Tag Archives: grammar and style

Everyday Edit: Duke Ellington

Here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on Duke Ellington which Mark’s Text Terminal routes to your from the good people at Education World. That hyperlink will take you to a year’s worth of Everyday Edit worksheets–for free!–if you find them useful in your practice.

Everyday Edit: Voting Rights Act of 1965

Here is an Everyday Edit on the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Usually in this spot at the bottom of a post, I beg for copyediting assistance if readers catch typos in my work, as well as peer review of its efficacy. I needn’t do that here, because this worksheet comes from the generous operators of Education World, who give away a year’s worth of them, which you’ll find if you click that lengthy hyperlink.

A Learning Support on the Parts of Speech

Here is a supported glossary on the parts of speech that, if you teach them, could accompany any lesson on English usage or the parts of speech.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Learning Support on Transition Words

The district office of the school system in which I work just texted the news that, on account of last night’s snowfall here, the beginning of the school day is delayed two hours. So, I’ll make another cup of coffee and push Mark’s Text Terminal to the 1,700 blog posts finish line.

So, here is a learning support for transition words instruction if you do that sort of thing with your students.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Learning Support on Pronouns and Case

While I’ve posted it elsewhere as part of a lesson plan, I’ll publish this learning support on pronouns and case as a stand-alone post so it is easily searchable.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Parable (n)

An illustrative moral or religious story, usually brief and with generalized, simple characters and universal human application; telling or cautionary account.

‘I have never read a story better than Endurance, Alfred Lansing’s account of the Shackleton expedition to Antarctica; but no one considers it literature. If Mailer had written it, might we not read the same text as a parable or something or other.’”

Annie Dillard, Living by Fiction

Excerpted from: Grambs, David. The Random House Dictionary for Writers and Readers. New York: Random House, 1990.

A Learning Support on Latinisms and Latin Abbreviations

Here is a learning support on Latinisms and Latin abbreviations which I was convinced I’d previously posted. However, a search of my media folder locates nothing on this area of usage, so here it debuts, I guess.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.