Tag Archives: building vocabulary

The Weekly Text, June 23, 2017

Summer break is nigh upon us here in New York City, and not a moment too soon. For the past couple of weeks we have endured the inanity of the New York State Regents Examinations.

This week’s Text is a complete lesson on using the predicate adjective in declarative sentences. There are two do-now worksheets to accompany this lesson in the event that the lesson runs into two days: the first is an Everyday Edit on Laura Ingalls Wilder; the second is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the common Latinism in English, nota bene. This lesson also provides a a word bank of predicate adjectives that serves as a learning support. You’ll need this scaffolded worksheet on the predicate adjectives for your students; to deliver this lesson, I find it’s handy to have this teacher’s copy and answer key.

That’s it. I hope this is useful to you.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Mis/o

Here is a short exercise on the Greek word root mis/o. Neither you nor your students will need to look hard or far to see that this means to hate.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Abundant (adj.)

Here, on a beautiful Wednesday morning in New York City, is a context clues worksheet on the adjective abundant. I’m always surprised at how many high school freshmen don’t know this word.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Xer/o, Xeri

Here, on a warm and muggy (yet quite chilly in this building, with the air conditioning laboring against less than one-tenth of the human bodies that normally complement this building) Tuesday morning is a short exercise on the Greek word roots xer/o and xeri. They mean dry.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Regal (adj.)

It’s Monday morning, and I’m back at work after a humid and therefore lazy weekend. Before I go downstairs to proctor New York State Regents, I’ll take a moment to post this context clues worksheet on the adjective regal.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, June 16, 2017

Since the idea of success is something schools now flog, albeit in a vapid and decontextualized sense, we should not be surprised to learn that when we talk, in our social studies classes, about successors–to thrones, offices, and the like–our students understand this as someone who has experienced success, rather than someone who has succeeded in the sense of following someone else in a position of power or authority.

This week’s Text, in an attempt to clear up this misconception, is three context clues worksheets on succession, successor, and successive, which are, respectively, a noun, a noun, and an adjective.

That’s it: I hope you find these useful.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: agog

Here’s a worksheet on the Greek word root agog, which you will know doubt recognize as the basis of the word pedagogue. It means “leader” and “to lead.” With another Greek root, ped/o, you can see how pedagogue means, literally, “leader of children,” i.e., teacher.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.