Monthly Archives: June 2019

A Miscellania of Rotten Rejections

Peyton Place, that ersatz Desire Under the Elms, a mish-mash of small-town sext steamy enought to tempt, you would think, all profit-minded publishers (and what other kind, you might ask, is there?) was turned down by fourteen of them. A work as different from Peyton Place as can imagined, William Appelman Williams’s The Tragedy of American Diplomacy, was rejected by more than twenty publishers before it was finally accepted. It has now been reprinted several times and is recognized as an outstanding revisionist work. Jonathan Livingston Seagull also flew through some twenty rejections.”

Excerpted from: Bernard, Andre, and Bill Henderson, eds. Pushcart’s Complete Rotten Reviews and Rejections. Wainscott, NY: Pushcart Press, 1998.

Anathema (n)

When I wrote this context clues worksheet on the noun anathema, I meant to write one on the verb anathemize, which kept turning up on some curriculum on medieval history that turned up in a social studies class I co-taught some years ago. This worksheet, I guess, would be easy enough to convert to the verb if one were so inclined.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Philander Knox on Politics as Usual

“Oh, Mr. President, do not let so great an achievement suffer from any taint of legality.”

Philander C. Knox (1853-1921)

Quoted in Tyler Dennett, John Hay: From Poetry to Politics (1933). Knox’s reply, as attorney general, to President Theodore Roosevelt’s request for a legal justification of his acquisition of the Panama Canal Zone.

Excerpted from: Shapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Manic-Depressive Disorder

For health teachers and may counselors, this reading on manic-depressive disorder and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet might be useful. This illness is relatively common in teens, in my experience.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Current Number of The American Educator

Elsewhere on this blog, I have sung the praises of The American Educator, the quarterly published by my union, The American Federation of Teachers. Let me belabor my point a tad further here by saying that I think this is a first-rate journal of educational theory and practice; it’s where I first encountered Daniel Willingham, who really is doing as much as anyone out there (with his “Ask the Cognitive Scientist” column in The American Educator as well as his excellent books) to assist classroom teachers in applying research to practice.

The current number of the magazine addresses the issue of teaching traumatized students. I started my career working with traumatized adolescents in one of New England’s “ivy league” psychiatric hospitals, and I have continued to work with these kids as a teacher.

A discussion of this population’s needs is long, long, overdue. I cannot sufficiently or strongly encourage teachers to read this issue of The American Educator from cover to cover. This is vital stuff every teacher should know.

Cultural Literacy: Every Dog Has His Day

I’m off this morning to take a certification test to teach history to high-schoolers here in Massachusetts. On my way out the door, let me drop this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the American idiom “every dog has his day.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Book of Answers: Alice Walker

Did Alice Walker start out by writing fiction or poetry? The first published work of the poet and novelist was a book of poetry: Once: Poems (1968). She followed up soon after, however, with a novel: The Third Life of Grange Copeland (1970).

Excerpted from: Corey, Melinda, and George Ochoa. Literature: The New York Public Library Book of Answers. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1993.