Category Archives: Worksheets

This category designates worksheets for classroom use with students.

Independent Practice: The Black Death

As far as I’m concerned, spring break begins as soon as a publish a few more blog posts this afternoon. You’ll hear not a peep from me next week–I hope you will be, as I will, enjoying the spring weather.

Here is a short independent practice worksheet on the black death. I’ve formatted it to fit on one page of paper, but depending on your students, you may want to spread it our over two pages. Like almost everything on Mark’s Text Terminal, this is a Microsoft Word document, so you can manipulate it to suit your students’ needs.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, April 12, 2019

In this school district, spring break begins today. Not a moment too soon for me, I confess. Here are three context clues worksheets on the verb venerate (it’s transitive), the adjective venerable, and the noun veneration. These three in combination assist students, in my experience, see the way that the parts of speech work in English morphology and vice versa.

If you are on break this week, I bid you a restful vacation.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Technique (n)

Because it’s a common enough word in English, this context clues worksheet on the noun technique is easily justified for classroom use (that and the fact that it should only take a few minutes to complete).

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Magic Realism

Here are a reading on magic realism and its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet if they are of any interest to your students or you.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Cosmo

Finally, on this very productive Wednesday morning, here is a worksheet on the Greek word root cosmo. It means, as you probably assumed, both universe and world.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Tangent (n) and Tangential (adj)

If you can use them, here are two context clues worksheets on the noun tangent and its corresponding adjective, tangential.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Learning Support: English Language Arts Posters Text

For a variety of reasons, I have always found the kinds of classroom decorations available for purchase in “teachers’ stores” (what the heck is a teachers store, anyway?) to be insincerely cheerful and annoyingly inauthentic. For that reason, I developed a short unit on making classroom posters. One component of this exercise is this raw text for making classroom posters on English Language Arts topics.

Observing students as they work on creating posters helps me assess a wide range of student abilities, including organizing and executing a task as well as persisting to finish that task, following directions, reading, writing, and spelling, and understanding the basic concepts the text outlines.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.