Tag Archives: philosophy

Nietzsche on the Motivation of a Philosopher

“If you want to understand a philosopher, do not ask what he says, but find out what he wants.”

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

Excerpted from: Winokur, Jon, ed. The Big Curmudgeon. New York: Black Dog & Leventhal, 2007.

Aesop’s Fables: The Crow and the Pitcher

OK: here is a lesson plan on Aesop’s fable “The Crow and the Pitcher” along with its reading and worksheet. You’ll notice that the comprehension questions are sparse and simple. As it happens, I was just beginning to develop a unit on Aesop’s Fables for the middle schoolers I was serving (a population with which I possess, I’m sorry to concede, scant experience) when I left my job in mid-March.

However, as with almost everything you will encounter on Mark’s Text Terminal, these are Microsoft Word documents which can be exported to a word processor of your preference, or manipulated for your use as it is.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Aesop’s Fables: The Fox and the Crow

OK, finally for this morning, here is a lesson plan on Aesop’s fable “The Fox and the Crow” along with its reading and comprehension worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

John Kenneth Galbraith on the Pleasures of His Life

“One of my greatest pleasures in writing has come from the thought that perhaps my work might annoy someone of comfortably pretentious position. Then comes the saddening realization that such people rarely read.”

John Kenneth Galbraith

Excerpted from: Winokur, Jon, ed. The Big Curmudgeon. New York: Black Dog & Leventhal, 2007.

Deduce (vt)

Alright, here is a context clues worksheet on the verb deduce, which is only used transitively. Without getting into a major discussion on the validity of deduction as a means of analysis and cognition, I will say that I consider it inarguable that high school students should know this word and the concept it represents.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Theodor Adorno on Horror and Art

“To write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric.”

Theodor Adorno

Excerpted from: Schapiro, Fred, ed. The Yale Book of Quotations. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

The Prisoner’s Dilemma

Over the years, I have produced a number of documents based on the interest of one student. This reading on the prisoner’s dilemma and its vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet are one such set of documents.

My own first exposure to the prisoner’s dilemma came from a friend who encountered it as an undergraduate in what, if memory serves, was a history course. This same friend went on to law school, so he may have encountered it there. In any case, the prisoner’s dilemma is part of a broader study of mathematical models of human cognition and resultant conduct called game theory. I actually started to develop a unit on game theory when I realized two things: the first was that the student for whom I prepared the material offered in this blog post wasn’t as interested in it as he thought; the second was that I was woefully unqualified to teach a single lesson on game theory, let alone a whole unit.

If you have the time–I didn’t–a unit on game theory might be just the thing for a certain kind of student. However, it is a complicated field, and even adapting it for struggling or alienated high school students is no small task.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.