Tag Archives: context clues/focus on one word

Outlandish (adjective)

OK, moving right along, here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective outlandish.  This word is in common enough use in the vernacular that students should probably know it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Orthography (n)

It’s probably not an essential word for high school students, but here, nonetheless, is a context clues worksheet on the noun orthography if you can use it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Assert (vt)

It turned up in a discursive lesson I taught in a personal development class yesterday (on, of all things, what’s “wrong” with Eric Cartman of “South Park”), so here is a context clues worksheet on the verb assert. It is used only transitively, apparently, which makes sense if one thinks about where and how to use it in speech and prose.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Aggregate (n)

OK, after a long weekend, here is a context clues worksheet on aggregate used as a noun. It seems to me that somewhere along the way I wanted to write one of these for aggregate as a verb as well. So be on the lookout for that, I suppose.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Aficionado (n)

Moving right along this morning, as a Mozart piano concerto (Malcolm Bilson at the fortepiano–exquisite) plays in the background, here is a context clues worksheet on the noun aficionado.

In context? “The proprietor of Mark’s Text Terminal is an aficionado of Mozart’s piano concerti.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Acrimony (n)

Moving right along on this cool, damp morning in Southwestern Vermont, here is a context clues worksheet on the noun acrimony. I suspect that its adjectival form, acrimonious, is probably in more common usage in the English language. In any case, acrimony and the concept it represents probably ought to be a part of a high school student’s linguistic toolkit.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Arduous (adj)

Here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective arduous if you need it.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.