Tag Archives: short exercises

Enlighten (vt), Enlightenment (n)

When I co-taught global studies classes in New York City, the fact that the deeper conceptual processes of history were ignored in favor of a pedagogy of discrete, decontextualized facts greatly troubled me. This was a particular problem–and I am confident it remains so, particularly in the classroom in which I served during the final two years of my tenure in New York–in teaching the French Revolution and its animating intellectual ideology, the Enlightenment. Students in the classroom I shared could walk away from the unit on this period with absolutely no sense of the enormity of its epochal influence. Therefore, they could not understand that in many respects, the world, especially the Western world, continues to argue over and contest the legacy of the Enlightenment.

In an attempt to convey the significance of the Enlightenment in my own classroom, I started with these two context clues worksheets on the verb enlighten and the noun enlightenment. The verb, incidentally, is only used transitively.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

English Usage: Affect, Effect

Here is an English usage worksheet on the complications of using the words affect and effect, both as verbs and nouns.

As a verb, affect is used both intransitively and transitively; its use is complicated by the fact that this verb can have two meanings. Effect as a verb also carries complicated usage rules which are mitigated by the fact that it only is used transitively.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: The Night of the Crabs

Here is a lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “The Night of the Crabs.” I planned to open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concept of survivor’s guilt. You’ll need the PDF of the illustration and questions to investigate this crime. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key to close the case and bring a culprit to justice.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Engage (vi/vt), Engagement (n)

Alright, let’s get started on this bright, sunny morning with two context clues worksheets on the verb engage–used both intransitively and transitively–and the noun engagement. These are a couple of heavily used words in English, and these documents presented as a a pair will help students, in addition to developing their own understanding of these words, differentiate between verbs and nouns.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Class Hierarchies and Their Origins

While this lesson plan on class hierarchies and their origins isn’t exactly the most distinguished work I have ever posted here, it may be of some use in you classroom. In any case, as always, the documents here are in Microsoft Word, so you can modify them to suit your and your students’ needs and circumstances. I open this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the noun civilization; if the lesson goes into a second day (and if the questioning and discussion of this material in your classroom expand to the extent they generally did in mine, you will be on this material for two days) , here is another on the noun civilian. If nothing else, by the end of this lesson students will have a fair grasp of the Latin word root civilis and its conceptual significance. Finally, here is the reading and comprehension worksheet that is the work of this lesson.

Parenthetically, as I review the social studies material I prepared over the years, I find it is at best a mishmosh. Less charitably, it is a mess. The social studies units I wrote over the years reflect more than anything my attempts to teach global studies in a way that would give the struggling students I served their best chance at passing the high-stakes New York State Global History and Geography Regents Examination. To put it a succinctly as possible, I was always, in my curriculum design in social studies, racing to keep up with that infernal test.

Rather than try to sort through this material, which has delayed my publishing this material, I have decided to post it as is. It won’t always be the best and the brightest, but it will be manipulable so that you, dear reader, can make it better. If you ever consider leaving comments on this site, I would greatly appreciate your thoughts on these global history lessons.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Capital Offense

OK, starting out on a very gray and chilly morning considering that it is May 12, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concept of a capital offense. Needless to say, this clears fruitful ground for a discussion of the consequence of a conviction for a capital offense, capital punishment, i.e. the death penalty.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

English Usage: Aesthetic, Ascetic

Here is an English usage worksheet on the adjectives aesthetic and ascetic; these two words, just as they are, can also be used as nouns, so bear that in mind when using this document with students.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.