Tag Archives: context clues/focus on one word

Parse (vi/vt)

It was Merriam-Webster’s word of the day yesterday, so here is a context clues worksheet on the verb parse, which is used both intransively and transitively. Given the number of parsing sentences worksheets I’ve drafted over the years, I still can’t figure out how I never created an instrument for introducing the verb parse to students. 

Anyway, here is is now; better late than never.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Perceive (vt), Perception (n), Perceptive (adj)

Here are three context clues worksheets on the verb perceive, the noun perception, and the adjective perceptive. Because there are three parts of speech represented here, I try to use these in the classroom as chronologically close to each other as possible. Also, nota bene please that the verb perceive is only used transitively.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, June 26, 2020

This week’s Text is a lesson plan on the Latin word roots magn, magna, and magni. They mean great and large and are very productive in English. I open this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the adjective voluminous. Voluminous, as you most likely understand, means (among other things) “having or marked by great volume or bulk.” I chose this word for this lesson to offer both a hint about what the three roots here under study mean, but also to supply a near synonym. Finally, here is the scaffolded worksheet at the center of this lesson’s work.

Happy Friday! Wash your hands, wear a mask, stay safe.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Omnipotent (adj)

It was Merriam-Webster’s word of the day yesterday (today’s is yokel, which I thought I’d pass on, since it has always struck me as an epithet, which we don’t need to teach our students), so here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective omnipotent.

Not to put too fine a point on this, but now strikes me as a pretty good time for people of all ages to know and understand this word, and to be skeptical of leaders who aspire to omnipotence.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Masterful (adj)

It was Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day yesterday, to here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective masterful–a nice sold modifier.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Crux (n)

It’s Merriam-Webster’s word of the day today, so here is context clues worksheet on the noun crux. It seems like a word–and a concept represented by the word–that graduating high school seniors ought to have in their linguistic toolboxes.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Salutation (n), Valediction (n)

Should you have any interest in teaching students to write letters (I think you should, though also recognize that you needn’t if you so choose or are teaching to tests), you might find this context clues worksheet on the noun salutation and this one on the noun valediction useful in introducing these two concepts vital to letter writing to your students. You could also use them as they are, or rewrite them, to introduce the words salutatorian and valedictorian to your graduating seniors.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Siege (n), Besiege (vt)

Here are pair of context clues worksheets for words used regularly in social studies classes that always caused my students, particularly English language learners, a lot of confusion. The first is on the noun siege and the second is on the verb besiege. The verb is only used transitively, so you’ll need a direct object–something has to be besieged–a fort, a city, a building–you get the picture. And once one of these things has been besieged? Then it is under siege.

OK? Any questions?

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Capricious (adj)

It’s Merriam-Webster’s word of the day today, so here is a context clues on the adjective capricious.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Censor (vt), Censorship (n)

OK, very quickly this morning, here are a pair of context clues worksheets on the verb censor and the noun censorship. The verb, incidentally, is only used transitively–you need a direct object, i.e. you need to censor something.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.