Tag Archives: Everyday Edit

The Weekly Text, March 30, 2018

Today is the final Friday of Women’s History Month 2018. I’m actually posting this week’s Text from my phone, as spring break has begun, and I left my computer at work; I’m on a train headed for lovely Cold Spring, New York for the day.

Depending on what and how you teach, you may find useful this reading on Jackie Joyner-Kersee. If you do, then here is a comprehension worksheet to accompany it. Finally, here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on Bessie Coleman, the aviatrix. (And, incidentally, if you like the Everyday Edit worksheet, the magnanimous people at Education World have a year’s worth of them on offer–for free!).

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, March 23, 2018

Well, it’s Friday again, so it’s time for another Weekly Text, which continues to to observe Women’s History Month. So, here is a reading on Queen Isabella of Spain with a comprehension worksheet to accompany it. As long as we’re on the subject of royalty in modern history, here is an Everyday Edit on the women in King Henry VIII’s life to complement the longer exercises on Queen Isabella. Incidentally, if you want more of these Everyday Edit exercises, the good people at Education World have posted a year’s supply of them free for the taking.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, March 16, 2018

Another Friday has rolled around, so it’s time for another Weekly Text in observation of Women’s History Month. This week’s Text is a reading on geneticist and botanist Barbara McClintock accompanied by this comprehension worksheet on the reading. Finally, here is a complementary Everyday Edit worksheet on Marie Curie (and you can get a full-year supply of Everyday Edit worksheets from the generous proprietors of the Education World website.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, March 9, 2018

Friday morning at last, which means it’s time for the Weekly Text, this one in observance of Women’s History Month. This week I offer this reading on Lydia Maria Child. To accompany it, here is a reading comprehension worksheet. Finally, here is an Everyday Edit worksheet on “Women Get the Vote.” (And, incidentally, you can get more Everyday Edit Worksheets–indeed, an entire year’s worth–from the generous people at the Education World website.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, March 2, 2018

For some reason, I’ve just endured one of the busiest and most degrading weeks of the school year (and in terms of degradation, there’s plenty more where that came from here in the New York City Department of Education). So I’m exhausted and demoralized.

That said, I do draw some professional satisfaction, and an occasional, quickly transiting sense of achievement from writing on this blog.

So let’s get right to this week’s text, which is a reading on Maya Angelou. You might want to use, or adapt, this comprehension worksheet which accompanies the reading. Finally, here is an Everyday Edit exercise on Women’s History Month to attend any lesson you might want to contrive frome the first two documents. By the way, you can get lots more Everyday Edit worksheets from the generous folks who operate Education World.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, February 23, 2018

This is the last Friday of Black History Month, 2018, so this is by definition the final Weekly Text for the month. I’m actually publishing this from my phone, since I am away from New York (but on an Amtrak train on my way back right this minute).

Here is a reading on Archbishop Desmond Tutu, one of the great men of my lifetime. You might be able to use this comprehension sheet which accompanies the reading. Finally, here is an Everyday Edit on Martin Luther King, Jr. (and you can get lots more Everyday Edits from the good people at Education World.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, February 15, 2018

Tomorrow is the Lunar New Year, which is a holiday for a large group of people here in New York City. We have the day off, so I’m posting this week’s Text a day early so I can get it up on Twitter and the AFT’s Share My Lesson site.

If the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education decision isn’t something that all Americans should revere, then I don’t know what is. I’ll be the first to stipulate that it was belated. But the fact that a a working man named Oliver Brown could bring an action against the discriminatory district in which his children attended school, take it all the way to the highest court in the land, and effectively force this nation to live up to the high ideals asserted in its founding documents should inspire anyone who hears it.

So, here is an Intellectual Devotional reading on Brown v. Board of Education with a reading comprehension worksheet to use with it. This Everyday Edit on Desegregation at Central High (and you can get lots more of these from the generous proprietors of the Education World website) nicely complements this reading.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.