Tag Archives: Everyday Edit

A Concluding Lesson Plan on Verbs

If you are a user of this blog, then you may know that I have been, over time, posting all the materials I’ve developed for using the parts of speech to bolster literacy. Since the COVID19 pandemic began, I’ve posted a series of lesson plans on verbs. In fact, with this post, I will have published the entire twelve-lesson unit on verbs that I used in the classroom for several years.

So, if you have accumulated the other eleven lessons, then here is the final lesson plan on verbs, the assessment, for this verbs unit. I open this lesson with this worksheet on the homophones there, their, and they’re. If this lesson continues into a second day (and you’ll see that it is almost inevitable that it will), then here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on National Poetry Month. (If you and your students like the procedural knowledge practice the Everyday Edit worksheets offer you, then you will be pleased to hear that the good people at Education World give away an entire year’s supply of these short exercises.)

Here is the worksheet that serves as a final assessment for the verbs unit posted on this blog.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Lesson Plan on Using Modal and Conditional Verbs

This is the second lesson plan on the use of modal and conditional verbs that I’ve posted in the last week. I wrote two of these in order to break up the forms of these verbs and to help students build their understanding of them through extensive practice in their use.

I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the subjunctive mood of verbs. The subjunctive is a challenging area of usage, and I probably need to take a look at both of these lessons on modals and conditionals to make sure the use of the subjunctive is clear. If this lesson goes into a second day, here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on Ida B. Wells, the great journalist (and don’t forget that if you and your students like Everyday Edit worksheets, the generous people at Education World give away a yearlong supply of them at their website).

This scaffolded worksheet and its accompanying learning support  are the central work of this lesson. While the support contains material specific to this lesson, if you remove that from the bottom of the document, and change the header, you will have a learning support on modal verbs that can be used more broadly than the confines of this lesson. Finally, here is the teacher’s copy of the worksheet to make delivering this lesson a bit easier.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Complete Lesson Plan on Using the Modal and Conditional Verbs

Here is a lesson plan on using modal and conditional verbs.

I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on, simply, verbs. In the event this lesson goes into a second day, here is another do-now, this one an Everyday Edit worksheet on the roller coaster. This scaffolded worksheet on using modal and conditional verbs is the centerpiece of this lesson. Finally, here is the teacher’s copy of the worksheet to make teaching this lesson a little easier.

Incidentally, if you like Everyday Edit worksheets, please remember that the good people at Education World generously offer a yearlong supply of them at their site.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Great Debaters: Lesson 1

Here is the lesson plan for the first lesson in “The Great Debaters” unit plan. This lesson introduces the concept of debate.

I open this lesson with this Everyday Edit worksheet on African American History Month (and don’t forget, to give credit where it is abundantly due, that you can get a yearlong supply of these worksheets at Education World). From there, I move on to this context clues worksheet on debate as a noun. Because this is a definition, discussion, and note-taking lesson, this brainstorming and note-taking worksheet asks some basic questions that should elicit discussion about debate and its role in approaching the truth of a matter.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Concluding Lesson Plan for the Nouns Unit Posted on this Site

OK, readers, I debated with myself about whether or not to publish this post. The documents below are the unit final assessment for my unit on nouns, which means I have posted all the previous lessons–12 of them, to be precise, since this one is lesson 13. You can actually find all the rest of this unit’s lessons underneath this hyperlink. In other words, for the first time, in almost 3,300 published posts, I have managed to get a complete unit published from my parts of speech units. Stay tuned, because there are more to come–and depending on how long social distancing lasts, and schools remain closed, these lessons will continue to appear here every couple of days.

So, here is the lesson plan for this final assessment; nota bene please that I built into this lesson some organizational activities for students who deal with executive skills and attentional challenges. The first do-now exercise for this lesson is this Everyday Edit worksheet on Aquarius, the Water Carrier (and please don’t forget that you can help yourself to a yearlong supply of these worksheets at Education World). The second do-now is this worksheet on the homophones there, their, and they’re. Finally, I’ll assume that this four page assessment speaks to the need for two do-now exercises for this lesson; in fact, in my experience (this is the first of seven units on the parts of speech), this assessment takes at least two days to complete, and may take a third. If that is the case, and you need another do-now, there are reams of them available on this site.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Complete Lesson Plan on the Compound Noun

Alright, moving right along, here is a lesson plan on the compound noun and its use in declarative sentences. I open this lesson with the Everyday Edit worksheet on National Public Radio (and as I will never stop saying every time I post an Everyday Edit worksheet, the generous proprietors of Education World will let you walk away from their site with a yearlong supply of these worksheets free of charge). This scaffolded worksheet at the center of the lesson will take most of your time in helping students master this point of grammar and usage. I made this teacher’s copy of the worksheet to make sure I taught the material consistently. Finally, here is the learning support, a word bank, to help move the work along.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Everyday Edit: Japan’s “Coming of Age Day”

Here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on Japan’s “Coming of Age Day.” If you like these worksheets then you are in luck! The generous people at Education World give away a yearlong supply of them, and if you dig a little deeper over there, you’ll find the answer keys as well.

 

Everyday Edit: Islamic Hajj

Here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on the Islamic Hajj to get kids thinking about our newest neighbors and to help them learn to revise prose. Don’t forget, please, that the good people at Education World give away a yearlong supply of these, free for the taking. I’ve used these to good effect for many years in my classrooms.

And if you find typos in this document, well, repair them! That is the point, after all, of an exercise such as this one.

A Complete Lesson Plan on Using the Predicate Pronoun

Here is a lesson plan on using the predicate pronoun. I open this lesson with this Everyday Edit worksheet on Anne Frank (and you can help yourself to a yearlong supply of these worksheets courtesy of the good people at Education World). Here is a learning support on pronouns to assist students in developing their own understanding of these words and their use in declarative sentences. This scaffolded worksheet is the center of this lesson; here is the teacher’s copy of the worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Everyday Edit: Hiroshima Bombing

Don’t forget that April is Asian Pacific American History Month. Mark’s Text Terminal takes pains to observe four themed history months (Hispanic Heritage, Black or African-American, Women’s, and Asian Pacific American) each year. You can link to materials related to any of these commemorations by using the tags in the word clouds at the top right of this site.

Here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on the bombing of Hiroshima.

To give credit where it is so abundantly due, please don’t forget that the generous people at Education World give away a entire year’s supply of Everyday Edit worksheets.