Category Archives: Worksheets

This category designates worksheets for classroom use with students.

Cultural Literacy: The Monroe Doctrine

If you scroll down one post below this one, you’ll find another Cultural Literacy worksheet on Manifest Destiny. To add a corollary to that, here is another Cultural Literacy worksheet, this one on the Monroe Doctrine.

It is this policy, I think, that has led the United States into making common cause with vicious tyrants across Latin America, but particularly General Augusto Pinochet, Rafael Trujillo, three members of the Somoza Family, and the genocidal Guatemalan strongman, Efrain Rios Montt–and calling him genocidal is no exaggeration, reader, as this particular moral cretin was on trial for genocide when he died.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Manifest Destiny

Here, on a rainy Tuesday morning (the remnants of Hurricane Florence pass through the Five Boroughs today), is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Manifest Destiny. You will note that I have posted this during Hispanic Heritage Month 2018, and so tagged it using my coding system. I find that editorial decision requires a mild defense.

Manifest Destiny, narrowly defined, refers to a belief in the United States, among its government and citizens, that the nation was obviously destined (simply another way of saying “Manifest Destiny”) to occupy North America in its entirety. Because this frame of mind informed, like it or not, United States policy across Latin America, it is an frame of inquiry in studying Hispanic History. Ergo, it ends up as a Hispanic Heritage Month post here.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Puerto Rico

Here is a reading on Puerto Rico and a comprehension worksheet to accompany it in observance of Hispanic Heritage Month 2018.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Independent Practice: Mayan Civilization

Here is an independent practice worksheet on Mayan Civilization if you can use it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: The Mexican War

Alright, here is the penultimate post on this Saturday morning, the first day of Hispanic Heritage Month 2018: a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Mexican War.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Independent Practice: The Age of Exploration

Here are two independent practice worksheets on the the Age of Exploration, the historical event that was a catastrophe for indigenous Americans and a bonanza for the Spanish and Portuguese explorers who “discovered” the Americas, and in any case gave birth to the Latin American world.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Reconquista

Here at Mark’s Text Terminal chagrin has arrived with the first day of Hispanic Heritage Month 2018. As I marshall materials for material to post for the month, I find my archives nearly empty. What makes this especially embarrassing is the fact that I work in an inner-city high school with a substantial population of teenagers whose families hail from across the Hispanic world.

So some of the material that I post this month, I’m sorry to say, may in fact be a bit of a stretch in terms of relevance to the letter of Hispanic Heritage Month. This reading on the reconquista and its accompanying comprehension worksheet may indeed epitomize that stretch. In any case, however, I think these are useful documents for any high school global studies course. What do you think?

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.