Tag Archives: word roots

A Complete Lesson Plan on the Greek Word Root Anthrop/o

Rain continues to fall in New York City, a manifestation of Hurricane Florence, which is about to put a beatdown on the Carolinas. I’m glad to be in my dry apartment working on posting this complete lesson on the Greek word root anthrop/o, which means man and human. I start this lesson with this context clues worksheet for the noun humanity to provide a basis for the heuristic work this scaffolded worksheet with an independent practice assignment requires of students. The context clues worksheets can serve as the prior knowledge students will need to help them understand the meaning of this Greek word root.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Omni

OK, it’s a Sunday morning and I’m preparing to send out a clutch of resumes for some positions that might be appropriate for me. On my coffee break at the moment, let me post this worksheet on the Latin word root omni. It means all.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Medi-

Here is a worksheet on the Latin word root medi if you can use it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Master List of Latin Cognates

Over the years, I’ve worked steadily at engineering a vocabulary building curriculum that uses Greek and Latin word roots to help students develop the active academic lexicons they need to succeed in school. Early on, because I work with so many Spanish-speaking students, I started to work up cognate lists of words that were similar or even identical across the Romance Languages.

One of the results of that effort is this master list of Romance Language cognates. Over the summer I copied and pasted all these lists into the word root worksheets that proceed from a given root.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Derma, Derm, and Dermat/o

It probably won’t take your students long, using this worksheet on the Greek word roots derma, derm, and dermat/o, to figure out that those roots mean skin. That’s why the doctor who deals with the organ of skin is called a dermatologist.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Dem/o, Demi

The second post immediately below this one is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on pandemics. In that post I mention that one can discern the Greek word root dem within that noun, and that dem–or, as in the case of this Greek word root worksheet, dem/o and demi–means people. That said, I must make note of, and offer caution on account of, the fact that in Latin the root demi means half or less than. Now you know why espresso is served in a demitasse.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Pandemic

Teachers working in social studies or science may find this Cultural Literacy worksheet on pandemics useful. For a literacy connection, nota bene the Greek root dem in this word; it means people, and shows up in other words like democracy and demography, both words related to people. If you look at the post two above this one, you’ll in fact find a word root worksheet on that Greek word root.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.