Category Archives: Worksheets

This category designates worksheets for classroom use with students.

Cultural Literacy: Rembrandt

A couple of days ago, on June 15th, Rembrandt’s birthday passed while I was away from my computer. Since the day gave me an opportunity to post this Cultural Literacy worksheet on Rembrandt, I observe it now both retrospectively and retroactively.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Neo-

Today is July 17, 2018. One hundred years ago on this date, the Russian royal family was executed in Yekaterinburg, east of the Ural Mountains, thus ending the three-hundred-year Romanov Dynasty. An enduring myth–and the stuff of much popular culture–arising from this event was the purported survival of Grand Duchess Anastasia. However appealing that idea is, it has no basis in fact. Today is National Wrong Way Corrigan Day, celebrating the wrong turn, so to speak, of Douglas Groce Corrigan’s cross-country flight to Los Angeles in 1938. Twenty-eight hours after leaving Brooklyn’s Floyd Bennett Field to fly west, he landed in Dublin, Ireland. In the annals of incompetence, on this day in 1981, a walkway at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Kansas City collapsed, killing 114 people. In 1986, the two geniuses who signed off on the walkway’s design were found culpable in this disaster and relieved of their licenses to practice.

Here is a worksheet on the Greek word root neo-, which means “new” and “recent.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Pope (n) and Papal (adj)

Here, hot off the press, are two context clues worksheets on the noun Pope and the adjective papal.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Internet

Here is a reading on the birth and growth of the Internet with a comprehension worksheet to accompany it. For the right student, I suspect, this will be some relatively high interest material.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Excommunicate (vt)

Today is July 16, On this day in 1945, in the desert of New Mexico at Alamogordo, the United States tested the world’s first atomic bomb, an event known as Trinity. In 1994 on this day, the first fragment of the Shoemaker-Levy comet hit the planet Jupiter. Today is the birthday of African-American journalist and anti-lynching activist Ida B. Wells; she was born in 1862.

Here is a context clues worksheet on the verb excommunicate. It has taken me no small amount of time and cognition to render this word accessible to struggling learners. I remain unconvinced that I’ve done an adequate job of it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, July 13, 2018

It’s Friday the 13th! On this day in 1787, by an act of the Congress of the Confederation, the Northwest Ordinance became law. Also on this day in 1930, soccer’s first World Cup matches were played. In 1985 on this day, the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Live_AidLive Aid concerts for Ethiopian Famine relief were held in London and Philadelphia. It’s the birthday of Jean-Luc Picard; British actor Sir Patrick Stewart is, amazingly, 78 years old today.

This week’s Text is a lesson plan, one of many, that I worked up to use with Lawrence Treat’s series of kid’s books, Crime and Puzzlement. I came across these materials in two books last year, to wit George Hillocks Jr.’s  otherwise unremarkable Teaching Argument Writing Grades 6-12: Supporting Claims with Relevant Evidence and Clear Reasoning (Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2017), but also in two separate papers contained in Keith J. Holyoak and Robert G. Morrison’s (eds.) The Cambridge Handbook of Thinking and Reasoning (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005). All three of these texts extolled the Crime and Puzzlement books as exemplary instructional material for teaching students to assess, analyze, and synthesize evidence in support of an argument and contention.

I ordered the first volume, broke it up and scanned texts for several of the “cases,” and tried them out in my classroom. My freshman English students jumped right into these, and clearly enjoyed them. So I knew I had to build a unit to rationalize the use of this material in my classroom.

Now, about four months later, that unit is nearing completion, and I have 72 lessons in the unit. This week’s Text offers you the first lesson plan in the Crime and Puzzlement Unit Plan. To teach this lesson, you’ll need this worksheet on the case entitled Boudoir. To “solve” the “case,” you’ll need the answer key. Depending on how you begin your class period and its duration, you may want to start the lesson with a do-now exercise, which for this lesson is this Cultural Literacy worksheet on Marie Antoinette’s probably apocryphal statement “Let them eat cake.”

Unfortunately, the Crime and Puzzlement books (there are three in total) appear to remain in copyright, so I don’t think I can ethically or legally post many of these lesson plans. If you choose to contrive your own material based on these books, I can post the unit plan (it’s not quite ready as of this writing) for you; it will contain the standards met, a lengthy, discursive justification for using these methods and materials, and other supporting documentation.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Explicate (vt)

Today is July 12. On this day in 1895, Buckminster Fuller was born. It’s also the birthday of Henry David Thoreau, who was born in 1817. In Northern Ireland, today is Orangemen’s Day, which is apparently also known as “The Twelfth.”

Here is a context clues worksheet on the transitive verb explicate, which probably possesses some utility for some classroom setting.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.