Tag Archives: grammar, usage, and style

Write It Right: Afford

“Afford. It is not well to say ‘the fact affords a reasonable presumption’; ‘the house afforded ample accommodation.’ The fact supplies a reasonable presumption. The house offered, or gave, ample accommodation.”

Excerpted from: Bierce, Ambrose. Write it Right: A Little Blacklist of Literary Faults. Mineola, NY: Dover, 2010.

English Usage: Complementary and Complimentary

Here’s an English usage worksheets on the adjectives and homophones complementary and complimentary if you need your students to know, understand, and differentiate these two words.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Addiction

Here is a lesson plan on addiction along with its short reading and its vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. If you want slightly longer versions of both they’re under that hyperlink.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Physi/o

Alrighty, then: here is a worksheet on the Greek root physi/o, which means both nature and physical. This root is, needless to say, very productive in English, especially in the sciences.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Friends

Like the show itself, this short reading on the television show Friends and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet have, over time, been consistently high-interest materials in my classroom. Do your students watch the show?

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Wait (vi, vt, n), Weight (n)

Good morning, eh?

Here are five worksheets on the homophones wait, which as a verb is used both intransitively and transitively, but is also used as a noun (“The tourists had a long wait for the A train to Harlem”), and weight, which is used as a noun.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Psychiatrists and Psychologists

If you want or need to help students differentiate between psychiatrists and psychologists, this lesson plan on the subject along with its short reading and vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet might serve your purpose. And if you think longer versions of these documents (i.e. more vocabulary words and a few more questions) might be better, you’ll find them under this hyperlink.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.