Tag Archives: Asian Pacific History

Cultural Literacy: Kemal Ataturk

This Cultural Literacy worksheet on Kemal Ataturk is a nice introduction to the concept of modernising traditional societies, if teaching that sort of thing is in your wheelhouse.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Assyria

“Assyria: An ancient country in what is now northern Iraq, It was originally centered on Ashur, a city-state on the west bank of the Tigris, which first became prominent and expanded its borders in the 14th century B.C. From the 8th to the late 7th century B.C. Assyria was the dominant Near-Eastern power and created an empire which stretched from the Persian Gulf to Egypt. Its capital city was Nineveh near modern Mosul, Iraq. The state fell in 612 B.C., defeated by a coalition of Medes and Chaldeans.”

Excerpted from: Wright, Edmund, Ed. The Oxford Desk Encyclopedia of World History. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

Independent Practice: Sumer II

Here is the second of two (I posted the first two days ago, so it is just below this one) independent practice worksheets on Sumer.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Eightfold Path of the Buddha

“Right View * Right Intention * Right Speech * Right Action * Right Livelihood * Right Effort* Right Mindfulness * Right Concentration

This is not a sequential course of study that is to be ticked off with examinations and advancements to the next state of the path, but a path to be engaged with all of your life. It must begin with a clear view of the Four Noble Truths.”

Excerpted from: Rogerson, Barnaby. Rogerson’s Book of Numbers: The Culture of Numbers–from 1,001 Nights to the Seven Wonders of the World. New York: Picador, 2013.

Independent Practice: Sumer I

Happy Memorial Day, and don’t forget to tip your hat to the veterans among us. You are enjoying, I hope, a relaxing and stimulating. Today begins the final week of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2019.

In observation of this themed history month, Mark’s Text Terminal offers this independent practice worksheet on Sumer; it’s the first of two–the second one is just a couple of posts up the blog from this.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

8 Immortals

“Chung-Li Chuan * Ho Hsien-ku * Chang Kuo * Lu Tung-pin * Han Hsiang-tzu * Ts’ao Kuo-chiu * Li T’ieh-kuai * Lan Ts’ai-ho

This Taoist pantheon of gods, heroes, and historical individuals had by the thirteenth century become a sort of national pantheon of Chinese saints. Painted on silk, depicted on vases, sculpted and used as a central motif in story telling, they are a ubiquitous element in art. They are also known as the Eight Immortal Scholars of the Han.

Chung-li Ch’uan is usually depicted as a bearded sage with fan; Ho Hsien-ku, as a young girl holding a lotus; Chang Kuo is a comical bearded figure mounted back to front on a white mule with a bamboo drum; Lu Tung-pin, the bearded patron of barbers, is equipped with a fly whisk and word slung across his back; Han Hsiang-tzu is a youthful flute player and the patron saint of musicians; Ts’ao Kuo-chiu is an elderly bearded figure (the patron of actors) usually seen playing castanets; Li T’ieh-kuai is a beggar with a gourd bowl and iron crutch; while Lan Ts’ai-ho is a woman holding a basket of flowers, who is (naturally) the patron saint of florists.

Excerpted from: Rogerson, Barnaby. Rogerson’s Book of Numbers: The Culture of Numbers–from 1,001 Nights to the Seven Wonders of the World. New York: Picador, 2013.

The Weekly Text, May 24, 2019

For week 4 of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2019, Mark’s Text Terminal offers this reading on the Korean War with its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.