Tag Archives: readings

Independent Practice: Roman Law

Because it is the basis of most Western legal codes, I wrote this independent practice worksheet on Roman law to reinforce the conceptual understanding in the students I serve.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Beowulf

As we count down the days to the beginning of the school year, it may be a good time, particularly if you’re teaching English in the upper grades, to post this short reading on Beowulf and this reading comprehension worksheet that attends it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Independent Practice: Latitude and Longitude

Here for all you social studies teachers, if you can use it, is anindependent practice worksheet on latitude and longitude that I assign early on in the freshman global studies cycle.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Postcolonialism

Today is August 6. On this day in 1945, the United States dropped “Little Boy,” the nation’s first atomic bomb used in combat, on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Sir Alexander Fleming, the discoverer of penicillin, was born on this day in 1881. It’s the anniversary of the Voting Rights Act, which President Lyndon Johnson signed into law on this day in 1965. Finally, this is Bolivian Independence Day

So today seems like an appropriate time to post this reading on postcolonialism along with the comprehension worksheet that accompanies it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

6 Physicians of Antiquity

  • Plato
  • Hippocrates
  • Socrates
  • Aristotle
  • Pythagoras
  • Galen

“These six physicians were heroes of the medieval era, both to the Christian West and the Muslim East. Dante places them amongst the classical poets in the outer circle of hell, which was set aside for virtuous pagans–a place of green fields overlooked by a castle with seven gates for the seven virtues.”

Excerpted from: Rogerson, Barnaby. Rogerson’s Book of Numbers: The Culture of Numbers–from 1,001 Nights to the Seven Wonders of the World. New York: Picador, 2013.

Independent Practice: The Magna Carta

Today is August 5. On this day in 1912, the Swedish diplomat (and architect and businessman) Raoul Wallenberg was born. It is also the birthday (1930) of Neil Armstrong. In 1957, on this day, American Bandstand (a show, for some reason, I always hated, even as a kid) made its national premiere on ABC.

Here is an independent practice assignment on the Magna Carta which is a key event in world history, as well as a key concept in social studies, i.e. limiting the power of leaders.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Cinq-Cents

Cinq-Cents—the Council of 500—was the elective assembly which ruled France at the end of the Revolution, between the end of the terror and the seizure of power by General Bonaparte (1795-99). Much overlooked now, the so-called Directory period was an attempt at creating a stable and balanced democracy, with the Assembly empowered to nominate five directors, who, once they had been approved by the 250-strong Senate of ‘Ancients,’ ruled the Republic.

The Assembly consciously looked back to the democracy of ancient Athens, which was governed through the Boule, an assembly of 500. However, the ancient model attempted to avoid the perils of influence peddling and the factionalism of party politics by cutting out the voting process; instead, each of the ten tribes of Athens and its hinterland held a ballot to send fifty of their men to attend this standing council for a year. After a year’s service, they had to resign.”

Excerpted from: Rogerson, Barnaby. Rogerson’s Book of Numbers: The Culture of Numbers–from 1,001 Nights to the Seven Wonders of the World. New York: Picador, 2013.