Category Archives: Worksheets

Classroom documents for student use. Most are structured and scaffolded, and most are pitched at a fundamental level in terms of the questions they ask and the work and understandings they require of students.

Common English Verbs Followed by an Infinitive: Attempt

Reducing the pile one document after another, here is a worksheet on the verb attempt as used with an infinitive. I attempted to design some materials on gerunds and infinitives, but failed in the end.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Quotation Marks

Moving right along this morning, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on quotation marks. This is a half-page worksheet with two comprehension questions and space to write practice sentences. Even in this short reading, the authors and editors manage to explain, simply, with an example, the single/double quotation mark rule in punctuation.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, Friday 27 January 2023: History of Hip-Hop Lesson 8, James Brown Brings the Funk

This week’s Text is the eighth lesson plan of the History of Hip-Hop Unit. I’ve begun this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Civil Rights Movement. This is a full-page document with a paragraph-length reading (seven sentences, to be exact) and six comprehension questions, so depending on your idea of a do-now exercise, this one might exceed proper length. Fortunately, like nearly everything else on Mark’s Text Terminal, this document is formatted in Microsoft Word, so you can edit, adapt, and revise freely.

The main part of this lesson is this reading on James Brown and its accompanying worksheet with seven comprehension questions. Finally, here are the the lyrics to “Say It Loud, I”m Black and I’m Proud,” one of the many great songs James Brown recorded. My version of this lesson includes playing the song.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Comprise (vt)

Its use is complicated, so it is often misused, but here, nonetheless, is a context clues worksheet on the transitive verb comprise. It means “to include especially within a particular scope,” “to be made up of,” “compose,” and “constitute.” All of this said, before teaching this word, you might be well served to review usage rules for it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Roman Numerals

Here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Roman numerals. This is a half-page worksheet with a reading–which is relatively complicated due to its carrying examples of Roman numerals themselves–of five sentences and three comprehension questions. As I look at it, I begin to suspect that this is too much complex material to cram into half of a page.

But what do you think? This is a Microsoft Word document, so you can alter it to your students’ needs.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, Friday 20 January 2023: History of Hip-Hop Lesson 7, Muddy Waters Invents Electricity: The Electric Blues after World War II

Here is the seventh lesson plan of the History of Hip-Hop. I begin this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on de facto segregation.

The mainstay of this lesson is this reading on Muddy Waters and its accompanying comprehension questions worksheet and organizer. As this lesson involves listening to some of Muddy Waters’ music, here is a document with the lyrics for two songs: the first is “I’m a Man,” a blues chestnut and proto-civil rights anthem, which Muddy apparently co-wrote with Elias McDaniel, aka Bo Diddley; the second is “Who Do You Love?”, one of Bo Diddley’s hits and one of the baddest, in my not even remotely humble opinion, rock-and-roll songs ever written or recorded (and it has been covered extensively). Finally, here is a worksheet with analytical questions for these lyrics.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Common English Verbs Followed by an Infinitive: Arrange

Here is a worksheet on the verb arrange as it is used with an infinitive. I arranged to eschew henceforth dicey instructional material.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Personal Pronoun

This Cultural Literacy worksheet on the personal pronoun joins a plethora of material on its subject on this blog. Editorially, I would just like to note that antecedent-pronoun agreement is still one of those points of grammar that directly aids clear communication in both speech and prose.

In any event, this is a full-page worksheet with a two-sentence reading and four comprehension questions. The reading itself includes a list of the personal pronouns and their respective cases; the comprehension questions call upon students to write sentences employing personal pronouns extemporaneously. This is, like just about everything else on this blog, a Word document that you may revise to suit your classroom’s needs.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, Friday 13 January 2023: History of Hip-Hop Lesson 6, Woody Guthrie, American Troubadour

This week’s Text is lesson plan six of the History of Hip-Hop Unit. I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on Marian Anderson.

For the first part of this lesson, you’ll need this reading on Woody Guthrie with its attendant comprehension worksheet. For the second part, you’ll need the lyrics to “Pretty Boy Floyd,” one of Woody’s most famous songs, and this research organizer for short work on Pretty Boy Floyd which students use, along with some basic research on the internet, to understand the song and its origins.

Incidentally, and to my considerable surprise, the students to whom I have delivered this lesson were quite interested in the song, if not Woody Guthrie himself. For that reason, I have designated and so tagged this post as containing high-interest materials.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Compel (vt)

Here is a context clues on the transitive verb compel. It means “to drive or urge forcefully or irresistibly” and “to cause to do or occur by overwhelming pressure.” This is commonly used word in English because it is useful. Enough said.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.