Tag Archives: philosophy

Henry Adams on Politics

“Politics as a practice, whatever its professions, has always been the systematic organization of hatreds.”

Henry Adams

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Term of Art: Multiple Intelligences

“Multiple intelligences: An interpretation of intelligence put forward by the US psychologist Howard (Earl) Gardner (born 1943) in his book Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (1983-1993), taking account of abilities of gifted people and virtuosos or experts in various domains, abilities valued in different cultures, and abilities of individuals who have suffered brain damage. In addition to the linguistic, logical-mathematical, and spatial abilities incorporated in conventional interpretations of intelligence, Gardner’s taxonomy includes musical intelligence (used in musical appreciation, composition, and performance), bodily-kinesthetic intelligence (used in sport, dancing, and everyday activities requiring dexterity), interpersonal intelligence (used in relating to others, interpreting social signals, and predicting social outcomes), intrapersonal intelligence (used in understanding and predicting one’s own behavior). In 1997 Gardner added naturalist intelligence (used in discriminating among plants, animals, and other features of the natural world, and in classifying objects in general) as an eighth intelligence and spiritual intelligence and existential intelligence as ‘candidate’ intelligences. Critics have argued that some of these abilities are better interpreted as special talents than as aspects of intelligence.”

Excerpted from: Colman, Andrew M., ed. Oxford Dictionary of Psychology. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Benjamin Stolberg on Experts

“An expert is a person who avoids small error as he sweeps on to the grand fallacy.”

Benjamin Stolberg

Excerpted from: Winokur, Jon, ed. The Big Curmudgeon. New York: Black Dog & Leventhal, 2007.

Term of Art: Acting Out

“Acting out: 1. In psychoanalysis, the enactment rather than the recollection of past events, especially enactments relating to the transference during therapy. It is often impulsive and aggressive, and it is usually uncharacteristic of the patient’s normal behavior. The concept was introduced by Sigmund Freud (1856-1839) in An Outline of Psychoanalysis (1938/40): the patient ‘acts it [the past event] before us, as it were, rather than reporting it to us’ (Standard Edition, XXIII, pp. 144-207, at p. 176). 2. A defense mechanism in which unconscious emotional conflicts or impulses are dealt with by actions, including parapraxes, rather than thought or contemplation. act out vb.”

Excerpted from: Colman, Andrew M., ed. Oxford Dictionary of Psychology. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Cultural Literacy: Power Elite

If comes to us from the sociologist C. Wright Mills, and if there is a better time to post this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concept of the power elite, and to develop and inculcate a critical awareness of the power elite, I don’t know when that would be–although I could say that about so many moments in my own lifetime.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Socrates

Here is a reading on Socrates, history’s first teacher, and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet: this is a core reading in all four of the common branch subjects, and a way of thinking about teaching and learning, for students’ and teachers’ edification.

Incidentally, if you’ve been hanging with William “Bill” S. Preston, Esq. and Ted “Theodore” Logan, as it was my mild misfortune to do over the Labor Day weekend, this Greek philosopher’s name is not pronounced “So-Crates” but rather sock-ruh-tease. Just sayin’.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Consent of the Governed

If there was a better time to post this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concept of the consent of the governed, I can’t imagine when that would be. Don’t forget that this conception of political power and governance comes to us from John Locke. It is at the center of the grievances aired in the Declaration of Independence and epitomizes the political philosophy behind both the Declaration and the United States ConstitutionLiberalism.

Liberalism arrives in English almost intact from the Latin liberalis, meaning “suitable for a freeman.” It is also the stem of a portmanteau I wouldn’t mind seeing disappear from the vernacular, “libtard.” Users of this noun appear quite pleased with themselves when they use it; they shouldn’t be.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Aldous Huxley with Some Good Advice for Our Time

“Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.”

Aldous Huxley

Proper Studies “A Note on Dogma” (1927)

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

Term of Art: Syllogism

“Syllogism: (Greek “reckoning together”) Deduction, from two propositions containing three terms of which one appears in both, of a conclusion that is true if they are true. A stock example is: All men are mortal; Greeks are mortal; so all Greeks are mortal. ‘Men’ is the middle term. ‘Mortal,’ the second term in the conclusion, is the major term and the premise in which it occurs is the major premise. ‘Greeks’ is the minor term and its premise the minor premise.”

Excerpted from: Cuddon, J.A. The Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory. New York: Penguin, 1992.

A Document-Based Questioning (DBQ) Lesson on the Magna Carta

As above and below, this DBQ lesson on the Magna Carta is the ninth of a ten-lesson global studies on reading, analyzing, and interpreting primary historical documents.

In my taxonomic system, I tagged this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concepts of checks and balances in government, but as a short document to get students settled at the beginning of the class period, this isn’t appropriate. It’s a full-page document that might be better used as independent practice (i.e. homework) as it solidly complements the reading from the Magna Carta.

This Cultural Literacy worksheet on the divine right of kings is a half-page exercise and a better fit to begin a class period. It also dovetails conceptually with the content of the Magna Carta.

And, of course, you and your students will need the reading from the Magna Carta with comprehension questions to teach and learn the lesson about political power from the Magna Carta.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.