Tag Archives: short exercises

Cultural Literacy: Quorum

Maybe you can use this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the quorum as a concept. I’d always assumed that the plural of this noun was quora, but as it turns out, and you can find this on the excellent question-and-answer website called, coincidentally, Quora, that the plural of quorum is more properly quorums. There is a fairly lively discourse on this; search “plural of quorum” if this is the kind of thing that interests you.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Kinetic (adj)

Here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective kinetic. While I’ve only just developed it, I can think of a myriad of uses for it in the classroom.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, July 19, 2019

It’s Friday again, so again it’s time for the Weekly Text at Mark’s Text Terminal.

This week’s Text is a lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “The Lunchroom Murder.” This Cultural Literacy worksheet on “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?”, the first line of Shakespeare’s 18th sonnet. Direct from the pages of the first Crime and Puzzlement book, here are the illustration and list of questions that drive this lesson. Finally, you’ll need the answer key to solve this mystery.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, July 12, 2019

Because I am finding myself in an advanced, and badly needed, state of relaxation, these two context clues worksheets on the noun propaganda and the verb propagandize must suffice for this week’s Text. For the record, propagandize is used both transitively and intransitively.

Mark’s Text Terminal hopes you are enjoying your summer.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Independent Practice: John Calvin

It’s a cool and overcast Thursday morning in southeastern Vermont. with thunderstorms in the forecast.

Here is an independent practice worksheet on John Calvin. It might pair (as they say in the hipper bistros) well with any of the context clues worksheets posted below on the words zeal, zealot, or zealous, if zeal is a concept you need students to understand. Calvin was, after all, a textbook zealot.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: The Treaty of Versailles

On a crisp Monday morning in southeastern Vermont, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Treaty of Versailles. This is a full-page reading exercise with six comprehension questions, so it can be used, I think, as independent practice. In any case, I’ve tagged it as such.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Churlish (adj)

It’s Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day today, so here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective churlish.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.