Tag Archives: context clues/focus on one word

Plutocracy (n)

Now seems to be the perfect moment, or as perfect as moments get for such things, to post this context clues worksheet on the noun plutocracy. Don’t forget that it morphs to plutocrat and plutocratic, a couple of other good words that nicely represent our zeitgeist.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Abandon (n)

Hot off the press (it was Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day yesterday), here is a context clues worksheet on abandon. This isn’t the verb, but rather the abstract noun signifying, as Merriam-Webster’s has it, “a thorough yielding to natural impulses; esp: ENTHUSIASM, EXUBERANCE.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Rote (n/adj)

Here, on a busy, wet Monday morning, is a context clues worksheet the word rote, which is used both as a noun and an adjective.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Rogue (n)

OK, here’s one more post on a grey and quiet Saturday morning in Springfield, Massachusetts, to wit a context clues worksheet on the noun rogue. Does anyone use this word anymore?

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Ritzy (adj)

Because it was Merriam-Webster’s word of the day yesterday, here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective ritzy today. While this is adjective is arguably vernacular, it is part of the grain of American English vernacular; ergo, I suppose, there is an argument to be made for teaching it as such, particularly to English Language Learners, for whom a teacher might want to make the connection to the Ritz Hotels.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Austerity (n) and Austere (adj)

Here are two context clues worksheets on the noun austerity and the adjective austere. I’m hard-pressed to imagine why high school students, especially seniors, whether college-bound or not, shouldn’t know these words. They will, I expect, be very much in the news in the not-too-distant future.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Impromptu (adj)

If you need or want it–I do think this is a word high schoolers ought to know by their graduation–here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective impromptu.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.