Tag Archives: grammar and style

A Learning Support on Forming the Degrees of Adjectives

Here, very early on a Wednesday morning, are a pair of learning supports on the degrees of adjectives.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, September 14, 2018

It’s second Friday of our school year here in New York. The first month of school is always a long haul as programming works out, and teachers get to know students. We’ve had one of the sides of Hurricane Florence passing through here this week, so stultifying humidity and the constant threat of rain hangs over the region.

This week’s Text is a complete lesson plan introducing personal pronouns. I use this Everyday Edit worksheet on Pocahontas to begin the lesson; should the lesson go into a second day due to unforeseen circumstances I keep this Cultural Literacy worksheet on satire nearby to start the conclusion of the lesson on that second day. This is the scaffolded worksheet that is the center of the lesson, and here is teacher’s copy of same.

That’s it for this week. Tomorrow begins Hispanic Heritage Month 2018, which runs through October 15. Mark’s Text Terminal will regularly feature, as in years past, materials related to Hispanic Heritage and History for the next four or so weeks.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Lessen (v) and Lesson (n)

Here on a rainy Monday are five homophone worksheets on the verb lessen and the noun lesson to build vocabulary, reinforce good English usage, and resolve confusion about these soundalikes.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Parsing Sentences Worksheets: Pronouns

Here is my last set of parsing sentences worksheets, these four on pronouns. As I’ve mentioned in previous posts about this type of document, I’m not sure if anyone parses sentences anymore in classrooms; I think it’s a defensible exercise, particularly with struggling readers and writers. and it does teach the concept of basic English usage–something, alas, that doesn’t appear to matter in New York City schools.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Appositive (adj)

Indicating close, adjacent, or equivalent relation, such as a following noun that further describes of specifies, e.g., ‘it’s near Chat’s Last Stand, the fast food place.’”

Excerpted from: Grambs, David. The Random House Dictionary for Writers and Readers. New York: Random House, 1990.

A Complete Introductory Lesson Plan for Adjectives

As the summer approaches its end, I find that I dread–for the first time–returning to my current posting. I don’t know if I’ll have a place to work, so I am posting a plethora of materials I would usually set aside for publication as Weekly Texts.

This complete introductory lesson plan on adjectives is something I would have held back for a splashier introduction, but here it is. I start this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the noun attribute; if the lesson goes into a second day (sometimes these introductory lessons, especially in the first few units of the yearlong parts of speech unit I teach, can take a bit longer), I use this Everyday Edit worksheet on “Sled Dogs Save Nome” (and you can find lots more Everyday Edit worksheets at Education World, where there is a year’s supply for free!). This scaffolded worksheet is the mainstay of the lesson. Here is the teacher’s copy of the worksheet for your use.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Derma, Derm, and Dermat/o

It probably won’t take your students long, using this worksheet on the Greek word roots derma, derm, and dermat/o, to figure out that those roots mean skin. That’s why the doctor who deals with the organ of skin is called a dermatologist.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.