Tag Archives: building vocabulary

Cultural Literacy: Aristocracy

OK. here on a Sunday afternoon is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on aristocracy. By the strict definition of Hispanic Heritage Month, it’s another stretch. On the other hand, students need to understand the concept of aristocracy to understand land distribution across the Latin American world and its consequence, poverty.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Equ/Equi

It’s 51 degrees at 5:10 this morning in The Bronx, This is the first weather approximating autumn this year. On Wednesday, it was 80 degrees here. Weird.

Here is a worksheet on the Latin word roots equ and equi. As you no doubt recognize, as, let’s hope, your student do as well, these two roots simply mean equal.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, October 12, 2018

Today is the final Friday of Hispanic Heritage Month 2018. This week’s Text is this reading on the Inca rebel Tupac Amaru II and the comprehension worksheet that accompanies it. If you recognize this anti-colonialist hero’s name, it’s very likely because the late rapper Tupac Amaru Shakur was named for him.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Ante

Here is a worksheet on the Latin word root ante. It means before and shows up in the Spanish conjunction, preposition and adverb antes de (again, before).

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Francisco de Goya

Somewhere in the shuffle of documents for posts in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month 2018 (and those for 2016 and 2017 as well) l misplaced this reading on Francisco de Goya and the comprehension worksheet that complements it. He’s a key late-Enlightenment figure, and this reading has some key points on art history.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Hypothesize (vi/vt)

OK, here on a insufferably muggy October afternoon in The Bronx is a context clues worksheet on the verb hypothesize. Used intransitively, this verb means to make a hypothesis; transitively, it means to adopt as a hypothesis.

Small wonder English language learners puzzle over this language.

If you find typos in these document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Hallmark (n)

This context clues worksheet on the noun hallmark was one of the first of these exercises I composed. Student in a freshman global studies class I was co-teaching were reading about river valley civilizations, and the locution “hallmark of civilization” recurred in the textbook we were using. Finally, one plucky ninth-grader stood up and said “We have a Hallmark store in my neighborhood.”

So I knew I needed this worksheet.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.