Tag Archives: context clues/focus on one word

Hypothesize (vi/vt)

OK, here on a insufferably muggy October afternoon in The Bronx is a context clues worksheet on the verb hypothesize. Used intransitively, this verb means to make a hypothesis; transitively, it means to adopt as a hypothesis.

Small wonder English language learners puzzle over this language.

If you find typos in these document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Hallmark (n)

This context clues worksheet on the noun hallmark was one of the first of these exercises I composed. Student in a freshman global studies class I was co-teaching were reading about river valley civilizations, and the locution “hallmark of civilization” recurred in the textbook we were using. Finally, one plucky ninth-grader stood up and said “We have a Hallmark store in my neighborhood.”

So I knew I needed this worksheet.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Forensic (n/adj)

For the past couple of weeks, I’ve been reading and editing college application essays in a couple of senior English Language Arts classes I co-teach. It has been awhile since I dealt with this kind of writing–to wit my own application essay. In any case, this is my first time teaching this course. It’s fun, but new, and therefore challenging in the way teachers hope to be challenged.

Quite a few young people are interested in careers in forensic science these days. Forensic is one of those tricky polysemous words in English. When I wrote this context clues worksheet on the noun and adjective forensic, I wanted students to understand its meaning, as you will see if you use it, as an argumentative exercise, as in a debate team. But it also means, as television shows have it, as the application of scientific knowledge to legal problems; esp: scientific analysis of physical evidence (as from a crime scene).

As time passes, I am persuaded that the best way to help students develop their own deep understanding is to start them with the Latin adjective forensis, from which the English forensic evolved. That way, students begin with the basic conceptual knowledge this word represents, i.e. public; pertaining to the courts. Then, with that prior knowledge as a foundation, teachers and students can move forward in understanding forensic in English, which is more nuanced that its Latin ancestor.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Fungible (adj)

For the past eleven years, I’ve worked in a economics-and-finance-themed high school in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan. For some reason, in this school, one door away from the former headquarters of the American Stock Exchange, I’ve never heard students use the noun fungibility or the adjective fungible.  Despite its essentiality to understanding a certain area of economics–i.e. commodities and exchange–I’ve never seen students working on material that would help them understand it.

So, a few years ago, I wrote this context clues worksheet on the adjective fungible as an attempt to start students down the road to understanding this word and the concepts it represents. However, given the complexity of fungibility, this only briefly prepares students for that understanding. In high school, that may all that students require. But I would argue that they should at least arrive at the doors of their college or university with this word in their vocabularies.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Fallow (adj)

While I sit here waiting for files to back up to a flash drive, I’ll take a minute to post this context clues worksheet on the adjective fallow. If memory serves, and I’m confident it does, I wrote this to assist students in developing the concept of a fallow farm field for a co-teacher’s lesson on the medieval agricultural practice of three-field crop rotation.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

A Complete Lesson Plan on the Greek Word Root Anthrop/o

Rain continues to fall in New York City, a manifestation of Hurricane Florence, which is about to put a beatdown on the Carolinas. I’m glad to be in my dry apartment working on posting this complete lesson on the Greek word root anthrop/o, which means man and human. I start this lesson with this context clues worksheet for the noun humanity to provide a basis for the heuristic work this scaffolded worksheet with an independent practice assignment requires of students. The context clues worksheets can serve as the prior knowledge students will need to help them understand the meaning of this Greek word root.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Fallacy (n)

Over the years, I’ve developed a variety of materials related to the composition of synthetic research papers, particularly around marshaling evidence, citing sources, and postulating theses. I developed this context clues worksheet on the noun fallacy for use in the service of the latter task.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.