Tag Archives: planning documents

A Teaching and Learning Support for Teaching Phonics

OK, very quickly, here is a glossary of terms for teaching phonics, if you can use it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Commas and Independent Clauses

[If you’d like this quote in Microsoft Word to use as a learning support, you’ll find that here.]

Place a comma before a conjunction introducing an independent clause.

 The early records of the city have disappeared, and the story of its first years can no longer be reconstructed.

The situation is perilous, but there is still one chance of escape.

Two part sentences of which the second member is introduced by as (in the sense of “because”), for, or , nor, or while (in the sense of “and at the same time”) likewise require a comma before the conjunction.

If a dependent clause, or an introductory phrase requiring to be set off with a comma, precedes the second independent clause, no comma is needed after the conjunction.

The situation is perilous, but if we are prepared to act promptly, there is still one chance of escape.

When the subject is the same for both clauses and is expressed only once, a comma is useful if the connective is but. When the connective is and, the comma should be omitted if the relation between the two statements is close or immediate.

           I have heard the arguments, but I am still unconvinced.

          He has several years experience and is thoroughly competent.”

Excerpted from: Strunk, William Jr., and E.B. White. The Elements of Style, Fourth Edition. New York: Longman, 2000.

A Glossary of Teaching for Understanding Terms

Last week, after reading a few pages each morning with my coffee before leaving for work, I finished Martha Stone Wiske’s (ed.) Teaching for Understanding: Linking Research to Practice (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997); yesterday I finished its companion, The Teaching for Understanding Guide by Tina Blythe (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997). From the latter, I cribbed this glossary of Teaching for Understanding terms if you’re inclined to use this planning and instructional framework.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Big Ideas and Planning Questions for Global Studies

While cleaning out the last of some social studies folder, I stumbled across this list of big ideas and planning questions for the freshman global studies classes I taught for several years in New York City. The form and content of this document clearly derives from Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe’s book Understanding by Design, which continues to inform my approach to planning lessons. This looks like something I started brainstorming one day, but then never returned to.

Maybe you can do something with it?

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, July 5, 2019

This week’s Text is a pair of learning supports on using conjunctions.

Now it’s time to go swimming in the Connecticut River, in Putney, Vermont, with friends. I hope you’re enjoying your summer.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

John Dewey on Instructional Planning

“No experience is educative that does not tend both to knowledge of more facts and entertaining of more ideas and to a better, a more orderly arrangement of them…. Experiences in order to be educative, must lead out into an expanding world of subject matter…. This condition is satisfied only as long as the educator views teaching and learning as a continuous process of reconstruction of experience.”

Excerpted from: Wiggins, Grant, and Jay McTighe. Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 1998.

A Writing Prompt from Edmonton, Alberta

[Here’s a writing prompt from the Great White North.]

“Imagine that your Uncle is a Hollywood film producer and has asked for your ideas for a possible new movie. Because many movies are based on books, he has asked you to tell him about a book you’ve read that you think would make a good movie. Write a letter to your uncle and describe a book that you enjoyed and explain why you think it would make a good movie.

Excerpted from: Wiggins, Grant, and Jay McTighe. Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 1998.