Tag Archives: short exercises

Liaison (n)

Lately, I’ve been using Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day to guide my writing of context clues worksheets. Here is a context clues worksheet on the noun liaison which was yesterday’s word.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Mea Culpa (n)

Because it was Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day yesterday, and because it is arguably a term–and definitely a concept–students should understand, here is a context clues worksheet on the noun mea culpa. As it sounds, it is a Latin phrase and is an acknowledgement of one’s fault or error. Another way of thinking about is to remember that if you do something wrong, you are culpable for your action and its consequence.

If you find typos in  and this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Pedant (n), Pedantic (adj)

OK, one more thing on this very chilly (14 degrees here in Springfield, Massachusetts) Monday morning, to wit these two context clues worksheets on noun pedant and the adjective pedantic.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Allen Ginsberg

From my sophomore year of high school on, I was quite taken with The Beat Generation. In the event that you have any students with a similar interest, this cultural literacy worksheet on the late, great Allen Ginsberg might be a place for them to start in the pursuit an inquiry into the Beats.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

 

Paradigm (n)

Alright, here is another one of Merriam-Webster’s Words of the Day rendered as a context clues worksheet on the noun paradigm.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Populace (n) and Populous (adj)

It’s chilly in Springfield, Massachusetts this morning, though nothing like the New England winters I remember 40 years ago. Still, the 19-degree temperatures at the moment aren’t exactly summoning. So I’ll sit here for another hour or so working on blog posts.

To that end, here are five worksheets on the homophones populace and populous.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Venal (adj)

It was Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day yesterday, so here today is a context clues worksheet on the adjective venal. This would be a good instrument to use to introduce a lesson on, say, the Protestant Reformation. You might use the noun–venality–as well; who knows?

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.