Tag Archives: grammar, usage, and style

Word Root Exercise: Phil/o, Phile

It’s an extremely productive root in English, so this worksheet on the Greek word roots phil/o and phile might benefit students across a fairly wide band of ability and understanding to build their vocabularies. They mean love, attracted to, affinity for, and a natural liking.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Penta, Pent

Alright, I’m wrapping up on a beautiful summer morning in Western New England. Here is a worksheet on the Greek word roots penta and pent. They mean, of course, five.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Write it Right: Anxious for Eager

“Anxious for Eager. ‘I was anxious to go.’ Anxious should not be followed by an infinitive. Anxiety is contemplative; eagerness, alert for action.”

Excerpted from: Bierce, Ambrose. Write it Right: A Little Blacklist of Literary Faults. Mineola, NY: Dover, 2010.

Word Root Exercise: ology and logy

Here is a worksheet on the Greek roots ology and logy. They mean both study of and science. You needn’t think much about these two roots to realize just how productive they are in English. People studying for careers in the health professions would do well to master these roots’ meanings.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

An Attempt at a Differentiated Thematic Essay Assessment

The principle reason I started Mark’s Text Terminal in 2015, in its second iteration, was to open a conversation with other educators on how best to serve the struggling learners in our schools. By that time, I’d developed enough material for these kids (and some of it for one or two kids) that I wanted to offer it as an example of how I approached the needs of the kids I served. That remains the mission of this blog.

Now, as I start to dig deeper into some folders I haven’t opened in several years, I find some interesting stuff. Several years ago, I started looking at the various standardized, high-stakes tests New York State required the students I served to take. One commonplace in these tests was the thematic essay. Indeed, local tests, written by teachers in schools, often deployed this method of assessment as well.

Because the New York State Global Studies Regents Examinations are reputedly difficult, I decided to work up this structured thematic essay learning support. As I recall, I used it as an instrument for direct instruction, asking students a variety of questions secondary to those on the worksheet itself. Judging from the document, I aimed to get kids thinking and talking about the themes in the worksheet themselves, but also to think more broadly about the idea of a theme and a thematic essay.

Then I put the document away and neither thought about nor used it again. So I would be particularly interested in your comments on this as a way of helping students understand the compositional requirements of a thematic essay as well as the underlying concepts of “theme” and “thematic.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, August 9, 2019

This week’s Text, delivered from Vermont, the only place to be in this month, is a complete lesson plan on the Latin word root cent–which means, you will instantly recognize, and your students will before long, hundred. I use this context clues worksheet on the noun myriad to open this lesson–it gives students a hint about where to look for the meaning of cent. Finally, here is the scaffolded worksheet that is the mainstay of this lesson. It includes cognates, so if you’re working with Spanish-speaking students–or students who speak any or the other Romance languages–they will find words they already know in that list.

You are, I hope, enjoying your summer.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Taut (adj) and Taught (vi/vt)

Here are five homophone worksheets on the adjective taut (it’s also, interestingly, used as a transitive verb to mean mat and tangle in Scots English) and taught, the past tense and past participle of the verb teach, which is used both intransitively and transitively.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.