Category Archives: English Language Arts

Worksheets, short exercises, learning supports, readings and other materials related to the English Language Arts curriculum.

Cultural Literacy: Chauvinism

As I get ready to sign off for the day, I cannot thing of a better or more timely document to depart by than this Cultural Literacy worksheet on chauvinism.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Direct Object

“Direct Object: A noun or pronoun that receives the action of a transitive verb. Pearson publishes books.”

Excerpted from: Strunk, William Jr., and E.B. White. The Elements of Style, Fourth Edition. New York: Longman, 2000.

Word Root Exercise: Poly

Here is a worksheet the Greek word root poly, which you may already know means many. This is a very productive root in English for vocabulary development across the common branch curriculum.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Schizophrenia

It’s a gorgeous August day in southwestern Vermont. Here, if you can use it (I did more than once, for students dealing with schizophrenia in their families), is a reading on schizophrenia along with its vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. The reading is relatively straightforward, nonetheless it contains abstractions (e.g. “delusions of grandeur”) with which some learners may struggle. As with just about everything else at Mark’s Text Terminal, this document is formatted in Microsoft Word, so you can alter it to your student’s needs.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Beholden (adj)

Here’s a context clues worksheet on the adjective beholden because it’s Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day today. It also happens to be a commonly used and sturdy adjective, so I submit–particularly because we live in a period of rising political corruption around the world–that this is a word high school students should know upon graduation.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Nativism

If there is a better time to post this reading on nativism and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet, I can’t imagine when it would be.

And stay tuned, please, for a forthcoming review essay on nationalism in the United States in the nineteenth century which will contain the ingredients for an interdisciplinary unit on that subject–and, of course, the concept of nationalism and ethnic chauvinism.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Ally (n), Ally (vi/vt)

Today’s Word of the Day from Merriam-Webster is “grubstake,” which I figured I could pass on. However, you might find that this context clues worksheet on ally as a noun and this one on the word as a verb–used, as above, both intransitively and transitively.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Dependent Clause

“Dependent Clause: A group of words that includes a subject and verb but is subordinate to and independent clause in a sentence. Dependent clauses begin with either a subordinating conjunction, such as if, because, since, or a relative pronoun, such as who, which, that. When it gets dark, we’ll find a restaurant that has music.”

Excerpted from: Strunk, William Jr., and E.B. White. The Elements of Style, Fourth Edition. New York: Longman, 2000.

The Order of Things: Evolution

Here’s another lesson plan from Barbara Ann Kipfer’s book The Order of Things, this one on the scale and chronology of evolution. You’ll need this list and comprehension questions worksheet to complete this lesson in your classroom.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Howard Hughes

Somehow, about six years ago, a struggling student I served improbably found her way to the late Jonathan Demme’s early and critically acclaimed film “Melvin and Howard.” The film is a fictionalized account of Melvin Dummar’s account of encountering Hughes in the Utah desert and giving him a ride to Las Vegas. You can click through on the links to read more about this implausible story.

Anyway, my students, an inquisitive young woman, wanted to know more about Howard Hughes. I worked up this reading on Howard Hughes and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet to supply her with some context for understanding the story in “Melvin and Howard.” Incidentally, I watched the movie myself and didn’t care much for it. Having since seen several of his films, I learned that Jonathan Demme just wasn’t my kind of filmmaker, though I did think his rendition of “The Silence of the Lambs” was the best of the various productions around the legend of brilliant serial killer, cannibal, and psychiatrist Hannibal Lecter.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.