Category Archives: English Language Arts

Worksheets, short exercises, learning supports, readings and other materials related to the English Language Arts curriculum.

Currency (n)

Because I work in an economics-and-finance-themed high school, I found it necessary to write this context clues worksheet on the noun currency. Perhaps it will have some utility in your classroom.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Grapheme (n)

A minimal unit of grammar into which a sentence or a word within a sentence can be divided. E.g. Come inside can be divided into the minimal units come, in, and side; distasteful into dis, taste, and ful.”

Excerpted from: Matthews, P.H. The Oxford Concise Dictionary of Linguistics. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

Cusp (n)

Here is a context clues worksheet on the noun cusp that might be of use in you classroom. It’s a solid abstract noun that has a foot in the concrete world, which may make it suitable for teaching the difference between concrete and abstract nouns.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Rotten Rejections: The Dragon of Wantley

[This refers to the novel by Owen Wister, which is available as a free e-book from Project Gutenberg.]

“A burlesque and grotesque piece of nonsense…it is mere fooling and does not have the bite and lasting quality of satire.”

Excerpted from: Bernard, Andre, and Bill Henderson, eds. Pushcart’s Complete Rotten Reviews and Rejections. Wainscott, NY: Pushcart Press, 1998.

Cultural Literacy: Alexandria

If you teach world history or global studies (or whatever your school, district or state calls this subject), you might find this Cultural Literacy worksheet on Alexandria useful.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Marshall (n) and Marshal (vt/vi)

Here are five worksheets on the homophones marshall and marshal used, respectively, as a noun and a verb. The verb, particularly, strikes me as something high school students should know, particularly if teachers are assigning research papers and asking students to marshal evidence to support arguments.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Anachronism (n)

“A term used to distinguish anything out of its proper time. Shakespeare’s references to cannons in King John, a play which takes place before cannons came into use, to clocks in Julius Caesar, and to billiards in Antony and Cleopatra, are examples of anachronisms. In literature, anachronisms are sometimes used deliberately as comic devices to emphasized universal timelessness.”

Excerpted from: Murphy, Bruce, ed. Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia, Fourth Edition. New York: Harper Collins, 1996.