Tag Archives: context clues/focus on one word

The Weekly Text, December 6, 2019

This week’s Text is a complete lesson plan on the Latin word root bene. It means good and well, and as you have probably already figured out, it turns up as the root of such common words in English as benefit and benevolent. This context clues worksheet on the noun welfare with which I intended deploy a hint to point students in the right direction (and also to hint at the idea that government welfare benefits, which so many families in our nation now receive, are meant to keep us, as individuals and as a society, good and well). Finally, here is the word root worksheet that is the mainstay of this lesson.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Hypothesis (n)

OK, it’s Friday morning already, and this school district has already called for early dismissal today on account of yet another day of snowfall. With few exceptions, I haven’t seen this much snow fall in such a short period of time since…well, since 1996, the last time I lived in Vermont.

I’ll start off the morning by offering this context clues worksheet on the noun hypothesis. And I’ll also begin the day with the assumption that the importance of this word in students’ lexicons starting in, say, fifth grade (at least that’s when I earned it), goes without saying.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Hoodwink (vt)

Although Merriam-Webster’s designates its usage as “to blindfold” as archaic, this context clues worksheet on the verb hoodwink, which is only used transitively, will help students infer the demotic usage of this word, which is “to deceive by false appearance.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Gravity (n)

Rereading this context clues worksheet on gravity caused me to realize that because gravity is a very difficult abstraction to explain, this document is not exactly the strongest I’ve ever composed. In any case, it is, like everything else on this website, in Microsoft Word, so you can edit or rewrite as you see fit.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Frenzy (n)

Because it’s a word that well describes the snowfall here in Bennington, Vermont over the past forty hours or so. this context clues worksheet on the noun frenzy seems an appropriate choice to post this morning.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Pan, Panto

This worksheet on the Greek Word roots pan and panto–they mean all–guides students through an extremely productive root in English.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Forlorn (adj)

OK, it’s a snow day in my southwestern Vermont district, which is a perfect opportunity for me to feel useful by publishing some blog posts. Here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective forlorn.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.