Tag Archives: short exercises

The Weekly Text, November 18, 2019

This week’s Text is a set of five worksheets on the homophones sight (noun), site (noun and transitive verb), and cite (transitive verb). These are very commonly used words in the English language. For some learners, these are easily confused. Part of the reason I wrote this was to help students who needed to learn to cite sources for research papers. I took it as an opportunity to do some vocabulary building. These are short exercises for opening a class period after a transition.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Anorexia Nervosa

I have other materials related to the topic, but if you need something quick to introduce it, this Cultural Literacy worksheet on anorexia nervosa might be suitable.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Ransack (vt)

Friday has rolled around once again. In southwestern Vermont this week, we’ve had some unseasonably chilly weather and enough early season snow to cover the ground.

Here is a context clues worksheet on the verb ransack, which is only used transitively; unsurprising, since one must ransack something, mustn’t one?

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Stalinism

Finally, on this suddenly chilly Tuesday afternoon, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Stalinism that ought to be useful in a number of places in the high school social studies curriculum.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Putsch (n)

Because it came up consistently in connection with Adolf Hitler’s rise to power in Germany when I taught sophomore global studies in New York City, I wrote this context clues worksheet on the German loan word putsch for use with the lesson on Hitler’s infamous Beer Hall Putsch in 1923 (I’m sorry Nietzsche didn’t live long enough to bear witness to this incident; the world would have seen his contempt once and for all for low demagogues like Hitler ).

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Prodigious (adj)

Moving right along, here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective prodigious, a word that students probably ought to know before they graduate high school. As I post this, I realize I probably ought to write a worksheet on the noun, prodigy, as well.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Sparta

Ah, Friday! Is there a sweeter day of the week for working people?

If you can use it, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Sparta–you know, the ancient Greek city-state known for its, uh, Spartan characteristics.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.