Tag Archives: argumentation

The Weekly Text, July 31, 2020

This week’s Text is a lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Watch Out!” I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on Shakespeare’s famous line, from The Merchant of Venice, that “The quality of mercy is not strain’d.”

To conduct your investigation, you’ll need the PDF of the illustration and questions that constitute the evidence of the crime. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key so that you can solve the case.

That’s it. Stay cool, stay safe, have a nice weekend!

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Aesop’s Fables: The Boy Bathing

On a ninety-degree day in Vermont, here, appropriately, is a lesson plan on the Aesop’s fable “The Boy Bathing.” You’ll need this reading and inquiry questions for students to conduct the lesson. You’ll notice, as you will in all of these lessons I’ve posted on Aesop’s fables, that there is plenty of room to expand the range and nature of the questions on the worksheet. That’s by design. Aesop’s fables are miniature lessons in philosophy, and the kinds of questions they arouse can be improvised based on student perception, interest, and need.

Incidentally, this is the last of these I have to post at the moment. I could write more relatively easily. Are you using them? If so, leave a comment, and I’ll put writing a few more on my to-do list.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Order of Things: Longest Rivers

Here is another lesson from The Order of Things, this one on the longest rivers in the world. You’ll also need the list and comprehension questions that are the work of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: At the Fair

This lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “At the Fair” is the last one in the second unit I wrote for this material; I have a third unit of twenty-four lessons, so if you like these and use them, I’ll be posting most if not all of those in the next three or so months.

I open this lesson after a class change with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the literary genre of the epic. You’ll need the PDF of the illustration and questions to investigate what did happen at the fair. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key to help you and your students will need to solve this heinous crime and arrest a suspect for its commission.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Aesop’s Fable: The Farmer and the Fortune

OK, here is a lesson plan Aesop’s fable “The Farmer and the Fortune.” Of course, you’ll need the reading and inquiry questions that constitute the work of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: Foxy Grandpa

I notice I haven’t posted one in some time, so here is a lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Foxy Grandpa.”

To open this lesson and get students settled after a class change, I used this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concept of the taboo. To conduct your investigation of the Foxy Grandpa, you will need this scan of the illustration and questions that drive the case. Finally, to get to the bottom of this crime and bring the offenders to justice, here is the typescript of the answer key.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Learning Support on Note Cards for Research and a Structured Note-Card Blank

Over the years I’ve been assigned to “co-teach” many classes; in New York City, I was a regular fixture in social studies classrooms in which I was charged with supporting struggling learners. In the last school I worked in in the Five Boroughs, I worked with three different teachers with three different approaches to the curriculum. Because the assistant principal in charge of the humanities regularly changed the form and content of the curriculum, my duties required me, as a colleague once put it so cogently, to constantly “reinvent the wheel.”

One of the most contentious, and therefore most subject to change, was the synthetic research paper. One of the teachers I worked with assigned students the task of writing, and turning in for assessment, a set of 3 x 5 cards with sources and notes that would eventually end up in students’ papers. For that reason, I contrived this learning support with examples of note cards for research along with this structured note-card blank to aid struggling learners with this task.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: The Night of the Crabs

Here is a lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “The Night of the Crabs.” I planned to open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concept of survivor’s guilt. You’ll need the PDF of the illustration and questions to investigate this crime. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key to close the case and bring a culprit to justice.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Research Topics Explained: A Learning Support

Here is a learning support on topics for research that I wrote to support students in a college writing course I co-taught several years ago. I’m all but certain I’ve posted this elsewhere, probably in combination with some other materials on synthetic research papers. Here it is as a stand-alone post.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: Over the Cliffs and Down We Go

OK, moving right along on this grey, damp morning in southwestern Vermont, here is a lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Over the Cliffs and Down We Go.” I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the idiom, derived from a longer proverb, “For Want of a Nail.” You’ll need this PDF of the illustration and questions that constitute the evidence of this case to conduct your investigation. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key so that you can complete the investigation and bring the suspect to justice.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.