Tag Archives: grammar, usage, and style

Word Root Exercise: Pneum/o, Pneumon/o, Pneumat/o, –Pnea, and -Pnoea (Greek)

Finally this morning, here is a worksheet on the Greek roots pneum, pneumon-o, -pnea and -pnoea. They mean, variously, breathing, lung, air, and spirit (leave it to the Greeks to blend the literal and metaphorical with ease).

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Vietnam Protest Movement

Here is a reading on the Vietnam protest movement in the 1960s along with its vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. This material might provide valuable context for students seeking to understand the actions and (I hope) changes consequent to them in our nation right now.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Articles

“Articles: The words a, an, and the, which signal or introduce nouns. The definite article the refers to a particular item: the report. The indefinite article a and an refer to a general item or one not already mentioned: an apple.”

Excerpted from: Strunk, William Jr., and E.B. White. The Elements of Style, Fourth Edition. New York: Longman, 2000.

Tutelage (n)

It’s Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day today, and it well may be a word, as the 2020 school year takes shape, that parents and students need to know. So, here is a context clues worksheet on the noun tutelage. You can no doubt hear its relationship to tutor.

So enough said.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Second of Two Lesson Plans on Ancient Egypt

OK, here is the second of two lessons on ancient Egypt. I open this lesson with this worksheet on the noun diaspora; this is a very heavily used words in historical discourse, and I cannot tell you how many times students have asked me to define if for them over the years. If this lesson goes into a second day (I wrote this and the five lessons that precede it below to be taught over a two-day period, FYI), here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the grim reaper. It might not be the best choice for this lesson, but there are plenty of others elsewhere on this website–simply click on the “Cultural Literacy” tag in the word cloud. Finally, here is the worksheet at the center of this lesson with its reading and comprehension questions.

And that is it. In the the six documents posts below (with the interstitial quotes between them), you’ll find most of the rest of the lessons in this far-from-perfect unit.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The First of Two Lesson Plans on Ancient Egypt

Here’s the first of two lesson plans on ancient Egypt. I opened this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the noun empire. In the event that this lesson goes into a second day (and, as below, I’m fairly certain I wrote all of the preceding five lessons with this in mind, so if you teach this lesson over two days, you’ll need this second do-now exercise), here is a worksheet on the ancient Greek city-state of Sparta. Finally, here is the worksheet at the center of this lesson with its reading and comprehension questions.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Egyptian and Mesopotamian Technology

Continuing on with the distribution of the second unit of my freshman global studies cycle for struggling kids, here is a lesson plan on Egyptian and Mesopotamian technology. I opened this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the noun commerce. As the lesson seques into a second day (as below, I am certain I wrote all these lessons to extend over two days), here, to complement the first do-now, is a context clues worksheet on the noun labor. Finally, here is the worksheet with its reading and comprehension questions.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Technological Advancement in the Ages of Metals

Moving right along (see the documents posts below) with a specialized set of lesson plans on prehistory and ancient history, here is a lesson plan on the ages of metals. I opened this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the noun caravan. As the lesson goes into its second day (I’m fairly certain I intended to do that, again, as below, when I wrote it), here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the Seven Wonders of the World. Finally, here is the worksheet with its reading and comprehension questions.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on the Earliest Civilizations: Asia

As below, here is a lesson plan on the earliest civilizations in Asia. Like the rest of the global studies lessons I will post here roughly seriatim (with the usual intervening quotes), this is one version of several lessons I wrote over the years with an eye toward best preparing the students I served to take the New York State Regents Examination in Global Studies and Geography. I forget now which year these lessons represent, but it was certainly a year in which the test was reportedly up for change.

I opened this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the verb banish. If the lesson goes into a second day–and as I unpack and take a second look at these lessons, I seem to recall deliberately writing them to extend over two days so that I could assess how ably students retained knowledge from the previous day–then here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Mesopotamia which you might consider using as an independent practice (i.e. homework) assignment. Finally, here is the in-class worksheet with a reading and comprehension questions.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Write It Right: Allow for Permit

“Allow for Permit. ‘I allow you to go.’ Precision is better attained by saying permit, for allow has other meanings.”

Excerpted from: Bierce, Ambrose. Write it Right: A Little Blacklist of Literary Faults. Mineola, NY: Dover, 2010.