Tag Archives: Asian Pacific History

The Weekly Text, April 17, 2020

First of all, let me reiterate, as I mentioned in the post currently pinned to the top of this blog, April is not Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2020, May is, just as every year in the month of May we observe this themed history month celebrating our neighbors of Asian Pacific descent. I offer in extenuation only the weakest excuse for this lapse at Mark’s Text Terminal: the coronavirus pandemic threw me off, and the attendant social isolation only exacerbated my confusion.

Now, that said, I have been trying to publish at least ten posts a day for the benefit of homebound parents and students. For a few moments this morning, while enjoying the ambience at the laundromat, I considered taking down all the posts I’ve already published on observation of Asian Pacific Heritage Month. The fact is, I need to take a break from the pace I’ve been setting for myself; so, this year, Mark’s Text Terminal celebrates the accomplishments and contributions of Asian Pacific Americans a month early.

For which I apologize. The good news is this: from the home page, you can look at the word cloud in the upper-right-hand margin and click on “Asian Pacific History,” which will take you to several years worth of posts on this subject.

For today, however, Mark’s Text Terminal offers this reading on the influential Japanese artist known simply as Hokusai along with a vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet to accompany it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Matsuo Basho I

“An old pond—

A frog tumbles in—

The sound of water.”

Poem (translation by Bernard Lionel Einbond)

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Independent Practice: Shogunate

Here is a worksheet on the shogunate, a form of governmental organization in Japan that lasted for almost 700 years. The word comes from shogun and indicates a military dictator.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Evelyne Accad

“Evelyne Accad: (1943-) Lebanese poet, novelist, and literary critic. Born in Lebanon, she emigrated to France in her twenties. Among her critical works is Sexuality and War: Literary Masks of the Middle East (1990), which draws upon her experience of the civil war in Lebanon, feminist and antiwar theory, and an extensive reading of such authors as Tahar Ben Jelloun and Etel Adnan. Accad’s only novel available in English, L’Excisee (1982; tr The Excised Woman, 1989), analyzes ritual clitoridectomy and its effects on young Muslim women, usually ‘female excision’ as a metaphor that includes the suppression of women on a broader, cultural level. Accad has authored five other works of criticism, fiction, and poetry.”

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Independent Practice: Muhammad

Here, in the ongoing observation of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2020 at Mark’s Text Terminal, is an independent practice worksheet on Muhammad, the prophet of Islam.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Independent Practice: Islam

Here is an independent practice (i.e. homework) worksheet on Islam. It’s a short reading with a few questions. While I wrote it to send home as homework, it could be used as the basis for a lesson on the many conceptual aspects of Islam students should probably understand: monotheism, prophets and prophecy, obligation, religious and otherwise, intellectual and religious lineage, and sectarianism, just to name a few.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Bunraku

Bunraku: Japanese puppet theater. Developed during the Tokugawa period, the most important bunraku plays were written by Chikamitsu Monzaemon. The dolls, about three feet in size, are remarkably lifelike; they are operated by their puppet masters who sit on stage and move about with their puppets. The musical narrative (joruri) is chanted by a reciter (gidayu) to the accompaniment of instruments. Many of the same plays have been adapted to kabuki drama.

Excerpted from: Murphy, Bruce, ed. Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia, Fourth Edition. New York: Harper Collins, 1996.