Tag Archives: word roots

Word Root Exercise: Gyn/o, Gyne, and Gynec/o

OK, let’s begin the week with this worksheet on the Greek roots gyn/o, gyne, and gynec/o. If you know the words gynecologist (or perhaps an even more timely word, misogynist), then you know that these roots mean “woman” and “female.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Uni-

This worksheet on the Latin word root uni might serve students well, particularly English language learners. It means, of course, one.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Hem/o, Hemat/o, Hema, -emia, -aemia

Health teachers, nursing students, and others pursuing careers in the medical professions might find this worksheet on the Greek roots hemo, hemato, hema, emia, and aemia useful; they mean blood and blood condition.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Mega, Megal/o, Megaly

Here is a worksheet on the Greek word roots mega, megal/o, and megaly. They mean large, great, and million.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Nom, Nomin, Nomen, Onomas and Onomat

Here is a worksheet on the Latin roots nom, nomin, nomen, onomas, and onomat. These are very productive roots in English; they mean name and noun.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Meter, Metr, and Metry

Here is a vocabulary-building worksheet on the Greek roots meter,metr, and -metry.  They mean measure, to measure, and science of measuring.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Phil/o, Phile

It’s an extremely productive root in English, so this worksheet on the Greek word roots phil/o and phile might benefit students across a fairly wide band of ability and understanding to build their vocabularies. They mean love, attracted to, affinity for, and a natural liking.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.