Category Archives: Worksheets

The Weekly Text, October 20, 2017

For this week’s Text, Mark’s Text Terminal engages in a rare act of promotion, namely, exposing readers of this blog to the beautiful “My Dream for Animals” website. A colleague of mine in this school is involved in this. The photos are gorgeous, and the avowed mission of the site noble.

To accompany the site, here is a reading on Swedish botanist and taxonomist Carl Linnaeus together with this reading comprehension worksheet to complement it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Emigrate (vi)

A colleague with whom I team-teach a sophomore global studies asked me to develop a context clues worksheet on the noun emigre. It means, of course, emigrant. So instead I wrote this context clues worksheet on the verb emigrate. It’s used intransitively; I plan to teach it, then point out, by way of a simple question (“What do you suppose we call someone who emigrates?”), to students that someone who emigrates is an emigrant. From there it’s a small step to point out that the French word for emigrant is emigre (it is the past participle of the French verb emigrer–“to emigrate”–if you must know).

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Transitive Verb

Here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the transitive verb that I just now used in a lesson on transitive and intransitive verbs. It’s a quick way to introduce the skill of recognising and correctly using these two type of verbs.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, October 13, 2017

Today is the final Friday of National Hispanic Heritage Month. This week, Mark’s Text Terminal offers a reading on the Panama Canal together with this comprehension worksheet to accompany it.

I debated myself at some length about whether or not these materials properly fit with the idea of National Hispanic Heritage month. In the final analysis, I think this short article does a nice job of exposing the kind of imperial meddling Latin Americans have dealt with for centuries.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

 

Bogus (adj.)

Should fate somehow require you to teach a lesson on Bill & Ted, you’ll probably find this context clues worksheet on the adjective bogus useful.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text Redux, Intellectual Devotional: Michelangelo

A reader wrote in this morning asking if I could post this Intellectual Devotional reading on Michelangelo. I typed this into a Word document so that I could edit and differentiate it for a variety of readers; the document’s header reflects the course in which I primarily use it. Since it is a Word document, you may edit it for your purposes as well. Finally, here again is the reading comprehension worksheet to accompany the reading.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, October 6, 2017

For this, the fourth week of National Hispanic Heritage Month, Mark’s Text Terminal offers this Intellectual Devotional reading on Diego Velazquez. Here is a reading comprehension worksheet to accompany it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.