Tag Archives: questioning and inquiry

Independent Practice: Hinduism

Here is an independent practice worksheet on Hinduism. I don’t know about your school district, but in the years I taught in New York City, understanding the South Asian civilization (s) was a key part of the global studies curriculum.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: The Cruise of the Good Ship Contessa

Moving right along, here is a lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “The Good Ship Contessa.” I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on perhaps the best-known of Aesop’s Fables, “The Boy Who Cried Wolf.” Here is the scan of the illustrations and questions with which to conduct the investigation of this case. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: The Possible Dreams Auction

OK, moving right along, here is a lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “The Possible Dreams Auction.” I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the idiom “Feather One’s Own Nest.” You’ll need this scan of the illustration and questions that drive the investigation in order to conduct it. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Aesop’s Fables: The Fox and the Crow

OK, finally for this morning, here is a lesson plan on Aesop’s fable “The Fox and the Crow” along with its reading and comprehension worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Independent Practice: Silk Road

OK, here is an independent practice worksheet worksheet on the Silk Road. This is part of the month-long observance of Asian Pacific American History Month 2020 (as are the next couple of posts above) at Mark’s Text Terminal. Over time, I’ve come to realize that this worksheet can open a discussion on the concept of a global economy; indeed, the Silk Road is in every respect the beginning of the globalization of human economic activity.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Independent Practice: Byzantium

Here are two independent practice worksheets on Byzantium. These are basically short reading comprehension worksheets; however, in New York City, and therefore the state, I assume, Byzantium was part of the global studies curriculum.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: Incident at the Ferry

Here is a lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Incident at the Ferry.” I use this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the American idiom “Every dog has his day” to open this lesson. You’ll need this PDF of the illustration and questions surrounding the case so that your students may conduct their investigation. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key to solve this heinous crime.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.