Tag Archives: differentiated instruction

The Weekly Text, March 22, 2019

Yesterday I posted a short exercise on Queen Elizabeth I. As long as we’re dealing with British sovereigns, this week’s Text offers this reading on Eleanor of Aquitaine and its accompanying vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Everyday Edit: Anne Sullivan

Here, on a Monday morning after a fabulously spring-like weekend, which I passed in the charming Westchester County town of Katonah, New York, is an Everyday Edit worksheet on Anne Sullivan, Helen Keller’s legendary teacher.

Incidentally, if you or your students like using these short exercises in your classroom, the good people at Education World generously distribute, at no cost, a yearlong supply of these Everyday Edit worksheets. At my current posting, I am required to use a scripted curriculum, so I cannot employ these in my classroom. In the past, however, I’ve used them regularly to good effect with struggling learners. In fact, I have placed them in lesson plans where appropriate.

The Weekly Text, March 8, 2019

I don’t want to let Women’s History Month 2019 pass without posting something related to Alice Walker. To that end, here is a reading Ms. Walker’s novel The Color Purple and a vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet to accompany it. These, I was pleased to see, were of no small interest to the young women in the classes I currently teach.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review

Cultural Literacy: Athena

It’s Thursday, and as another week proceeds to its end, here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the goddess Athena.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Queen Victoria

Continuing with Women’s History Month 2019, here are a reading on Queen Victoria and a vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet to accompany it. Given her outsized influence in British history, as well as the adjectival form of her name–Victorian–serving as a metaphor for a kind of stuffy, repressed age, whenever and wherever it occurs–she seems to me someone with whom students should have at least a passing familiarity.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Independent Practice: Aksum

Here is an independent practice worksheet on the Kingdom of Aksum, which was located in the north of present-day Ethiopia. If you teach social studies, and particularly global studies, or world history, of whatever your school or district calls the history of global civilizations, than you are no doubt aware of the importance of Aksum.

This is really something, I think, kids ought to know.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Thurgood Marshall

OK: here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on Thurgood Marshall to reminds students of this major–and great–figure in the United States in the twentieth century.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.