Tag Archives: Black History

Cultural Literacy: Emancipation Proclamation

This Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Emancipation Proclamation does a very nice job of including the fundamental political cynicism behind the document as a political gesture and an act of liberation. In so doing (and you will see that there is plenty of room to expand this worksheet, which you can easily do because, like just about everything else published on Mark’s Text Terminal, it is in Microsoft Word), it opens a lot of room to ask big questions about the document itself, as well as others like it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Book of Answers: Langston Hughes

“What Langston Hughes poem refers to a ‘raisin in the sun’? ‘Harlem’ (1951). Hughes asks: ‘What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun?’”

Excerpted from: Corey, Melinda, and George Ochoa. Literature: The New York Public Library Book of Answers. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1993.

Cultural Literacy: Langston Hughes

Last but not least on this fine afternoon, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Langston Hughes if you need it. He is another figure in Black History who bears extended scrutiny, so this worksheet really serves as the sparest of introductions to him.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weary Blues

“Got the weary blues

And can’t be satisfied—

I ain’t happy no mo’

And I wish that I had died.”

Weary Blues” 1. 27 (1926)

Langston Hughes

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Cultural Literacy: Abolitionism

OK, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on abolitionism if you can use it. It’s a topic that in my not especially humble opinion bears great scrutiny, so this short exercise really can only properly serve as an introduction to the word and concept.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Book of Answers: Frederick Douglass

“When did Frederick Douglass escape from slavery? The Maryland-born slave (c. 1817-82) escaped in 1838 and traveled to Massachusetts. He published his Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass in 1845.”

Excerpted from: Corey, Melinda, and George Ochoa. Literature: The New York Public Library Book of Answers. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1993.

Cultural Literacy: The Fugitive Slave Act

OK, last but not least this morning, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Fugitive Slave Act, another law designed to dehumanize and keep in bondage Americans of African descent. Not your proudest hour, United States.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.