Tag Archives: context clues/focus on one word

Proliferate (vi/vt)

Since it’s Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day today, and I am on a two-hour delay for the start of the school day, circumstances both permit and require me to off this context clues worksheet on the verb proliferate. Merriam-Webster says it is used both intransitively and transitively, although I don’t know that I have ever used it transitively.

Would it look and sound like this? “The lobbyist from Big Bummer proliferated legislation promoting bad vibes wherever he went.”

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Burn the Midnight Oil

As students head off to college, teachers probably should explain to them the cognitive science research on “cramming” as a method of studying, i.e. that it is basically useless and mostly exhausting. Perhaps this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the idiom burn the midnight oil would serve as an elegant way to kill two birds with one stone: teach students a new idiomatic expression, and urge them to pace themselves when studying.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Foray (n)

Last weekend it was one of Merriam-Webster’s words of the day, so here is a context clues worksheet on the noun foray. The word is in common enough usage, and more importantly is a word that, for an abstraction, has strong concrete properties. It is in common enough usage that it’s a word students ought to know by the time they graduate high school, I submit.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Sleuth (vt/vi)

OK, I’m on a break between professional development session. Because it is Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day today, here is a context clues worksheet on sleuth as a verb, which is used both transitively and intransitively.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Adjudicate (vt/vi)

Here is a context clues worksheet on the verb adjudicate, which is used both transitively, and intransitively. It seems like a word that could usefully find its way into the lexicons of teenagers.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Myopic (adj)

While I’m not sure it’s a word high school students need to know, because it’s Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day today, and I like a challenge here is a context clues worksheet on the adjective myopic. I found it difficult to create context whose contrast would clearly define the second meaning of this adjective, in the sense of “lacking in foresight or discernment : narrow in perspective and without concern for broader implications.” Maybe that’s because it’s Friday, and my pea brain hurts.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Wherewithal (n)

As it is in sufficiently active use in the lexicons of most educated people, I worked up this context clues worksheet on the noun wherewithal for use in the high school classroom. For an abstract noun, it has always struck me as surprisingly sturdy word.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.