Tag Archives: Everyday Edit

The Weekly Text, December 20, 2019

Tomorrow is the winter solstice; the day sure seems to come up fast this year. After tomorrow, the days will begin to lengthen, which means warmer weather and more light is on the way. And who doesn’t want that? I like a few deep, dark winter nights, but a little, in the end, goes a long way.

This week’s Text, the last of 2019, is a complete lesson plan on the demonstrative adjective. I open this lesson with this Everyday Edit on worksheet on “Edison’s First Movie Set” (and if you and your students like working with Everyday Edit worksheets, the good folks at Education world give away a year’s supply of them under that hyperlink). If the lesson runs into a second day, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on slang. Finally, here is the scaffolded worksheet on the demonstrative adjectives that is the gravamen of this unit.

That’s it. Happy Hanukkah, Happy, Kwanzaa, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! I’ll be back on Friday, January 3 with the first Weekly Text for 2020.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, November 1, 2019

This week’s Text is a lesson plan on differentiating and using transitive and intransitive verbs. I think it’s important that students understand these kinds of words because if they decide to study an inflected language, they will need to understand how to decline the direct objects of verbs, which often take the accusative case in such languages. I ran into this while studying Russian all those years ago.

In any case, the first do-now exercise for this lesson is this Cultural Literacy worksheet on transitive verbs. If this lesson, for whatever reason, goes into a second day, then here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on Dr. Seuss; if you and your students like that document, then you can find a yearlong supply of them for free from the good people at Education World. Finally, here is the scaffolded worksheet at the center of this lesson.

And that’s it. I bid you a restful and revivifying weekend.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Everyday Edit: Pablo Picasso

Here, in observation of Hispanic History Month 2019, is an Everyday Edit worksheet on Pablo Picasso. If you like this kind of exercise, the good people at Education World very generously offer at no charge a year’s supply of them–that hyperlink will take you to them.

If you find errors in this document…well, then you’re doing good work! Finding and correcting copy errors is kind of the point of this material.

Everyday Edit: Columbus Sets Sail

OK, here is an Everyday Edit worksheet, “Columbus Sets Sail,” which serves, I think, as a pretty good introduction to how Hispanic History begins.

Incidentally, if you, or more importantly, your students, like this kind of exercise, the good people at Education World give away a year-long supply of them at no charge. Just click on the hyperlink in the previous sentence to get to them.

If you find typos in this document…well, that’s the point of it. Ask your students to correct them.

The Weekly Text, June 7, 2019

On Tuesday of this week I posted a complete lesson on using personal pronouns in the nominative case. For this week’s, Text, let’s go to the other side of the sentence.

Here is a complete lesson plan on using the personal pronoun in the objective case. I begin this lesson, after a class transition in order to get students settled, with this Everyday Edit on Iqbal Masih, Child Activist (if you and your students like Everyday Edit worksheets, you can help yourself to a yearlong supply of them at no cost by clicking on that hyperlink); in the event that the lesson spills over into a second day, here is a worksheet on the homophones there, their, and they’re.

The center of this lesson is this scaffolded worksheet on using the personal pronoun in the objective case. Finally, here is the learning support on pronouns and case that I also included on the original post, last Tuesday, on using the personal pronoun in the nominative case.

And that’s it for the penultimate week of the school year here in Springfield, Massachusetts.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Everyday Edit: Chinese New Year

Here is an Everyday Edit on the Chinese New Year. If you like these exercises (in my experience, students enjoy them, and they can be a real confidence builder for struggling readers and writers), you can click through to Education World, whose authors generously offer a yearlong supply of them.

My usual entreaty about peer review and typo alerts don’t apply here: I didn’t write this, and the typos in the worksheet are for your students to note and correct.

Everyday Edit: Chuseok: Korea’s “Thanksgiving”

Here’s an Everyday Edit worksheet on Chuseok-Korea’s “Thanksgiving.”  If you like using this worksheet, the good people at Education World have made a yearlong supply of them available for free.

And you will find typos on this worksheet because they were placed there purposely. The question is, will your students find them?