Monthly Archives: September 2018

Enrique Rodriguez Larreta

(1875-1961) Argentine novelist. Larreta was a romantic who wrote with great technical precision. He recreated the Spain of Philip II in La Gloria de don Ramiro (1908; tr The Glory of Don Ramiro, 1924). His dark and lyrical stories are remarkable for images which assault the reader’s senses with colors, sounds, and smells. Other well-known works are two gaucho novels, Zogoibi (1926) and En la pampas (1955), and El Gerardo (1956), a two-part novel set in the Alhambra and Argentina, respectively, shortly after the Spanish civil war.”

Excerpted from: Murphy, Bruce, ed. Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia, Fourth Edition. New York: Harper Collins, 1996.

The Mexican War

It’s pouring rain in The Bronx. Here is a reading on the Mexican War with a comprehension worksheet to attend it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Unamuno on Life and Faith

“Life is doubt,

And faith without doubt is nothing but death.”

Miguel de Umanuno

“Salmo II” (1907)

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Cultural Literacy: Spanish Civil War

Because I seek a teaching license in Massachusetts, I had to start my home computer this afternoon to get out an email to the licensing office up there. As long as I’m sitting here, I might as well post this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Spanish-American War.

Now it’s time to eat spinach burek from Dukagjini. Yum!

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

La Victoria de Junin: Canto a Bolivar

“(1825) An ode by Jose Joaquin Olmedo (1780-1847), Ecuadorian poet and statesman. Dedicated to Simon Bolivar, the poem was inspired by the patriots’ victories at Junin and Ayacucho, which virtually terminated the South American struggle for independence. In form and structure, the work reveals Olmedo’s familiarity with the classics, and the opening lines closely imitate one of the odes of Horace. However, Olmedo’s exuberance, imagination, and extravagant metaphors, which Bolivar himself satirized, make the poem one of the forerunners of the romantic movement in Latin America.”

Excerpted from: Murphy, Bruce, ed. Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia, Fourth Edition. New York: Harper Collins, 1996.

Cultural Literacy: The Spanish Armada

While I do understand that this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Spanish Armada stretches, both in letter and spirit, the bounds of Hispanic Heritage Month, I confess its inclusion here reflects a well that I will very soon run dry. In any case, it is certainly a document that could find a place in a global studies class–here in New York it would be a freshman class.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

“In a village of La Mancha…

the name of which I won’t try to recall, there lived, not long ago, one of those gentlemen, who usually keep a lance upon a rack, an old shield, a lean horse, and a greyhound for coursing.”

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

Don Quixote pt I ch. I (1605)

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.