Tag Archives: context clues/focus on one word

Abundant (adj.)

Here, on a beautiful Wednesday morning in New York City, is a context clues worksheet on the adjective abundant. I’m always surprised at how many high school freshmen don’t know this word.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Regal (adj.)

It’s Monday morning, and I’m back at work after a humid and therefore lazy weekend. Before I go downstairs to proctor New York State Regents, I’ll take a moment to post this context clues worksheet on the adjective regal.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, June 16, 2017

Since the idea of success is something schools now flog, albeit in a vapid and decontextualized sense, we should not be surprised to learn that when we talk, in our social studies classes, about successors–to thrones, offices, and the like–our students understand this as someone who has experienced success, rather than someone who has succeeded in the sense of following someone else in a position of power or authority.

This week’s Text, in an attempt to clear up this misconception, is three context clues worksheets on succession, successor, and successive, which are, respectively, a noun, a noun, and an adjective.

That’s it: I hope you find these useful.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: -mancy

I’ve struggled with this worksheet on the Greek Word root –mancy for a variety of reasons, but mainly because it means divination which Merriam-Webster defines as the art or practice that seeks to foresee or foretell future events or discover hidden knowledge usually by the interpretation of omens or by the aid of supernatural powers. I’ve used this worksheet in the classroom, mainly to assess students’ ability to recognize the pattern in the definitions, which all include the word divination front and center.

However, that hasn’t done much to help students understand the larger meaning of these four words. I’ve added some context clues sentences to the worksheet to guide students toward the meaning of divination, rather than just telling them the definition, which I don’t like to do–students themselves need to use the word to master its meaning.

I realize that these aren’t some of the most commonly used words in the English language (although if one studies intellectual and/or religious history, as I did as an undergraduate, the word necromancy comes up more often than you’d imagine it would). That said, these are abstract words, and many of the students I serve need assistance in understanding abstract concepts and the words that represent them. This worksheet might be best thought of as a useful intellectual exercise in vocabulary building for struggling students–using words that students may never use themselves.

Needless to say, I hope, I don’t necessarily consider this some of my best work. If you were ever inclined to comment on something you take away from Mark’s Text Terminal, I entreat you for your assessment of this–in my opinion, on this date–dubious worksheet.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Textile (n.)

If you teach social studies, you might be able to use this context clues worksheet on the noun textile. It’s a term that repeats a sufficient number of times in the curriculum, I would think, that we ought to help students gain mastery of it as early as possible.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Risque (adj.)

Because I work in a high school, I hear a lot of foul language. I’ve tried to take the high road on this, teaching students about how certain linguistic registers apply to certain social situations, and vice versa. One way I’ve tried to do this is to introduce, by way of this context clues worksheet on the adjective risque, the idea that there are some things–and I emphasize that things are represented by words we call nouns–that are just too, well, risque to utter in certain company (e.g. teachers) and some circumstances (e.g. schools).

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Quell (vt.)

Here is a context clues worksheet on the transitive verb quell.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.