Tag Archives: Black History

Black History Month 2019: Coda

Earlier this week, NBC News ran this surprisingly frank and cogent piece on Black History Month. Under any circumstances, and particularly those in which I’ve spent the past 16 years working, I’ve never found satisfying the idea of a single month for Black History; as this feature rightly observes, in the not particularly humble opinion of Mark’s Text Terminal, Black History is United States History.

Thurgood Marshall on the Right to Intellectual Freedom

“If the First Amendment means anything, it means that a State has no business telling a man, sitting alone in his own house, what books he may read or what films he may watch.”

Thurgood Marshall

Stanley v. Georgia (1969)

Excerpted from: Shapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Independent Practice: Aksum

Here is an independent practice worksheet on the Kingdom of Aksum, which was located in the north of present-day Ethiopia. If you teach social studies, and particularly global studies, or world history, of whatever your school or district calls the history of global civilizations, than you are no doubt aware of the importance of Aksum.

This is really something, I think, kids ought to know.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Thurgood Marshall

OK: here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Thurgood Marshall to reminds students of this major–and great–figure in the United States in the twentieth century.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Muhammad Ali on His Career in Sports

“It’s just a job. Grass grows, birds fly, waves pound the sand, I beat people up.”

Muhammad Ali

Quoted in N.Y. Times, 6 April 1977

Excerpted from: Shapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

 

Chuck Berry

Here, on a Tuesday morning as Black History Month 2019 winds down, is a reading on the great Chuck Berry and its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet.

This is the guy, basically, who invented rock and roll. High schoolers should know who he is.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Richard Wright

 “1908-1960 American novelist. Born on a farm near Natchez, Mississippi, Wright, largely self-educated, began to write after he moved to Chicago in 1934. Often associated with Nelson Algren, James Farrell, and the Chicago realists, he wrote powerfully dramatic books exploring the ways in which blacks have been shaped and misshaped by white society. His first published work, Uncle Tom’s Children (1938), a collection of four novellas, was followed by Native Son (1940), which became a minor classic and was made into a film in 1951 and again in 1986. Wright was a member of the Communist Party from 1932 to 1944, lived in Mexico for much of the 1940s, and moved to Paris in 1946, where he remained until his death. His autobiography, Black Boy appeared in 1945. Other works include The Outsider (1953), a philosophical novel; White Man, Listen! (1957); The Long Dream (1958), a novel; and Eight Men (1961), a collection of stories published posthumously, which contains some of his finest writing.”

Excerpted from: Murphy, Bruce, ed. Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia, Fourth Edition. New York: Harper Collins, 1996.