Tag Archives: short exercises

Born (adj) and Borne (adj)

While I sit her waiting for a Time Machine backup to finish, here is a set of five homophone worksheets on the adjectives born and borne.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, September 13, 2019

As I’ve mentioned elsewhere on this blog, the lessons I prepared to attend the Crime and Puzzlement books are quite frequently downloaded. Because I am exhausted from trying to get the school year started, and therefore bereft of imagination and initiative, I offer, as this week’s Text, a complete lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Dropout.”

I use this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the expression “Sword of Damocles” to open the lesson after a class change. You’ll need this PDF of the illustration and questions that drive this lesson to teach it. Finally, here is the answer key typescript; it’s in word if you need to differentiate it for your students.

And that makes ten posts for this week, so I’m done here for the moment. I hope your school year is off to a good start.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Destructive Competition

It’s 44 degrees in Bennington, Vermont at 5:45. Walking to work this morning was a pleasantly bracing experience. Here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on destructive competition for you business and economics teachers out there.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Amend (vi/vt) and Amendment (n)

OK, before I leave work on this damp, cool, Vermont afternoon, here is a pair of context clues worksheets on the verb amend and the noun amendment, if you can use them.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Due Process of Law

This Cultural Literacy worksheet on due process of law could probably serve as an introduction to any number of lessons that deal with the concepts of constitutions, constitutional law,  and civil rights,  as well as jurisprudence in general.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, September 6, 2019

Ok, today marks the end of my second week of work at Mount Anthony Union High School in Bennington, Vermont. It sure is nice to be back in Vermont after twenty-three years away. As fall approaches, I anticipate the mountainside colors of October with great pleasure. I’ve never lived in this part of the state before, but I hope to spend the rest of my working life here.

Anyway, this week’s Text is a complete lesson plan on the interrogative. pronoun. I begin this lesson with this worksheet on the homophones you’re and your. Should classroom events stall this lesson, here is a second short exercise, this on a Cultural Literacy worksheet on plagiarism. Finally, here is the structured, scaffolded worksheet on the interrogative pronoun that is the mainstay of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Ancient (adj)

It’s Friday again, so I’ve arrived at work early to publish some blog posts. Here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective ancient if you need it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.