Tag Archives: word roots

Word Root Exercise: Cred

Jeez, I hate to keep saying the same thing over and over, but now seems like just about the perfect time to post this worksheet on the Latin word root cred. It means belief and believe.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Homo, Homoio, Homeo

Because this worksheet on the greek word roots homo, homoio, and homeo contained errors I finally got around to fixing this morning, I’ll put it up here. It’s a complicated but very productive root meaning same, similar, and equal.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, January 4, 2019

The first Text for the New Year is this complete lesson plan on the latin word root bell-. It means war. Here is the context clues worksheet on the noun conflict with which I begin this lesson. Finally, this vocabulary-building worksheet on this root is the mainstay of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Hydro-

You might find that this worksheet on the Greek word root hydr/o–it means, unsurprisingly, water, but also hydrogen and liquid–helps students quickly build a lexicon of key vocabulary words.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Kine, Kinet, Kinemat

Ok, it’s pouring rain on a Friday morning in late December, and it’s forty-two degrees at 4:49 in the morning.

Here is a worksheet on the Greek roots kine, kinet, and kinemat. They mean motion and division (think kinetic).

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Anthropomorphism

In my classroom, we recently completed a vocabulary building exercise using the Greek word roots anthro– and anthropo- as a starting point. Here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on anthropomorphism to deepen understanding of this particular concept if anyone is interested.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Cent

This worksheet n the Latin word root cent will help students learn and apply some key words in English, I think. It means, your students will quickly infer (I hope) hundred.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.