Tag Archives: Everyday Edit

The Weekly Text, September 14, 2018

It’s second Friday of our school year here in New York. The first month of school is always a long haul as programming works out, and teachers get to know students. We’ve had one of the sides of Hurricane Florence passing through here this week, so stultifying humidity and the constant threat of rain hangs over the region.

This week’s Text is a complete lesson plan introducing personal pronouns. I use this Everyday Edit worksheet on Pocahontas to begin the lesson; should the lesson go into a second day due to unforeseen circumstances I keep this Cultural Literacy worksheet on satire nearby to start the conclusion of the lesson on that second day. This is the scaffolded worksheet that is the center of the lesson, and here is teacher’s copy of same.

That’s it for this week. Tomorrow begins Hispanic Heritage Month 2018, which runs through October 15. Mark’s Text Terminal will regularly feature, as in years past, materials related to Hispanic Heritage and History for the next four or so weeks.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Complete Introductory Lesson Plan for Adjectives

As the summer approaches its end, I find that I dread–for the first time–returning to my current posting. I don’t know if I’ll have a place to work, so I am posting a plethora of materials I would usually set aside for publication as Weekly Texts.

This complete introductory lesson plan on adjectives is something I would have held back for a splashier introduction, but here it is. I start this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the noun attribute; if the lesson goes into a second day (sometimes these introductory lessons, especially in the first few units of the yearlong parts of speech unit I teach, can take a bit longer), I use this Everyday Edit worksheet on “Sled Dogs Save Nome” (and you can find lots more Everyday Edit worksheets at Education World, where there is a year’s supply for free!). This scaffolded worksheet is the mainstay of the lesson. Here is the teacher’s copy of the worksheet for your use.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Complete Introductory Lesson to Verbs

Today is August 29. It’s the anniversary of the death of Edmond Hoyle, whose name is synonymous with playing card games by the rules (or, “According to Hoyle”). Ingrid Bergman was born on this day in 1915. It’s also the birthday of the great alto saxophonist Charlie Parker, by any measure a major figure in American culture and a musician I’ve loved since I was a teenager myself.

Here’s another late-summer Text, this one, a complete introductory lesson plan for verbs. At the change of class, when students arrive and need a moment of assistance to settle, I use this Cultural Literacy exercise on verbs; in case the lesson goes into a second day, for whatever reason, I keep this Everyday Edit worksheet on Poe’s ‘The Raven'” ready (and, incidentally, you can find a year’s worth of Everyday Edit worksheets at Education World, where the proprietors of that site give them away). The mainstay of this lesson is this scaffolded worksheet on identifying and using verbs. Finally, you might want teacher’s copy of the worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, August 24, 2018

It’s August 24. Today in AD 79, Mount Vesuvius, in Southern Italy, erupted and destroyed the Roman cities of Pompeii, Stabiae, and Herculaneum. The Ukraine celebrates its independence from the Soviet Union today, which it achieved upon the collapse of that empire in 1991. On this day in 1814, during the War of 1812, British forces raided and burned Washington, D.C.

This week’s Text is a complete introductory lesson plan on pronouns. I begin this lesson, in order to get kids settled after a class change, with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on Fine Arts; if, for some reason, the lesson goes into a second day, I use this Everyday Edit worksheet on Maya Angelou to begin the concluding part of the work for this lesson. The mainstay of this lesson is this introductory worksheet on pronouns. You will probably need, or at least want, the teacher’s copy of the worksheet. Finally, here is a learning support on pronouns and case that I use throughout the unit on pronouns that this lesson introduces.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, May 4, 2018

For the first text of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, I offer a materials on one of the most ignoble pieces of legislation ever to pass through our legislative and executive branch, the Chinese Exclusion Act.

So, here is a reading on the Chinese Exclusion Act along with this comprehension worksheet on it. Finally, here is an Everyday Edit on the late Senator Daniel Inouye (and if you want or need more Everyday Edit worksheets, I highly recommend visiting the Everyday Edit page at Education World, where you will find the generous proprietors of the site give away away a yearlong supply of them for free!).

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, March 30, 2018

Today is the final Friday of Women’s History Month 2018. I’m actually posting this week’s Text from my phone, as spring break has begun, and I left my computer at work; I’m on a train headed for lovely Cold Spring, New York for the day.

Depending on what and how you teach, you may find useful this reading on Jackie Joyner-Kersee. If you do, then here is a comprehension worksheet to accompany it. Finally, here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on Bessie Coleman, the aviatrix. (And, incidentally, if you like the Everyday Edit worksheet, the magnanimous people at Education World have a year’s worth of them on offer–for free!).

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, March 23, 2018

Well, it’s Friday again, so it’s time for another Weekly Text, which continues to to observe Women’s History Month. So, here is a reading on Queen Isabella of Spain with a comprehension worksheet to accompany it. As long as we’re on the subject of royalty in modern history, here is an Everyday Edit on the women in King Henry VIII’s life to complement the longer exercises on Queen Isabella. Incidentally, if you want more of these Everyday Edit exercises, the good people at Education World have posted a year’s supply of them free for the taking.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.