Tag Archives: sports

Wayne Gretzky

At the beginning of another work week (for me, one of the odder pleasures of getting older is no longer dreading Monday mornings), here is a reading on Wayne Gretzky and the comprehension worksheet that accompanies it. I’ve been producing quite a few new readings and worksheets, particularly high interest stuff, so they’ll be showing up here from time to time.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Joe Montana

Here is a relatively high-interest reading on quarterback Joe Montana and a reading comprehension worksheet to accompany it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The 1966 NCAA Basketball Championship

Here is a reading on the 1966 NCAA Men’s Basketball Championship with its attending comprehension worksheet. This is a story of ending an injustice in American collegiate sports, and the undermining of racial prejudice. As such, I suspect that for the right students, this material would be of compelling high interest.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Seasonal Quote

“Hit ’em where they ain’t.”

William Henry “Wee Willie” Keeler (U.S. baseball player, 1872-1923)

Quoted in Brooklyn Eagle, 29 July 1901

Excerpted from: Shapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Babe Ruth

As July 17, the date of the 2018 MLB All-Star Game, approaches, I thought now is as good a time as any to post this reading on Babe Ruth and the comprehension worksheet that accompanies it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, June 2, 2017

OK: It has been some time since I posted an entire lesson plan, so for this week’s Text I offer a complete lesson that introduces students to prepositions. This lesson begins with two (the second one in the event that the lesson runs to two days) do-now exercises, namely Everyday Edits worksheets, the first one on the Surrender at Appomattox and the the second one on the Modern Olympic Games. (Incidentally, if you like these Everyday Edit Worksheets, the good people at Education World give them away at their site, and you will find the answer keys to them there as well.)

The mainstay of this lesson is this scaffolded proofreading and cloze exercise worksheet that introduces students to prepositions and their uses. Here is a learning support on prepositions that accompanies this lesson (and all six lessons in this unit, which I will post over time, I suppose). Finally, here is a teacher’s copy and answer key to assist you as you deliver this lesson.

That’s it. If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, May 19, 2017

I meant to post this Intellectual Devotional reading on Cy Young and this reading comprehension worksheet to accompany it several weeks ago, closer to Major League Baseball’s Opening Day. Better late than never, I guess: here is this week’s Text on the legendary pitcher.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.