Tag Archives: parsing sentences

The Weekly Text, August 9, 2018

Today is August 9. On this day in 1945, three days after the atomic bomb fell on Hiroshima, a plutonium bomb called Fat Man was dropped on the Japanese city of Nagasaki. In 1974, while I was away at the Philmont Boy Scout Ranch in Cimarron, New Mexico, Richard Nixon, engulfed in the Watergate scandal, resigned the presidency. Today is Singapore’s National Day, which celebrates that nation’s independence from Malaysia, which it achieved in 1956.

This week’s Text is four parsing sentences worksheet for nouns. These are pretty simple literacy exercises designed to get students reading and understanding the structure of basic declarative sentences by analyzing the parts of speech in them.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Parsing Sentences Worksheets: Adjectives

Over time, I have begun to wonder if parsing sentences, somewhere along the line. I think not, at least in my classroom, which is why I wrote, and now pass along to you, these four worksheets for parsing adjectives in basic declarative sentences.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Parsing Sentences Worksheets: Verbs

Today is July 24. Simon Bolivar was born on this day in 1783, as was Amelia Earhart. It’s Pioneer Day in Utah.

Here are four parsing sentences worksheets for verbs that might help students sort out the parts of speech in declarative sentences.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Parsing Sentences Worksheet: Pronouns

Here is, before I go off to proctor a high-stakes test, a parsing sentences worksheet for pronouns. It calls upon students to identify all the pronouns in a series of five sentences.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Parsing Sentences Worksheet: Nouns

Here is a parsing sentences worksheet for nouns. Students read each sentence and identify and underline nouns. I use these to begin class periods and get students settled.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Parsing Sentences Worksheet: Adverbs

Here is a parsing sentences worksheet for adverbs. Students read the sentences and identify all the adverbs in each.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Worksheet on Identifying Active Verbs

Over the past couple of days, and after a couple of decades, I reread William Zinsser’s fine book Writing to Learn; it was every bit as good as I remembered it. William Zinsser was a superlative prose stylist himself. Reading him on writing, quite simply, is a glimpse inside the workshop of a master.

And I found a passage in it, which Mr. Zinsser excerpted from something Norman Mailer wrote about the infamous Benny Paret vs. Emile Griffith III fight in 1962. Because I have a student this year involved and interested in boxing, I grabbed the passage and worked up, just now, this short exercise on identifying active verbs in a passage of text. Nota bene that there are two pages in this document; the second is the teacher’s copy/answer key with the active verbs in bold. I’m still trying to figure out lesson plans for these one-off differentiated worksheets. If you can use it, here is a lesson plan template to accompany the worksheet, which you can complete as you see fit (obviously).

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.