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. The reading is short, but it allows for the possibility of asking a critical question about them: were they avatars of female agency, and thus an early paradigm of feminism?

This post on the cartoon character Betty Boop, which I posted almost exactly a year ago, might complement today’s Text, depending on how far you want to go with this. I can tell you that the Betty Boop material has been of relatively high interest to the students I’ve served over the years.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Complete Lesson Plan on the Timelines of World History

I was all but certain that I had previously posted this lesson plan on the timeline of global history, but I can’t find it anywhere on Mark’s Text Terminal. So, here is a context clues worksheet on the noun chronology with which I open this lesson. Here is the reading, which is really a list of significant dates in world history; here also are the questions to answer in worksheet form. Finally, here are is the teacher’s copy of the worksheet, i.e. the answers.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Complete Lesson Plan on the Greek Word Root Biblio-

Here is a complete lesson plan on the Greek word root biblio-, which means, simply, book. I open this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the noun novel as a way of hinting to students where this lesson is going. Finally, here is the worksheet that is the basis of the learning for this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: Of Ghouls and Goblins

Moving right along this morning, here is a lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Of Ghouls and Goblins.” I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concept of the role model. Finally, to execute this lesson, you’ll need the PDF of the illustration and questions and the typescript of the answer key.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.