Tag Archives: historical terms

Historical Terms: Anti-Clericalism

“Anti-clericalism: Opposition to organized religion, particularly the power and privileges of the Roman Catholic Church. Anti-clericalism, though not a coherent political doctrine, has a long history. In England it is traceable to the 14th century when Wyclif insisted that all men had a right to access to the scriptures. In Tudor times, anti-clericalism arose from a variety of motives ranging from greed to a desire to plunder the monasteries to a genuine dislike of priestly powers and abuses. Modern anti-clericalism was prevalent in revolutionary France and remained characteristic of French radicalism during the 19th century. Anti-clericalism has broken out sporadically in Spain (notably in 1873, 1909-13 and 1931-36) and in Latin America. In Germany there has been a long history of anti-clericalism stemming from the opposition to the territorial claims of the Pole and, more recently, over the Catholic Church’s attitude to divorce and contraception. In some communist states, anti-clericalism has risen from the government’s identification of the clergy with former fascist regimes and as part of an ideological battle for the loyalty of the masses.”

Excerpted from: Cook, Chris. Dictionary of Historical Terms. New York: Gramercy, 1998.

Cultural Literacy: George Santayana

George Santayana famously said–and this is one of those quotes that is often repeated erroneously or misattributed–“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” To my mind, this is one of the most cogent aphorisms (and I wrote my MA thesis on the Zeus of aphorists, Nietzsche) ever uttered, to it deserves verbatim repetition and proper attribution.

So I hope this Cultural Literacy worksheet on Santayana’s famous quote aids that modest cause. When I co-taught freshman global studies classes in Manhattan, my excellent co-teacher always started the year with a discussion of the implications of Santayana’s maxim.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Independent Practice: The Reformation

Before I leave for Vermont tomorrow, I need to clear my computer desktop. So, here is an independent practice worksheet on The Reformation if you can use it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crime and Puzzlement: Dead Man’s Curvature

Alright, it’s Monday again, and already light at a little before five in the morning. I love this time of year.

Let’s start the week with a Crime and Puzzlement Lesson Plan, to wit, number seven from the first volume of Lawrence Treat’s seriesDead Man’s Curvature. I start this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet idiom “Steal Someone’s Thunder.” Here is a scan of the illustration and questions that are texts for this lesson. Finally, here is a typescript of the answer key.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Independent Practice: The Han and Tang Dynasties

Here’s is an independent practice worksheet on the Han and Tang dynasties in observation of day two of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2019. Remember that Mark’s Text Terminal will post materials related to this area of study throughout the month of May.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.