Tag Archives: word roots

Word Root Exercise: Ornith/o

Last but not least, today, here is a short worksheet on the Greek word root ornith/o, which means, of course, bird. If you’ve downloaded other word-root worksheets from Mark’s Text Terminal, please be advised that this one is a much shorter exercise. Its purpose is as a do-now exercise, something short to start off a class period.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Hexa, Hex

This worksheet on the Greek roots hexa– and hex builds students’ English vocabulary with words based on these two roots, which means six. Needless to say, these two roots are very productive in English, especially producing words used in science and mathematics education.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, August 21, 2020

This week’s Text is a lesson plan on the Latin word roots man, mani and manu, all three of which mean hand. Even a cursory glance at these three words divulge their productivity in the English language: manicure, manufacture, and manual all come immediately to mind.

I open this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the noun digit in its meaning as “any of the divisions in which the limbs of most vertebrates terminate, which are typically five in number but may be reduced (as in the horse), and which typically have a series of phalanges bearing a nail, claw, or hoof at the tip — compare FINGER 1, TOE.” I wanted this do-now exercise to hint for students what the word roots in this lesson might mean.

And, at last, here is the worksheet that is the primary work of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Carn, Carni

Here is a worksheet on the Latin word roots carn and carni. They mean flesh and meat, which you already knew if you’ve ever eaten chili con carne, carnitas tacos, taught or were taught a biology lesson about carnivores, explained to students that reincarnation is a belief common to both Hinduism and Buddhism, or thought about the consequences of war as carnage.

Just sayin’.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Pro-

Alright, here is a worksheet on the Greek word root pro, which means before, forward, forth, in place of, and in addition to. This root is so productive in English–as this worksheet shows in summary–that I hardly need mention it. Interestingly, in Russia, this root shows up as a preposition meaning “about.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Arbor

Here’s a worksheet on the Latin word root arbor, which as you probably know means tree. This is a relatively productive root in English, though its words tend to be somewhat specialized. Nonetheless, word roots are one way to build vocabulary very quickly if that’s what you need to do.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Vivacious (adj)

Because it’s Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day today, here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective vivacious. Despite its solid Latin root–viv, meaning live–I still think of this as something of a tinsel word. Whether or not it’s a word students need to know, well that’s up to you, esteemed teacher.

At the same time, maybe this word root exercise on the Latin roots viv, vivi, and vit, (respectively, live, living, and life) might be a little more productive in vocabulary building. In any case vivacious in in that worksheet as well, with, arguably, richer context.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Poly

Here is a worksheet the Greek word root poly, which you may already know means many. This is a very productive root in English for vocabulary development across the common branch curriculum.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Dic, Dict

Here is a worksheet on the Latin roots dic and dict. They mean speech, to speak, and to proclaim (declare officially). This is a very productive root in English, and if you take this worksheet, you’ll quickly perceive, I submit, that these are mostly words that high school graduates really ought to know.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Pod, -Pode

OK, esteemed colleagues, here is a worksheet on the Greek word roots pod and pode. They mean foot and feet. These are a couple of very productive roots in English, and sometimes morph into pede–e.g. centipede.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.