Tag Archives: building vocabulary

The Weekly Text, July 3, 2020

This week’s Text is a lesson plan on the Crime and Puzzlement case “Bomb Sight.” I open this lesson with this Cultural Literacy worksheet on the proverb “pride goeth before a fall.” You’ll need this scan of the illustration and questions that drive the case to conduct your investigation. Finally, here is the typescript of the answer key so that you and your students can solve the case and arrest the suspected felon and bring him or her to the bar of justice.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Doonesbury

If you have any budding comic strip drafters, graphic novelists, or just kids who like to draw in your cohort (I’ve had quite a few over the years), then this reading on the comic strip Doonesbury and its vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet might be of interest to them. In my experience, this reading has been high-interest material for a certain kind of student, especially once they’ve seen the strip itself–available in most daily newspapers and, of course, online. If you had told me that more than forty years after I was introduced to this strip in high school it would still be going strong, I don’t know if I would have believed it.

So, if nothing else, the topical nature of Doonesbury and its longevity, inextricably intertwined as they are, is an area for some critical inquiry.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Word Root Exercise: Purg

Moving right along on this rainy morning in Vermont, here is a worksheet on the Latin word root purg. It means clean, and is a very productive root in English and the Romance languages. However, as you will see, you and your students, where words that grow around this root are concerned, will need to think broadly and figuratively about the definition of clean.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

English Usage: Continual, Continous

Here’s an English usage worksheet on differentiating the use of the adjectives continual and continuous.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Parse (vi/vt)

It was Merriam-Webster’s word of the day yesterday, so here is a context clues worksheet on the verb parse, which is used both intransively and transitively. Given the number of parsing sentences worksheets I’ve drafted over the years, I still can’t figure out how I never created an instrument for introducing the verb parse to students. 

Anyway, here is is now; better late than never.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Neurosis

None of us know, I guess, what’s going to happen with schools opening in the fall. Even with the best case scenario, opening schools is a dicey proposition. In any case, health teachers or just about anyone in a classroom come September, you may find this reading on neurosis and its attendant vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet useful for helping your students understand their feelings.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Perceive (vt), Perception (n), Perceptive (adj)

Here are three context clues worksheets on the verb perceive, the noun perception, and the adjective perceptive. Because there are three parts of speech represented here, I try to use these in the classroom as chronologically close to each other as possible. Also, nota bene please that the verb perceive is only used transitively.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

Cultural Literacy: Mixed Economy

I’m not sure if high-school economics class get to the point of discussing them (when I worked and at an economics and finance themed high school, the topic never came up, which may mean something), but if one somewhere does, than here is a Cultural Literacy worksheet on the concept of a mixed economy.

If you find typos in this document, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Weekly Text, June 26, 2020

This week’s Text is a lesson plan on the Latin word roots magn, magna, and magni. They mean great and large and are very productive in English. I open this lesson with this context clues worksheet on the adjective voluminous. Voluminous, as you most likely understand, means (among other things) “having or marked by great volume or bulk.” I chose this word for this lesson to offer both a hint about what the three roots here under study mean, but also to supply a near synonym. Finally, here is the scaffolded worksheet at the center of this lesson’s work.

Happy Friday! Wash your hands, wear a mask, stay safe.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.

The Catcher in the Rye

Alright, moving right along on this fine Vermont morning, here is a reading on The Catcher in the Rye along with its vocabulary-building and comprehension worksheet. This is really more in the way of an introduction to the novel–and maybe a way of motivating reluctant or alienated learners to take a chance on the book.

If you find typos in these documents, I would appreciate a notification. And, as always, if you find this material useful in your practice, I would be grateful to hear what you think of it. I seek your peer review.