Tag Archives: word roots

Word Root Exercise: Phyll/o

OK, closing out the afternoon and the first semester of this school year, here is a worksheet on the Greek root phyll/o. It means leaf, and is very productive, particularly in the sciences, in the English language.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Physi/o

Alrighty, then: here is a worksheet on the Greek root physi/o, which means both nature and physical. This root is, needless to say, very productive in English, especially in the sciences.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Quin, Quint, Quintu, Quinque

Here is a worksheet on the Latin roots quin, quint, quintu, and quinque. You probably already recognize the meaning of these roots as five and fifth. This root is very productive in English and probably quintessential to student vocabulary building.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on the Greek Word Root Auto

If you scroll down to the seventh post below this one, you will find a pair of context clues worksheets on the noun autobiography and the adjective autobiographical.

I thought perhaps this lesson plan on the Greek word root auto–it means self and same–might be complement those worksheets, or vice versa. I open this lesson, hinting at the meaning of the root, with this context clues worksheet on the adjective identical. Finally, here is the word root worksheet that is the mainstay of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Phor, Phore

It turns out to be a complicated piece of language, but here, nonetheless, is a worksheet on the Greek roots phor and phore. These mean, variously, to bear, to produce, to carry, and state. As you’ll see from the English words that grow from this root, it basically divides its labors between the concrete and the abstract in language.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Radic, Radix

If you can use it, here is a worksheet on the Latin roots radic and radix. They mean root.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Phobia

Even though I’ve posted it elsewhere on this website, I’ve not put it up as a standalone document, so here is a worksheet on the Greek root phobia. It means, of course, fear. This root is amazingly productive in the English language, which suggests that there is a very well-endowed fund of anxiety in the Western world.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.