Tag Archives: science literacy

Word Root Exercise: Phyll/o

OK, closing out the afternoon and the first semester of this school year, here is a worksheet on the Greek root phyll/o. It means leaf, and is very productive, particularly in the sciences, in the English language.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Thomas Edison

Moving right along on my lunch break, here is a short reading on Thomas Edison and its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet if you can use them.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Acid Rain

You don’t hear much about it anymore–perhaps because we have much bigger, more threatening environmental catastrophes on our civilizational plate–but if you can use it, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on acid rain.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Agassiz on Evolution

 “The eye of the trilobite tells us that the sun shone on the beach where he lived; for there is nothing in nature without a purpose, and when so complicated an organ was made to receive the light, there must have been light to enter it.”

Jean Louis Rodolphe Agassiz

Geological Sketches (1866)

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Tycho Brahe

This reading on Tycho Brahe and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet have turned out, to my surprise, to be surprisingly high-interest materials for a certain kind of student I have served over the years. If you can persuade students that Brahe, like Galileo and Johannes Kepler, was in rebellion against the established authorities (church, but also, where they were closely aligned, state as well) of his time, well, what adolescent isn’t interested in acts of rebellion?

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Function as a Science Word

If it looks to you like I’m cleaning house at Mark’s Text Terminal, you’re right, I am. To that end, here is a lesson plan on function as a science word. You might find these definitions of function as as a verb and a noun helpful. Here is the the first worksheet for this lesson, and here is the second.

This work, as I’ve mentioned in the four other posts in which I’ve posted other lessons from this unit, was something I was tasked with producing several years ago to help struggling students build vocabulary in math and science. It was part of a very busy semester; I did not finish writing the final three lessons of this eight-lesson unit (it was for an eight-week, one meeting weekly seminar class), so this is the fifth of five lessons. As I review the material, it’s fairly obvious that I produced it on the fly, then never returned to improve it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Immunity

OK, health and science teachers, maybe this reading on immunity and its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet might find a place in your classroom.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.