Tag Archives: word roots

Word Root Exercise: Gen/o, Gene, and Genesis

Here’s a worksheet on the Greek word roots gen/o, gene, and genesis. They mean–get ready for a list–production, formation, generation, origin, cause, birth, kind, and race.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Dys

Given the current state of human civilization, this worksheet on the Greek root dys ought to be useful. It means, of course, baddifficultabnormal, and impaired.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

 

Word Root Exercise: Dyn, Dyna, Dynam/o

Here, on a rainy Thursday morning, is a worksheet on the Greek word roots dyn, dyna, and dynam/o. They mean power, energy, and strength. These are, as the worksheet shows, some very productive roots in English. A number of STEM-related words start with this root, among others.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Rupt

If there is a better time, for obvious reasons, to post this worksheet on the Latin word root rupt, I can’t imagine it. It means “to break, burst,” and is at the basis of the English adjective, very much in the news of late, corrupt.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Matr, Matri, Mater

Ok, it’s a long story, but a prompt from the AFT’s Share My Lesson Plan website made me aware that I had not, despite my best intentions, ever published this worksheet on the Latin word roots matr, matri, and mater. They mean, you have probably already inferred, mother.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

 

Word Root Exercise: Dox

It’s a pretty Saturday morning in the early summer. Next week is the final week of classes in my current posting–and then I leave, and never will I be happier, I expect, than to leave my current job.

Here is a worksheet on the Greek word root dox. It means belief and praise, so the word orthodox suddenly makes a lot more sense, as do the other words on this relatively short exercise.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Chron/o

Here is a worksheet on the Greek word root chron/o. It means, as you probably already know–but your students may not know–time. It’s an extremely productive root in English; as this worksheet shows, chron/o is at the base of a number of words that educated people know and routinely use.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.