Tag Archives: word roots

Word Root Exercise: Vor

Here is a worksheet on the Latin word root vor, which means to eat. You’ll find this productive root, unsurprisingly, at the base of words like carnivore, herbivore, and insectivore and voracious (all included in this document) as well as omnivore, not included here but a nice example of a pair of Latin roots–omni means all–combining to give us a useful word–someone or something that eats everything.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Prot, Proto

Moving right along on a cool and cloudy Thursday morning in Brooklyn, here is a worksheet on the Greek word roots prot– and proto. It means primitive and first, which helps me understand how we end up, in English, with prototype. Protagonist, however, mystifies me a bit; I suppose because the protagonist is the primary (i.e. first) actor in a situation, the word sensibly springs from prot.

Anyway, this document includes several other words that spring from this productive root, including such scientific words as protoplast, protozoan, proton, and protozoology.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Vers, Vert

OK, if you can use it, here is a worksheet on the Latin word roots vers and vert. They mean turn. So you probably won’t be surprised to hear that these roots turn up in commonly used English words such as adverse, divert, extrovert, and revert, since all involve a turning of some sort. I think a nifty assessment for this worksheet would be to ask students if they can think of any words that spring from this root–e.g. reverse, obverse, subvert, etc–that are not included in the worksheet.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Tetra-

Phew. I am on track to publish 30 blog posts this morning. So, to reach that number, here is a worksheet on the Greek word root tetra. It means four. You’ll find this root at the base of words (all present in this document) such as tetragon, tetrahedron, tetrapod, and tetravalent. If you’re teaching math or science or both, this worksheet might be useful (but it might not–those aren’t my subjects, alas).

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Verb

Moving right along this morning, here is a worksheet on the Latin word root verb. As you probably infer, this root simply means word. You’ll find this root at the base of just about any word in English related to language, for example (and all on this worksheet), adverb, proverb, verbalize, and verbatim.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Tele, Tel, Telo

Here is a on the Greek word roots tele, tel, and telo. They mean distant, end, and complete. You’ll find this root, somewhat abstractly, at the basis of words like telegenic, telegraph and telegram (mostly obsolete nouns now, I suppose), and telemetry, all of which are included on this worksheet–which means, if the author of the book from which this work is drawn remains correct, these words are likely to show up on the SAT.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Tri

Moving right along this morning, here is a worksheet on the Latin word root tri. Do I need to tell you that it means three, and is found (as it is in this document) in such high-frequency words in English as triangle, triathlon, and triad?

I didn’t think so.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Tax/o

Here is a worksheet on the Greek word root tax/o. It means, simply, arrangement. So of course you’ll find this root at the base of words like taxonomy and syntax–both included on this document. However, you’ll also find on this document some scientific words, e.g. geotaxis, phyllotaxis, and thermotaxis, that are not exactly part of the vernacular.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Trans

Here is a worksheet on the Latin word root trans. It means, variously, across, through, change, and beyond. You recognize it, I am confident, as the root of such words–all included on this document–as transact, transcribe, transfer, and transit. And of course you’ll find it in all kinds oc commonly used English words like transport and transcend, both of which indicates one of this roots connotations: not just across, but to move across.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Syn-, Sym-, Syl-, Sys-

Alright, here is a worksheet on the Greek word roots syn-,sym-,syl-, and sys-. They mean, simply, together and same. These are fertile roots in English, and they give us words like symbiosis, symmetry, synchronize, synergy, and synthesis. All of those words are included in this document. Other common words growing from this root, such as synonym, are not here–but as students learn roots, they will recognize syn means together and same, and will be most of the way to defining the word.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.