Tag Archives: English language learners

Vestige (n)

Moving right along this morning (light now appears at about 5:30 am, which suits me just fine!), here is a context clues worksheet on the noun vestige. There are a number of uses for this across common branch domains; in any case, it is almost inarguably a word students should know, so that they can master the concept of vestiges.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Cracy and Crat

Alright: I just now completed a months-long project on developing new readings, so I can begin to spend a bit more time at Mark’s Text Terminal.

Here is a worksheet on the Greek roots cracy and crat. Unsurprisingly, they mean government, rule, and power.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Yahoo (n)

Unless you’re teaching Jonathan Swift (to wit, Gulliver’s Travels), or think that you might be able to persuade students to use the word as a softer, more benign insult than students typically use with one another, I suspect this context clues worksheet on the noun yahoo won’t be of much use to you. But there it is if you need or want it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Trajectory (n)

Finally, on this rainy Tuesday morning, here is a context clues worksheet on the noun trajectory.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Worksheet and Learning Support on Forming the Plurals of Nouns

This combination worksheet and learning support on forming the plurals of nouns is something I’ve very nearly dumped several times. Instead, I reformatted it and cleaned up various design errors. I think it could very easily be converted into a simple learning support by supplying students with the declined plurals.

In fact, there are a number of ways this document could be rearranged for classroom use. I’m confident readers of this blog will figure them out.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, April 12, 2019

In this school district, spring break begins today. Not a moment too soon for me, I confess. Here are three context clues worksheets on the verb venerate (it’s transitive), the adjective venerable, and the noun veneration. These three in combination assist students, in my experience, see the way that the parts of speech work in English morphology and vice versa.

If you are on break this week, I bid you a restful vacation.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Technique (n)

Because it’s a common enough word in English, this context clues worksheet on the noun technique is easily justified for classroom use (that and the fact that it should only take a few minutes to complete).

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.