Category Archives: Worksheets

This category designates worksheets for classroom use with students.

The Weekly Text, February 8, 2019

OK, for the second Friday of Black History Month 2019, here is a high-interest reading on seminal Hip-Hop group Public Enemy and the vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet that accompanies it.

Years ago, I set out to write a reading and writing unit on the History of Hip-Hop, starting from a pithy remark Chuck D made to characterize Hip-Hop, to wit that the musical genre in its manifestations was “CNN for Black people.” Even though the seriously alienated students in whose service I contrived this material took great interest in it, the principal of the school forbade me from teaching it. I have yet to revisit that material and take it further, as I have no reason to think any of the principals I’ve worked for since would have allowed me to present this high-interest, differentiated material.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Everyday Edit: Duke Ellington

Here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on Duke Ellington which Mark’s Text Terminal routes to your from the good people at Education World. That hyperlink will take you to a year’s worth of Everyday Edit worksheets–for free!–if you find them useful in your practice.

Miles Davis and Fusion Jazz

When I was in high school, one of the ways one exercised one’s will to power was to possess more, and deeper, cultural knowledge. This was particularly true of music. The more obscure and unlistenable prog-rock band and recordings one could find, the more social capital one possessed. I won’t bore you with the details of this; if I mentioned the names of some of these rock groups, you almost certainly wouldn’t know them. That’s how arcane this knowledge was and is, and how ephemeral and transient the music turned out to be.

That was never true, however, of one of the masterpiece albums a friend of mine played for me when I was about 16. Miles Davis’s Bitches Brew is simply a seminal album: it broke new ground, and still sounds fresh and innovative today. It also gave rise to a new genre of music–jazz fusion, or fusion jazz–depending on which word one wants modifying the other.

Here is a reading on Miles Davis’ invention of and contributions to fusion jazz with a vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet to accompany it. I’ve found students with even a modest interest in music find this material interesting.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Independent Practice: Mansa Musa

Now that I’m working in a school district where deep instruction in world history is a pedagogical afterthought–if that–I appreciate more than ever New York State’s high standards for social studies instruction. Over the years, I taught or co-taught freshman global studies, for which classes I developed this independent practice worksheet on Mansa Musa. He’s an important figure in world history, and the students I serve in my current posting have no idea who he is.

Which would be a scandal if anyone here actually cared,

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: NAACP

If you can use it for Black History Month 2019, or any other month for that matter, since the organization is an important part of United States history, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the NAACP.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Everyday Edit: Voting Rights Act of 1965

Here is an Everyday Edit on the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Usually in this spot at the bottom of a post, I beg for copyediting assistance if readers catch typos in my work, as well as peer review of its efficacy. I needn’t do that here, because this worksheet comes from the generous operators of Education World, who give away a year’s worth of them, which you’ll find if you click that lengthy hyperlink.

Richard Pryor

OK, here, on an seasonably warm morning (34 degrees at 4:25 AM in Massachusetts) is a reading on the late, great, Richard Pryor and its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.