Tag Archives: grammar, usage, and style

Term of Art: Explicit Grammar Instruction

“Instruction in the descriptive terminology and and prescriptive rules of a given language, including syntax and the function of different parts of speech.”

Excerpted from: Ravitch, Diane. EdSpeak: A Glossary of Education Terms, Phrases, Buzzwords, and Jargon. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2007.

Verb Phrase

1. Also verbal phrase. In traditional grammar, a term for the main verb and any auxiliary or combination of auxiliaries that precedes it: can spell; may have cried; should be paid; might have been transferred2. In generative grammar, a term roughly equivalent to the traditional predicate. It includes the traditional verb phrase with (at least) any complements of the verb, such as the non-bracketed parts of the following sentences: (They) have understood his intention); (Susan) was very patient.”

Excerpted from: McArthur, Tom. The Oxford Concise Companion to the English Language. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.

The Weekly Text, June 7, 2019

On Tuesday of this week I posted a complete lesson on using personal pronouns in the nominative case. For this week’s, Text, let’s go to the other side of the sentence.

Here is a complete lesson plan on using the personal pronoun in the objective case. I begin this lesson, after a class transition in order to get students settled, with this Everyday Edit on Iqbal Masih, Child Activist (if you and your students like Everyday Edit worksheets, you can help yourself to a yearlong supply of them at no cost by clicking on that hyperlink); in the event that the lesson spills over into a second day, here is a worksheet on the homophones there, their, and they’re.

The center of this lesson is this scaffolded worksheet on using the personal pronoun in the objective case. Finally, here is the learning support on pronouns and case that I also included on the original post, last Tuesday, on using the personal pronoun in the nominative case.

And that’s it for the penultimate week of the school year here in Springfield, Massachusetts.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Accusative Case in English

“Accusative: Indicating a direct object (or noun or pronoun predicated on a direct object) or certain adverbial complements, e.g. ‘She wrote a book,’ ‘He imagined my sister to be her,’ ‘I waited one week.'”

Excerpted from: Grambs, David. The Random House Dictionary for Writers and Readers. New York: Random House, 1990.

A Learning Support on the Helping Verbs

These two learning supports on helping verbs have been a staple for for struggling readers and writers in my classroom. They’ll probably turn up again on Mark’s Text Terminal when I post lessons on this area of English usage.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

 

A Complete Lesson Plan on Using Personal Pronouns in the Nominative Case

OK: here, on a Tuesday morning, is a complete lesson plan on the personal pronoun in the nominative case.

I begin this lesson, after a class change, with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on Jargon; and if the lesson, for whatever reason (there are many in classroom, as we teacher know) continues into a second day, here is a second do-now, an Everyday Edit worksheet on Booker T. Washington. Incidentally, if you or your students find Everyday Edits useful or edifying, the good people at Education World offer a yearlong supply of them for the taking.

This scaffolded worksheet on using the personal pronoun in the nominative case is the mainstay of this lesson. Finally, here is a learning support on pronouns and case to help students navigate this area of usage and develop their own understanding–and mastery–of it.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Write it Right: Action for Act

“Action for Act. ‘In wrestling, a blow is a reprehensible action.’ A blow is not an action but an act. An action may consist of many acts.”

Excerpted from: Bierce, Ambrose. Write it Right: A Little Blacklist of Literary Faults. Mineola, NY: Dover, 2010.