Tag Archives: parsing sentences

Parsing Sentences Worksheet: Pronouns

Here is, before I go off to proctor a high-stakes test, a parsing sentences worksheet for pronouns. It calls upon students to identify all the pronouns in a series of five sentences.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Parsing Sentences Worksheet: Nouns

Here is a parsing sentences worksheet for nouns. Students read each sentence and identify and underline nouns. I use these to begin class periods and get students settled.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Parsing Sentences Worksheet: Adverbs

Here is a parsing sentences worksheet for adverbs. Students read the sentences and identify all the adverbs in each.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Worksheet on Identifying Active Verbs

Over the past couple of days, and after a couple of decades, I reread William Zinsser’s fine book Writing to Learn; it was every bit as good as I remembered it. William Zinsser was a superlative prose stylist himself. Reading him on writing, quite simply, is a glimpse inside the workshop of a master.

And I found a passage in it, which Mr. Zinsser excerpted from something Norman Mailer wrote about the infamous Benny Paret vs. Emile Griffith III fight in 1962. Because I have a student this year involved and interested in boxing, I grabbed the passage and worked up, just now, this short exercise on identifying active verbs in a passage of text. Nota bene that there are two pages in this document; the second is the teacher’s copy/answer key with the active verbs in bold. I’m still trying to figure out lesson plans for these one-off differentiated worksheets. If you can use it, here is a lesson plan template to accompany the worksheet, which you can complete as you see fit (obviously).

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Parsing Sentences Worksheet: Verbs

Today is April 26, 2018. In 1986 on this day, an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Pripyat, Ukraine. It’s the birthday of John James Audubon; interestingly, he is buried in Trinity Cemetery on 155th Street in Harlem. Today is also the birthday of the man who is arguably the major figure in landscape architecture in the United States, Frederick Law Olmsted, who designed, here in New York City, both Central Park and Prospect Park.

Here is a parsing sentences worksheet for verbs. I understand this is an old-fashioned kind of activity, but that doesn’t render it obsolete. In fact, I maintain that these shore exercises are an effective way to help students understand both English usage and syntax in sentences.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Parsing Sentences Worksheet: Prepositions

Today is April 24th. On this day in 1916, the Easter Rising began in Dublin, Ireland. It’s also the anniversary of the opening of the Library of Congress in 1800. It’s the birthday of an actor I think underrated and underrecognized, Woburn, Massachusetts’ native son, Eric Bogosian.

Here is a parsing sentences worksheet for prepositions that I use in a variety of ways, but primarily to begin an instructional period and get excitable and excited adolescents settled and focused.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Parsing Sentences: Conjunctions

Today is April 17. On this day in history, the United States launched the failed Bay of Pigs invasion, which, depending on whose version of history you subscribe to, was a turning point in our country’s history. Also on this day, in another failure of American foreign policy, Cambodia fell to the Khmer Rouge, a radical Marxist group who initiated an auto-genocide in that nation. Finally, today is Syrian Independence Day, another nation whose fate has tended to be the plaything–or object of abuse, depending again on your view of such things–of Western nations.

Here is a parsing sentences worksheet for conjunctions that is the kind of thing I use to get students settled after a class change.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.