Tag Archives: argumentation

Crime and Puzzlement: The Peek-a-Boo Girl

Because I’ve been in the folder preparing some of them for a new job I am about to start, I’ll post this lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “The Peek-a-Boo Girl.” I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Harlem Renaissance. This scan of the illustration and questions drives the lesson. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, January 17, 2020

Mark’s Text Terminal is undergoing a cleaning of its digital storage locker. A couple of weeks ago I posted a trove of materials for teaching Chinua Achebe’s masterpiece Things Fall Apart; two weeks hence, I’ll post another cache of documents for teaching William Golding’s Hobbesian nightmare, Lord of the Flies.

This week’s Text is an assortment of documents I wrote between ten and twelve years ago for teaching Elie Wiesel’s Holocaust memoir, Night. I’ve not used these materials in ten years, so I am moving them off my hard drive and onto Mark’s Text Terminal for storage–and to offer them to others for their use.

I’ll start by uploading this reading on Night (from the Intellectual Devotional series) and its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. I’ve definitely posted these documents elsewhere on this website; since they are in this unit’s folder, I’ll include them here because it makes sense to do so.

As I write this post, I realize that when I walked into a new job at the High School of Economics & Finance in Lower Manhattan in the fall of 2008 (exciting times at that moment in the Financial District, as the world economy was about to fall off a cliff on account of worthless mortgage securities peddled fraudulently–and you who did this know who you are), I came into a situation in which my co-teacher, whom I’d not met, was out, and I needed to get some materials together right away to keep busy those young people whose education I was charged with delivering. For that reason, my first move was to write this prelude for group work to furnish kids with some context for understanding the Holocaust, and therefore for understanding Night.

Somewhere in this process I wrote this unit plan, which looks incomplete to me. I also wrote these eight lesson plans, only the first three of which, I regret, are complete. Still, the other five are solid templates, and wouldn’t be hard to finish.

Here are eight context clues worksheets, one for each chapter of Night, along with their eight sets of definitions for your class linguist.

Finally, here are the eight comprehension worksheets I used to guide the reading of the book.

Every document attached to this post is in Microsoft Word, so they are at the disposal of you and your students.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: Stradegy

One way to introduce students to Antonio Stradivari and his prized musical instruments would be by way of this lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Stradegy.” I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the idiom “Hit Below the Belt.” Here is the PDF of the illustration and questions that drive the investigation. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: Bang, Bang!

OK, it’s good to be back at work. Here is a complete lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Bang, Bang!” This Cultural Literacy worksheet on the idiom “Let Them Eat Cake” opens this lesson. This PDF of illustration, reading and questions, scanned directly from the Crime and Puzzlement book, drives the lesson. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key to solve this heinous crime.   

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Assessing Arguments

As I near the end of 2019, I’m developing new materials (e.g. look here, in 2020, for new social studies materials based in Judith C. Hochman and Natalie Wexler’s The Writing Revolution method of instructional design, as well as a new type of vocabulary-building worksheet derived from the Common Core Standard on resolving issues in English usage) while cleaning out some aging folders in my toolbox for this blog.

A couple of days ago I discovered this lesson plan on argumentation that I intended as an assessment of students’ ability to assess arguments and use that assessment either to strengthen the argument or to develop a counterargument. I intended to begin this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the noun treatise. Finally, here is the worksheet at the center of this unit.

If you have used other of the lessons on argumentation I’ve posted over time, then you have some prior knowledge of this unit. I wrote the unit, and I think this lesson has a curiously unfinished quality about it. At some point, I will have an opportunity to review and bring great cohesion to the unit as a whole and to this lesson in particular. So, this material may show up here again in a more-developed form.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: Wedding Day

This lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Wedding Day” is the finale of the first of three units I wrote to accompany this material; believe it or not, I have 48 more of these lessons to post. To teach this lesson, I generally start, after the meshugaas of a class change, with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the American idiom “Get Someone’s Goat.” You’ll need this PDF of the illustration and narrative of the case of the “Wedding Day” to guide students through it. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key that solves the case.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: An 8-Cent Story

It’s the penultimate instructional period of the work week, and I am preparing next week’s materials and cleaning out some folders on the desktop of my computer. And as long as I’ve used the word once, I can use it again by saying that this lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “An 8-Cent Story” is the penultimate lesson in the first of the three Crime and Puzzlement units I wrote a couple of years ago.

This lesson opens with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the American idiom “Curiosity Killed the Cat.” Here is the PDF of the reading and questions that drive the lesson; finally, here is the typescript of the answer key.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.